Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 6/27/96  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.
 
Background

Employment History

  • Executive Assistant
    Sheriff
  • Chief Executive Officer
    Arpaio
  • Executive Assistant
    Arpaio
  • Member of Command Staff
    Arpaio
  • Chief Executive Officer
    Maricopa County Sheriff's Office
  • Chief
    Maricopa County Sheriff's Office
  • Reserve Officer
    Maricopa County Sheriff's Office
  • Manager
    Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • One-Time Mayor
    Soldotna

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Board Member
    Kenai Peninsula Foundation
55 Total References
Web References
The Shadiest Guns in the West « Arpaio.com
www.arpaio.com, 27 June 1996 [cached]
On Sundays, Sheriff Arpaio's executive assistant Tom Bearup preaches at a church in north Phoenix. He's a deeply religious man committed to the power of prayer. And it was during a prayer that he discovered his life's true calling. In 1980, God told Tom Bearup to run for mayor of Soldotna, a small Alaskan town where he had been a police officer for three years.
So he ran. And won. The experience exhilarated him and whetted his appetite for more. So, after moving back to his native Arizona, he volunteered to work for the Republican party. Bearup has since used his political contacts to land several jobs.
...
Bearup is an effusive, glad-handing person who resembles Danny DeVito.
...
Bearup says the early days of the Reagan administration were heady. He claims he'd made enough of an impression on the GOP from his remote mayoral seat in Alaska that he was considered for the ambassadorship to South Korea, where he had business contacts. He didn't get the post, but he says he liked having a White House connection. So when he moved to Phoenix after his term, he started working as an advance man for President Reagan.
He was also a reserve officer in the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office, sold real estate, and was a vice president of a company that wanted to develop business leads in Korea.
Then disaster struck. In January 1987, he was laid off when the foreign development project dried up. Sluggish real estate sales couldn't make up the difference.
Bearup found himself in serious straits, and he had many mouths to feed: seven children and a grandchild on the way. In February 1987, he stopped making payments on the mortgage of his Phoenix home.
Bearup says his lender told him he might qualify for a HUD program that would pay off his lender, take over his mortgage, and allow him to pay little or nothing while he got back on his feet.
He remembered that another Republican operative, Dwight Peterson, was with the Phoenix HUD office, so he called and inquired about the mortgage-assignment program. Bearup says Peterson referred him to another HUD employee who started the application process.
...
HUD investigators say the employee who handled Bearup's application reported that Peterson had warned him that Bearup's application "had better be handled properly, and he implied that if the mortgage was not accepted there could be problems because Bearup was well-connected politically.
...
HUD accepted Bearup for the assignment program in July 1987, suspending his mortgage payments through January 1988, and then extending that period through March 1988.
But Bearup would make no payments on his house for 25 months, from February 1987 to March 1989, when he sold it.
Under HUD rules, after the initial period of suspended payments, Bearup should have started making payments based on a formula that factored his income and debts. But Bearup complained that he couldn't make the payments calculated by HUD. "At that time," a loan specialist told investigators, "he told me of other liens which he had against the . . . property . . . I was of the opinion that he had not fully disclosed all of his liability information to HUD."
The specialist made repeated attempts to get more financial information from Bearup, but she said he never responded. Bearup's assignment was extended for an additional period to September 1988, when the loan specialist once again attempted to put Bearup on a payment plan.
By then, however, Bearup had applied for a job with HUD. He'd learned from his friend Peterson of an opening for a manager in the Tucson office. The loan specialist was told Bearup's file would be sent for servicing either to the regional office in San Francisco or to the head office in Washington, D.C. She never sent another payment-plan proposal to Bearup.
Besides making no payments on his mortgage-even after taking a $40,000-a-year job as manager of the Tucson HUD office-Bearup also asked HUD for permission to sell his property and allow the buyer to simply take over payments; he didn't want to bring payments up to date. He also asked that his original mortgage be extended by ten years.
...
Bearup claims that all of this was done without his knowledge, that if HUD employees such as his friend Dwight Peterson favored him because of his political status, it wasn't because Bearup had asked them to.
...
Red flags should have gone up at HUD: Bearup was no longer living in the house for which he was receiving HUD assistance; he now had a $40,000 salary with HUD, and he hadn't responded to HUD's repeated requests for financial data. Yet Bearup continued to make no payments on his Phoenix mortgage, and HUD did nothing about it.
