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Wrong Thomas Angelini?

Thomas Ettor Angelini

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Assistant Professor MECHANICAL / AEROSPACE ENG


Assistant Professor

University of Florida


Web References(12 Total References)


3dfabprint.com

Tommy Angelini, a University of Florida researcher explores different techniques for 3D printing and has invented a method for manufacturing materials as soft as a cloud.


www.floridatrend.com

Thomas Angelini, an assistant professor in the University of Florida's mechanical and aerospace engineering department, has found a way for the printers to make soft, pliable objects.


3dfabprint.com

Tommy Angelini, a University of Florida researcher explores different techniques for 3D printing and has invented a method for manufacturing materials as soft as a cloud.
The discovery opens the door to a brand-new discipline in mechanical engineering quite different from the traditional engineering methods. Angelini came up with the idea to use microscopic hydrogel particles as a medium for 3D printing of soft matter. These particles are 99.8% water and 20 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. He found that he could manufacture soft materials into shapes more fragile than anything found in nature, all with structural integrity. Printing a soft object in three dimensions was impossible till now because, by its nature, 3D printing requires an object to solidify layer by layer, with the printing tip depositing a material such as a plastic or metal, which hardens to provide its own support. A top-heavy object like a jellyfish, for instance, would be too soft to print using traditional 3-D methods because the thin tentacles on the bottom would not support the bulk at the top. Even if the jellyfish was printed upside down the thin, flexible legs could never stay still in a fluid or stand upright Angelini tried 3D printing in a medium of densely packed, microscopic hydrogel particles, or granular gel for short. The granular gel provides a stable, water-based environment that provides support for soft objects. As the printing tip injects a fluid into the granular gel, the gel traps the fluid in place, allowing for deposition of subsequent layers of fluid, without regard for support. Angelini has used the new method to create numerous objects, including a jellyfish and a hollow, tubular knot, which could not be printed outside the granular gel environment.


www.bloomberg.com

The relative simplicity of the process means it will allow others to build on the innovation, said Tommy Angelini, a University of Florida professor whose lab recently published a similar method for engineering complex tissues.
He wasn't involved in Feinberg's research. "It's a very accessible, versatile method," Angelini said. Cooking up tissues that can be implanted into patients remains a challenge for the future. "That's going to happen eventually, but there's still so much fundamental science to be done," Angelini said.


aciantechnologies.com [cached]

The implications for biological processes are very surprising, said the lead author, Thomas E. Angelini, a former postdoctoral researcher at SEAS and now an assistant professor at the University of Florida.


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