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Thomas E. Angelini

Assistant Professor

University of Florida

HQ Phone:  (904) 588-1800

Direct Phone: (352) ***-****direct phone

Email: t***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Florida

2015 North Jefferson Street

Jacksonville, Florida,32206

United States

Company Description

The University of Florida prides itself on its research facilities and encourages all students to partake, even during their freshman and sophomore years. For the 2015-2016 school year, UF received a record $724 million in funding for research projects. The sc...more

Web References(15 Total References)


Scientists announce a method for 3D printing objects out of living human cells | ALGIX-3D

algix3d.com [cached]

To address the problem, the team of researchers, led in part by Thomas Angelini, assistant professor in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of Florida, took advantage of the physical properties of a commercially available granular hydrogel made up of 7µm-wide particles (Carbopol EDT 2020).
The gel, similar to common hand sanitizer, minus alcohol and perfume, is able to rapidly switch from a solid to liquid state in response to stress. Angelini likens this effect to the way that sugar can appear both solid and fluid depending on physical impact: "Stick your finger down there, drag it through, those grains can flow. "Whatever it is that comes out of the nozzle is trapped in space wherever we place it," explained Angelini. "So 3D printing is no longer a game of making a solid material that has to support itself; it's now a game of trapping stuff in space and leaving it wherever you want to put it." Angelini explains that the concept of embedded 3D printing - a material being printed into a liquid or solid substance rather than empty space - is something researchers have been trying to perfect for years, and for good reason. "It changes the way you think about 3D printing," he says. "It goes from being about melting certain materials and limiting yourself to structures that can't collapse while being printed to just placing those objects in 3D space wherever you want. And so long as you can push a material out of a needle-and have it be trapped by the [matrix]-there's no limit to what you could print with." Over the past year, the team has used the machine to 3D print complex shapes shapes with seven different types of living cells, including primary cells grown from a patient. Angelini and co were able to produce a kind of silicone jellyfish and suspended networks of veins written entirely out of living human aortic cells.


Council for the Advancement of Science Writing | To increase the public understanding of science

www.casw.org [cached]

Thomas E. Angelini
assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering University of Florida Tommy Angelini's Bio and Soft Matter Lab at UF hopes to discover how system-level properties of large groups of cells-epithelial layers, endothelial networks and bacterial biofilms-emerge from microscopic dynamics. his is the latest focus of a research career that has combined molecular biophysics with cell mechanics, including the study of physical interactions between the cornea, the eyelid, and contact lenses mediated by synthetic and biological macromolecules. Angelini received his PhD in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and moved into cell mechanics and the physics of bacterial biofilm growth during postdoctoral research in the Weitzlab at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences before joining the UF faculty in 2010.


ASB 2012

www.asbweb.org [cached]

Thomas Angelini, University of Florida


Extracellular matrix identified as key to spreading in biofilms. | Medicinezine.com - Reviews and articles in Wellness & Lifestyle, Child & Teen Health, Women’s Health, Men's Health, Mental Health, Natural Medicine, Drugs and Medication, Sexual Health.

medicinezine.com [cached]

Seminara, Brenner, and Weitz worked with Thomas Angelini, an assistant professor at the University of Florida and a former member of the Weitz lab; James Wilking, a SEAS research associate in applied chemistry; Senan Ebrahim '12, an undergraduate at Harvard; and Kolter and Hera Vlamakisof Harvard Medical School.


3dfabprint.com

Tommy Angelini, a University of Florida researcher explores different techniques for 3D printing and has invented a method for manufacturing materials as soft as a cloud.


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