The loan specialist told investigators that Bearup continually promised that he was about to sell the house and needed just a little more time.
"My impression of Bearup was that he was attempting to buy time by telling me that he had potential buyers . . . ," the loan specialist said.
"When he got a job with HUD, or if he moved out of the . . . property to Tucson, HUD should have taken those changed circumstances into consideration and adjusted his monthly mortgage payments accordingly or possibly even called his note due. But that did not happen."
Finally, in March 1989, Bearup found a buyer for his house and paid off HUD. Long after someone without HUD assistance would have lost the house to foreclosure, Bearup had managed to pay off his loan, and he even turned a $3,100 profit.
Bearup told investigators that he hadn't done anything wrong. As manager of a HUD office, however, he did admit that he should have been more concerned with appearances. He acknowledged that it didn't look good for a HUD official to fail to make payments on his mortgage and to refuse to supply financial information to HUD while the agency had bailed him out.
HUD investigators also examined Bearup's purchase, and subsequent abandonment, of a market and motel in the town of Strawberry. After he bought the property in July 1988, Bearup's wife and several of his children moved into the motel. Investigators charge that Bearup gave the sellers the impression he and his wife would purchase the market in their names, but a week after entering escrow, the Bearups formed a corporation to buy the property, borrowing money from Bearup's ex-wife to form the corporation and make the down payment on the market.
The market's owners told HUD investigators they felt deceived, especially after Bearup failed to inform them in writing that he held a real estate broker's license (such notification is required by law).
...
Tom Bearup claims that he was the one who had been deceived in the deal. The previous owner's sales projections were erroneous, he says. He says his actions did nothing to hasten their bankruptcy.
But HUD investigators noted that Bearup hadn't reported that he had borrowed $25,000 for the market (Bearup claimed that it was a corporate debt, and not his responsibility), nor did he report any proceeds or profits from the market-all while he was still withholding payments on his Phoenix home with a HUD-assigned mortgage.
HUD investigators were interested in other matters as well. After taking his job with HUD and moving to Tucson, Bearup told one of his clients-the Estes Corporation, a development firm that competed for HUD contracts-that he needed a larger house. The Estes employee mentioned that the company might be able to find him something.
Then, in January 1989, Bearup wrote a letter to the Pima County Planning Commission, criticizing the panel for requiring Estes to provide low-income housing in one of its proposed developments. Before he sent it, Bearup asked a subordinate to read the letter to an Estes representative to get his input. The Estes official suggested some slight changes, and the letter was sent to the commission.
The next month, Bearup rented a home from Estes for $850 per month-$400 per month less than the previous tenant had paid. HUD investigators noted that Bearup's check for move-in costs bounced.
Bearup explains that the previous tenant had paid more to have access
September « 2007 « Arpaio.com
www.arpaio.com [cached]
Arpaio's executive assistant, Tom Bearup, gets a whopping $76,000 to "coordinate public affairs activity," and two public information officers make $50,000 each to handle local press.
...
On Sundays, Sheriff Arpaio's executive assistant Tom Bearup preaches at a church in north Phoenix. He's a deeply religious man committed to the power of prayer. And it was during a prayer that he discovered his life's true calling. In 1980, God told Tom Bearup to run for mayor of Soldotna, a small Alaskan town where he had been a police officer for three years.
So he ran. And won. The experience exhilarated him and whetted his appetite for more. So, after moving back to his native Arizona, he volunteered to work for the Republican party. Bearup has since used his political contacts to land several jobs.
...
Bearup is an effusive, glad-handing person who resembles Danny DeVito.
...
Bearup says the early days of the Reagan administration were heady. He claims he'd made enough of an impression on the GOP from his remote mayoral seat in Alaska that he was considered for the ambassadorship to South Korea, where he had business contacts. He didn't get the post, but he says he liked having a White House connection. So when he moved to Phoenix after his term, he started working as an advance man for President Reagan.
He was also a reserve officer in the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office, sold real estate, and was a vice president of a company that wanted to develop business leads in Korea.
Then disaster struck. In January 1987, he was laid off when the foreign development project dried up. Sluggish real estate sales couldn't make up the difference.
Bearup found himself in serious straits, and he had many mouths to feed: seven children and a grandchild on the way. In February 1987, he stopped making payments on the mortgage of his Phoenix home.
