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Wrong Thomas Docherty?

Prof. Thomas Docherty

Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Warwick University

Direct Phone: +44 ***********       

Warwick University

Gibbet Hill Rd

Coventry, West Midlands CV4 7AL

United Kingdom

Company Description

Warwick Ventures was created in April 2000 to build on the research successes of the University of Warwick. Warwick Ventures is responsible for ensuring that the intellectual property that is the result of the University's annual research spend - some £12... more

Find other employees at this company (9,482)

Background Information

Employment History

Student
Glasgow University

Affiliations

Member of the Steering Committee
Council for the Defence of British Universities

Education


Mathematics and Philosophy
Glasgow

MA
English and French Language and Literature
Glasgow

Web References (173 Total References)


Uncategorized | CDBU

cdbu.org.uk [cached]

Professor Thomas Docherty

'Professor suspended from top university for giving off "negative vibes".' Thus read the headline in The Telegraph on Friday 24 October. 'Professor at top university was suspended for nine months after he was accused of sighing and being sarcastic during job interviews': this was the Daily Mail's take on the same story. Other charges against the culprit, Warwick's Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Thomas Docherty, The Mirror revealed, included 'making ironic comments' and 'projecting negative body language'.
...
While refusing to discuss the grounds of the suspension, the University insisted that Docherty was not suspended in order to silence his outspoken criticism; yet it turns out that the issue of free expression - verbal and non-verbal - was part of the case against him. In a genuinely liberal intellectual environment, the attitude any individual takes with regard to a speaker - whether a student in tutorial, a seminar speaker, or a candidate - is a matter for individual judgment, and so (within broad limits) is the question of how they choose to express that attitude. If others find a colleague's behaviour discourteous, they are free to tell him so. Instead, Warwick's senior management hired corporate lawyers to argue that behaviour of this kind was grounds for dismissal.
Moreover, Warwick's management showed their hand even more clearly when they forbade Docherty from attending a conference devoted to the republication of E.P. Thompson's Warwick University Ltd., or to address the conference by Skype, or initially even to have a letter from him read out to the gathering - although on this point the University eventually relented. Given that Thompson's book was a prescient discussion of the legal battles waged by Warwick in 1970 to prevent the publication of evidence that it was spying on its own staff and students and curbing academic freedom on behalf of business interests, these proceedings were bound to be interpreted by many as thinly disguised censorship, plain and simple.
Justice for Thomas Docherty is good news for higher education in general. Reputation managers in other universities might have been tempted to emulate these tactics if Warwick had been successful. Now they will think twice. But serious damage has also been done - how much remains to be seen.
We now know, for starters, that the ban on Docherty inflicted considerable damage on his students. As well as being banned from campus, from the library, and from email contact with his colleagues, Docherty was prohibited from supervising his graduate students and from writing references. Indiscriminate, disproportionate, and unjust measures against the professor were also deeply unfair to his students.
...
Posted inUncategorized | Taggedacademic freedom, governance, insubordination, managerialism, reputation, Thomas Docherty, Warwick University


managerialism | CDBU

cdbu.org.uk [cached]

Professor Thomas Docherty

'Professor suspended from top university for giving off "negative vibes".' Thus read the headline in The Telegraph on Friday 24 October. 'Professor at top university was suspended for nine months after he was accused of sighing and being sarcastic during job interviews': this was the Daily Mail's take on the same story. Other charges against the culprit, Warwick's Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Thomas Docherty, The Mirror revealed, included 'making ironic comments' and 'projecting negative body language'.
...
While refusing to discuss the grounds of the suspension, the University insisted that Docherty was not suspended in order to silence his outspoken criticism; yet it turns out that the issue of free expression - verbal and non-verbal - was part of the case against him. In a genuinely liberal intellectual environment, the attitude any individual takes with regard to a speaker - whether a student in tutorial, a seminar speaker, or a candidate - is a matter for individual judgment, and so (within broad limits) is the question of how they choose to express that attitude. If others find a colleague's behaviour discourteous, they are free to tell him so. Instead, Warwick's senior management hired corporate lawyers to argue that behaviour of this kind was grounds for dismissal.
Moreover, Warwick's management showed their hand even more clearly when they forbade Docherty from attending a conference devoted to the republication of E.P. Thompson's Warwick University Ltd., or to address the conference by Skype, or initially even to have a letter from him read out to the gathering - although on this point the University eventually relented. Given that Thompson's book was a prescient discussion of the legal battles waged by Warwick in 1970 to prevent the publication of evidence that it was spying on its own staff and students and curbing academic freedom on behalf of business interests, these proceedings were bound to be interpreted by many as thinly disguised censorship, plain and simple.
Justice for Thomas Docherty is good news for higher education in general. Reputation managers in other universities might have been tempted to emulate these tactics if Warwick had been successful. Now they will think twice. But serious damage has also been done - how much remains to be seen.
We now know, for starters, that the ban on Docherty inflicted considerable damage on his students. As well as being banned from campus, from the library, and from email contact with his colleagues, Docherty was prohibited from supervising his graduate students and from writing references. Indiscriminate, disproportionate, and unjust measures against the professor were also deeply unfair to his students.
...
Posted inUncategorized | Taggedacademic freedom, governance, insubordination, managerialism, reputation, Thomas Docherty, Warwick University


