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This profile was last updated on 7/27/13  and contains information from public web pages.

Dr. Theresa Chinnery

Wrong Dr. Theresa Chinnery?

Clinical Neuropsychologist

Phone: (920) ***-****  HQ Phone
Local Address: Menasha, Wisconsin, United States
ThedaCare Inc
122 E College Ave
Appleton, Wisconsin 54912
United States

Company Description: ThedaCare At Work provides a unique choice for companies and their employees when it comes to occupational health, employee assistance, and health and productivity...   more
Background

Education

  • PhD
  • doctorate , clinical psychology
    Central Michigan University
  • bachelor's degree , Psychology and Human Development
    University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
  • PhD.
7 Total References
Web References
Dementia is a clinical diagnosis, says ...
www.wausaudailyherald.com, 6 Dec 2011 [cached]
Dementia is a clinical diagnosis, says Dr. Theresa Chinnery, a clinical neuropsychologist at ThedaCare Behavioral Health.
...
"We oxidize," Chinnery said.
...
But, when it really starts to impact your functioning on a daily basis is when it's more of an issue," Chinnery said.
To diagnose dementia or a mild cognitive impairment, doctors use clinical neuropsychology, an applied science focusing on the clinical connection between the brain and central nervous system and cognitive and behavioral functioning.
"We can correctly identify when someone has a dementia or mild cognitive impairment and we can identify when they don't, which is important, too," Chinnery said.
...
impairment, and that's sort of, in many cases, the transition state between normal aging and a possible dementia," Chinnery said.
Less than 47 percent of those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment
go on to develop dementia, Chinnery said. But "a lot of people either stay the same or get better because you can do some things (via treatment) with mild cognitive impairment."
There is a distinct pattern of performance on measures of cognitive
functions (neuropsychological tests) together with a comprehensive review of the clinical history and behaviors, along with a neurological examination, that makes the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type accurate, Chinnery said.
How accurate are the tests?
Alzheimer's disease, Chinnery said, can be diagnosed with 97 percent sensitivity and 100 percent specificity.
...
"So there's got to be other factors going on there, like the environment," Chinnery said.
...
But, whatever is good for your heart, Chinnery said, is good for the brain.
...
"What those meds are designed to do is prevent decline," Chinnery said.
...
"For the most part, we have medications that can add years to functioning," Chinnery said.
Dementia is a clinical diagnosis, said ...
www.greenbaypressgazette.com [cached]
Dementia is a clinical diagnosis, said Dr. Theresa Chinnery, a clinical neuropsychologist at ThedaCare Behavioral Health.
...
"We oxidize," Chinnery said.
...
But, when it really starts to impact your functioning on a daily basis is when it's more of an issue," Chinnery said.
...
"We have normal aging that occurs and then we have mild cognitive impairment, and that's sort of, in many cases, the transition state between normal aging and a possible dementia," Chinnery said.
Less than 47 percent of those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment go on to develop dementia, Chinnery said. But "a lot of people either stay the same or get better because you can do some things (via treatment) with mild cognitive impairment."
There is a distinct pattern of performance on measures of cognitive functions (neuropsychological tests) together with a comprehensive review of the clinical history and behaviors, along with a neurological examination, that makes the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type accurate, Chinnery said.
Alzheimer's disease, Chinnery said, can be diagnosed with 97 percent sensitivity and 100 percent specificity.
...
"So there's got to be other factors going on there, like the environment," Chinnery said.
...
But, whatever is good for your heart, Chinnery said, is good for the brain.
...
"What those meds are designed to do is prevent decline," Chinnery said.
...
"For the most part, we have medications that can add years to functioning," Chinnery said.
...
Chinnery also doesn't like to use stages. After testing, she talks to patients about their patterns and strengths and what areas are more of a weakness.
ThedaCare
www.thedacare.org, 18 Jan 2007 [cached]
Dr. Chinnery
...
ThedaCare is pleased to welcome clinical neuropsychologist Theresa L. Chinnery, PhD.A native of northeastern Wisconsin, Dr. Chinnery, has been seeing patients of all ages at ThedaCare Behavioral Health and the Alzheimer's Center of Excellence since January 2, 2007.
Dr. Chinnery is a licensed psychologist whose special interests include brain injury, pervasive developmental disorders and mild cognitive impairment.She received her bachelor's degree in Psychology and Human Development from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and her doctorate in clinical psychology at Central Michigan University.She also completed an American Psychological Association accredited internship at the Illiana Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Danville, Ill., and a post-doctoral residency in Neuropsychology at the Prevea Health Neurology Department, partnered with the NeuroScience Center at St. Vincent Hospital in Green Bay.
As a clinical neuropsychologist, Dr. Chinnery's expertise is in the relationship between the brain and central nervous system, and cognitive/behavioral functioning.
"I enjoy using my expertise in neurocognitive functioning to help patients improve their lives and reach their full potential," Dr. Chinnery said.
Dr. Chinnery can be reached at ThedaCare Behavioral Health and the Alzheimer's Center of Excellence at (920) 720-2300.
Theresa Chinnery, PhD ...
www.thedacare.org, 25 Feb 2013 [cached]
Theresa Chinnery, PhD
In January 2007, Aline was diagnosed ...
www.greenbaypressgazette.com [cached]
In January 2007, Aline was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and referred to ThedaCare Behavioral Health clinical neuropsychologist Dr. Theresa Chinnery, who confirmed the diagnosis.
"She had been having some difficulty almost two years before that, with occasional word-finding difficulties, getting turned around driving or misplacing objects more of a problem," said Chinnery, who since then has seen Aline once a year. "It was good that she recognized she was having some difficulties back then and came in to have it looked at."
By 2009, Aline had progressed to moderate cognitive impairment and vascular dementia. And this past June, she was diagnosed with full Alzheimer's.
Aline's past memories remain vivid, said Chinnery, who compares dementia patients' ability to recall the past to an onion.
"You can't lay down new layers now; you don't have the ability to lay more layers of the onion on," she said.
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