Bearup says his lender told him he might qualify for a HUD program that would pay off his lender, take over his mortgage, and allow him to pay little or nothing while he got back on his feet.
He remembered that another Republican operative, Dwight Peterson, was with the Phoenix HUD office, so he called and inquired about the mortgage-assignment program. Bearup says Peterson referred him to another HUD employee who started the application process.
...
HUD investigators say the employee who handled Bearup's application reported that Peterson had warned him that Bearup's application "had better be handled properly, and he implied that if the mortgage was not accepted there could be problems because Bearup was well-connected politically.
...
HUD accepted Bearup for the assignment program in July 1987, suspending his mortgage payments through January 1988, and then extending that period through March 1988.
But Bearup would make no payments on his house for 25 months, from February 1987 to March 1989, when he sold it.
Under HUD rules, after the initial period of suspended payments, Bearup should have started making payments based on a formula that factored his income and debts. But Bearup complained that he couldn't make the payments calculated by HUD. "At that time," a loan specialist told investigators, "he told me of other liens which he had against the . . . property . . . I was of the opinion that he had not fully disclosed all of his liability information to HUD."
The specialist made repeated attempts to get more financial information from Bearup, but she said he never responded. Bearup's assignment was extended for an additional period to September 1988, when the loan specialist once again attempted to put Bearup on a payment plan.
By then, however, Bearup had applied for a job with HUD. He'd learned from his friend Peterson of an opening for a manager in the Tucson office. The loan specialist was told Bearup's file would be sent for servicing either to the regional office in San Francisco or to the head office in Washington, D.C. She never sent another payment-plan proposal to Bearup.
Besides making no payments on his mortgage-even after taking a $40,000-a-year job as manager of the Tucson HUD office-Bearup also asked HUD for permission to sell his property and allow the buyer to simply take over payments; he didn't want to bring payments up to date. He also asked that his original mortgage be extended by ten years.
...
Bearup claims that all of this was done without his knowledge, that if HUD employees such as his friend Dwight Peterson favored him because of his political status, it wasn't because Bearup had asked them to.
...
Red flags should have gone up at HUD: Bearup was no longer living in the house for which he was receiving HUD assistance; he now had a $40,000 salary with HUD, and he hadn't responded to HUD's repeated requests for financial data. Yet Bearup continued to make no payments on his Phoenix mortgage, and HUD did nothing about it.
The loan specialist told investigators that Bearup continually promised that he was about to sell the house and needed just a little more time.
"My impression of Bearup was that he was attempting to buy time by telling me that he had potential buyers . . . ," the loan specialist said.
"When he got a job with HUD, or if he moved out of the . . . property to Tucson, HUD should have taken those changed circumstances into consideration and adjusted his monthly mortgage payments accordingly or possibly even called his note due. But that did not happen."
Finally, in March 1989, Bearup found a buyer for his house and paid off HUD. Long after someone without HUD assistance would have lost the house to foreclosure, Bearup had managed to pay off his loan, and he even turned a $3,100 profit.
Bearup told investigators that he hadn't done anything wrong. As manager of a HUD office, however, he did admit that he should have been more concerned with appearances. He acknowledged that it didn't look good for a HUD official to fail to make payments on his mortgage and to refuse to supply financial information to HUD while the agency had bailed him out.
HUD investigators also examined Bearup's purchase, and subsequent abandonment, of a market and motel in the town of Strawberry. After he bought the property in July 1988, Bearup's wife and several of his children moved into the motel. Investigators charge that Bearup gave the sellers the impression he and his wife would purchase the market in their names, but a week after entering escrow, the Bearups formed a corporation to buy the property, borrowing money from Bearup's ex-wife to form the corporation and make the down payment on the market.
The market's owners told HUD investigators they felt deceived, especially after Bearup failed to inform them in writing that he held a real estate broker's license (such notification is required by law).
...
Tom Bearup claims that he was the one who had been deceived in the deal. The previous owner's sales projections were erroneous, he says. He says his actions did nothing to hasten their bankruptcy.
But HUD investigators noted that Bearup hadn't reported that he had borrowed $25,000 for the market (Bearup claimed that it was a corporate debt, and not his responsibility), nor did he report any proceeds or profits from the market-all while he was still withholding payments on his Phoenix home with a HUD-assigned mortgage.