Resources | CDBU

cdbu.org.uk [cached]

The Unseen Academy by Thomas Docherty, THE, 10 November 2011


Blog | CDBU | Council for the Defence of British Universities | Page 3

cdbu.org.uk [cached]

Professor Thomas Docherty

'Professor suspended from top university for giving off "negative vibes".' Thus read the headline in The Telegraph on Friday 24 October. 'Professor at top university was suspended for nine months after he was accused of sighing and being sarcastic during job interviews': this was the Daily Mail's take on the same story. Other charges against the culprit, Warwick's Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Thomas Docherty, The Mirror revealed, included 'making ironic comments' and 'projecting negative body language'.
...
While refusing to discuss the grounds of the suspension, the University insisted that Docherty was not suspended in order to silence his outspoken criticism; yet it turns out that the issue of free expression - verbal and non-verbal - was part of the case against him. In a genuinely liberal intellectual environment, the attitude any individual takes with regard to a speaker - whether a student in tutorial, a seminar speaker, or a candidate - is a matter for individual judgment, and so (within broad limits) is the question of how they choose to express that attitude. If others find a colleague's behaviour discourteous, they are free to tell him so. Instead, Warwick's senior management hired corporate lawyers to argue that behaviour of this kind was grounds for dismissal.
Moreover, Warwick's management showed their hand even more clearly when they forbade Docherty from attending a conference devoted to the republication of E.P. Thompson's Warwick University Ltd., or to address the conference by Skype, or initially even to have a letter from him read out to the gathering - although on this point the University eventually relented. Given that Thompson's book was a prescient discussion of the legal battles waged by Warwick in 1970 to prevent the publication of evidence that it was spying on its own staff and students and curbing academic freedom on behalf of business interests, these proceedings were bound to be interpreted by many as thinly disguised censorship, plain and simple.
Justice for Thomas Docherty is good news for higher education in general. Reputation managers in other universities might have been tempted to emulate these tactics if Warwick had been successful. Now they will think twice. But serious damage has also been done - how much remains to be seen.
We now know, for starters, that the ban on Docherty inflicted considerable damage on his students. As well as being banned from campus, from the library, and from email contact with his colleagues, Docherty was prohibited from supervising his graduate students and from writing references. Indiscriminate, disproportionate, and unjust measures against the professor were also deeply unfair to his students.
...
Posted inUncategorized | Taggedacademic freedom, governance, insubordination, managerialism, reputation, Thomas Docherty, Warwick University


academic freedom | CDBU

cdbu.org.uk [cached]

Professor Thomas Docherty

'Professor suspended from top university for giving off "negative vibes".' Thus read the headline in The Telegraph on Friday 24 October. 'Professor at top university was suspended for nine months after he was accused of sighing and being sarcastic during job interviews': this was the Daily Mail's take on the same story. Other charges against the culprit, Warwick's Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Thomas Docherty, The Mirror revealed, included 'making ironic comments' and 'projecting negative body language'.
...
While refusing to discuss the grounds of the suspension, the University insisted that Docherty was not suspended in order to silence his outspoken criticism; yet it turns out that the issue of free expression - verbal and non-verbal - was part of the case against him. In a genuinely liberal intellectual environment, the attitude any individual takes with regard to a speaker - whether a student in tutorial, a seminar speaker, or a candidate - is a matter for individual judgment, and so (within broad limits) is the question of how they choose to express that attitude. If others find a colleague's behaviour discourteous, they are free to tell him so. Instead, Warwick's senior management hired corporate lawyers to argue that behaviour of this kind was grounds for dismissal.
Moreover, Warwick's management showed their hand even more clearly when they forbade Docherty from attending a conference devoted to the republication of E.P. Thompson's Warwick University Ltd., or to address the conference by Skype, or initially even to have a letter from him read out to the gathering - although on this point the University eventually relented. Given that Thompson's book was a prescient discussion of the legal battles waged by Warwick in 1970 to prevent the publication of evidence that it was spying on its own staff and students and curbing academic freedom on behalf of business interests, these proceedings were bound to be interpreted by many as thinly disguised censorship, plain and simple.
Justice for Thomas Docherty is good news for higher education in general. Reputation managers in other universities might have been tempted to emulate these tactics if Warwick had been successful. Now they will think twice. But serious damage has also been done - how much remains to be seen.
We now know, for starters, that the ban on Docherty inflicted considerable damage on his students. As well as being banned from campus, from the library, and from email contact with his colleagues, Docherty was prohibited from supervising his graduate students and from writing references. Indiscriminate, disproportionate, and unjust measures against the professor were also deeply unfair to his students.
...
Posted inUncategorized | Taggedacademic freedom, governance, insubordination, managerialism, reputation, Thomas Docherty, Warwick University

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