HUD investigators were interested in other matters as well. After taking his job with HUD and moving to Tucson, Bearup told one of his clients-the Estes Corporation, a development firm that competed for HUD contracts-that he needed a larger house. The Estes employee mentioned that the company might be able to find him something.
Then, in January 1989, Bearup wrote a letter to the Pima County Planning Commission, criticizing the panel for requiring Estes to provide low-income housing in one of its proposed developments. Before he sent it, Bearup asked a subordinate to read the letter to an Estes representative to get his input. The Estes official suggested some slight changes, and the letter was sent to the commission.
The next month, Bearup rented a home from Estes for $850 per month
The trials of Tom Bearup: ...
www.arpaio.com [cached]
The trials of Tom Bearup: Joe Arpaio's former right-hand
...
The trials of Tom Bearup: Joe Arpaio's former right-hand
...
Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2008 12:08 am Post subject: The trials of Tom Bearup: Joe Arpaio's former right-hand
...
The trials of Tom Bearup: Joe Arpaio's former right-hand man tells all.
...
Former MCSO honcho Tom Bearup with his wife Adele, from Brendan Joel Kelley's feature on him in the Anchorage Press.
From the mythical land of grizzly bears and sockeye salmon comes this gripping portrait of former Arpaio henchman turned Arpaio foe Tom Bearup, penned by ex-New Times writer Brendan Joel Kelley.
...
Bearup, too, lives in Alaska now, which may be where we'll all have to move if Arpaio wins reelection once again.
...
Bearup ended up running against Arpaio after leaving the MCSO.
...
Bearup and his wife Adele eventually gave up on AZ, heading north to AK, and freedom from fear.
...
Overall, Bearup comes across as a sympathetic though flawed character, and there are interesting insights here into Joe's oppressive reign.
...
Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2008 12:14 am Post subject: Re: The trials of Tom Bearup: Joe Arpaio's former right-hand
...
Tom Bearup's been through hell-he fought a corrupt sheriff that he helped to elect, and suffered the wrath of the law enforcement administration he helped create; then his son was sentenced to death for a murder that Tom believes he's innocent of.Now an ordained minister, he's building a church and a home for unwed mothers in Soldotna, and praying he can help others to get to Heaven.
...
Tom Bearup's journey through hell began with the pink underwear.
Along the way, Bearup's been many things.He was the mayor of Soldotna.He was once right-hand man to the Arizona lawman who calls himself the toughest sheriff in America.He was a whistleblower who eventually took on that same sheriff.He was a politician who ran against his former boss twice and lost, suffering the legendarily vindictive sheriff's wrath.
He's also the father of a skinhead convicted of murder who now sits on Arizona's death row.
And not least of all, Tom Bearup is a man of God-who God called back to Soldotna to build a church.
He and his wife of 32 years, Adele, sit at the dining room table in their modest house off the Sterling Highway, telling the story of how they ended up in Soldotna for the second time.This is Tom Bearup's home now.But the Valley of Death he journeyed through on the way back to Soldotna begins in Phoenix, with the pink underwear.
...
Bearup was raised in Phoenix, and besides having been a police officer in and mayor of Soldotna, he was a longtime Republican operative.He worked with the Reagan administration, and was once nominated to be the U.S. ambassador to South Korea.
...
After Arpaio was elected, Bearup became an executive officer in the new sheriff's office.
...
In the process, Bearup helped forge Arpaio's mythic persona-that of "America's Toughest Sheriff," a title later made famous by a January 1996 profile in Penthouse magazine (and also the title of Arpaio's 1996 book).
...
"I'm so embarrassed that I've ever had the relationship I had with Joe Arpaio, because I helped him get to where he's at," confesses Bearup.
...
David Hendershott-who later replaced Bearup as Arpaio's most trusted aide and is still Arpaio's Chief Deputy-was entrusted with large amounts of cash from those pink underwear sales.
...
Bearup didn't know if money was missing, but the administration refused to investigate.
"I'm hearing that someone's stealing some money," Bearup remembers.
...
It was Bearup who first informed Arpaio about the death.
...
The sheriff's office quickly exonerated itself of any wrongdoing, but Bearup knew better.
...
The incident was pivotal for Tom Bearup.He was losing his faith in the integrity of his own law enforcement office.
...
"I left the sheriff's office by my choice," Tom Bearup says.
He quit his job on September 8, 1997, and soon after gave a deposition for a lawsuit against the sheriff's office by Gary Josephson, a former employee suing over his termination.
In the deposition, given to Phoenix attorney Nick Hentoff, Bearup said that Arpaio was using his posses to raise funds for a campaign for governor (a campaign that never materialized), and that money from the sales of the novelty pink underwear wasn't accounted for.
...
"[Arpaio] was angry," Bearup says in the deposition.
...
According to testimony from a former deputy in an unrelated lawsuit, not only was Bearup and his family under surveillance but their phone was tapped as well. (The allegations led to an FBI investigation, which proved inconclusive.)
In late April of 1999, Maricopa County detention officer David Cool sent a letter to then-county attorney Rick Romley, stating that David Hendershott had ordered him to produce a false memo stating that Tom Bearup was plotting to attack the sheriff's office with explosives.
...
"He wanted me to create a legal form, that would falsely accuse Tom Bearup of illegal activity," Cool wrote, according to a Phoenix New Times story about Cool by Tony Ortega in May of 1999.
...
Cool had attended the Phoenix church where Tom Bearup lived and preached, and Hendershott quizzed Cool extensively about the goings on of the congregation, according to Cool's letter.
...
Bearup went on to run unsuccessfully against Arpaio in both 2000 and 2004, despite Arpaio's attempts to peg him as a criminal.
...
Bearup's descriptions of Sheriff Arpaio's alleged abuses of power both in his administration and against Bearup himself sound like the rantings of a disgruntled employee, unless you know Arpaio.
...
The Press tried to ask Arpaio about his relationship with Bearup, but his spokesperson, Lisa Allen MacPherson, said, "I know he won't talk to you about that.
...
He doesn't have a lot of good things to say about Tom."
...
Arpaio's harassment was only the beginning of Tom Bearup's troubles though.
...
Tom Bearup officiated Fiedler's wedding while he was incarcerated.
Tom Bearup maintains that his son wasn't involved with white supremacists until that stint in prison.
...
Tom Bearup's first wife had been Korean, and Patrick has two half-siblings that are half Korean.
...
Tom says that, with his assurances that he'd stand behind his son, Patrick eventually did break away from the skinheads after his release from prison.
...
But this is where Tom and Adele Bearup's version of events differs greatly from law enforcement and hate group investigators' accounts.
...
Tom, Adele and Patrick Bearup all maintain Patrick's innocence, and all swear that Patrick was in his parents' home the night the murder occurred.
...
"My son is innocent," Tom Bearup, a lawman for most of his life, says emphatically at his kitchen table in Soldotna.We know because he had to come into our house, he had to turn the alarm off.You know what the prosecutor said about that?He said, ‘that's a theory.' He said, ‘these are his parents, they basically would lie for him.' He goes, ‘My theory is he never came home at all.He never spent the night in that bed.'"
...
"He's a cop's kid," Tom says.
...
Tom and Adele pray and believe that Patrick will be exonerated and join them in Soldotna.
...
Patrick's sentence of death came on February 2, 2007, Tom Bearup's 60th birthday.
In 1975, Tom Bearup decided he wanted to die.
...
Sitting in a restaurant named Gladys's with a firefighter buddy, Tom saw a hot chick come in on the arm of another guy."I'm going to marry that girl some day," he remembers telling his friend.His friend laughed and said, "Yeah, everybody wants to marry her."
Tom married Adele within the year.
...
While a cop in Soldotna, Tom applied to be chief of police, but didn't get the job.He looked into running for the city council, but says he never felt peaceful about that path.
...
While Tom was still working in Arpaio's administration they were accepted into the Arizona College of the Bible and became ordained ministers.The Bearups bought a chu
Barnes claimed that Arpaio's ...
www.flinttalk.com, 5 June 2012 [cached]
Barnes claimed that Arpaio's office wiretapped former Arpaio aide Tom Bearup and that it had targeted County Attorney Rick Romley for surveillance.
...
Bearup, W. Steven Martin and Dan Saban, all running for sheriff against Arpaio this year, have also reported that they have been followed and harassed by sheriff's deputies.
Arpaio's Ex-Chief Executive ...
www.arpaio.com, 27 July 2007 [cached]
Arpaio's Ex-Chief Executive Officer Tom Bearup was even more explicit. "Joe [Arpaio] knows everything that goes on," Bearup said.
Other People with the name "Bearup":
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.