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Tanja Pak

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Resident Fellow

Creative Glass Center of America


Web References(1 Total References)


www.creativeglasscenter.com

Tanja Pak Tanja Pak obtained a BA degree in Industrial Design at The Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana in 1994 and, later, a Master's Degree in Ceramics and Glass at The Royal College of Art, London. She was the recipient of a scholarship to Pilchuck Glass School in 1999.At present, she is a freelance artist in Ljubljana, Slovenia, working out of her own studio. Click here to read an essay by Robin Rice about Tanja Pak and her CGCA Fellowship experience.It's about a whole attitude," explains Tanja Pak, a fall 2001 Resident Fellow at the Creative Glass Center of America.The Slovenian glass artist conscientiously maintains an impeccable level of quality in her heavy schedule of international installations, exhibitions, and industrial design commissions.But not everything can be planned.Pak didn't plan to be a glass blower like her grandfather and uncles in the glass-making town of Rogaska Slatina.She didn't even want to be a glass designer like her father, although she felt the pull of her family's creativity.As a student, she chose the broad field of industrial design--deliberately avoiding a concentration on glass.Nevertheless, blood or tradition won out.Although it took nearly a decade of studying industrial design in the city of Ljubljana, Pak ultimately recognized that glass was destined to be central to her work as designer and artist.After additional study at the Royal College of Art in London, a leading institution for today's young artists, Pak returned to Slovenia to realize her own functional designs in factory production and to incorporate glass in ambitious multi media installations typically with an architectural orientation.Pak says she is the first artist to use cast glass as a large scale sculptural art material in Slovenia, an irony, she points out, since commercial glass production has been a major source of trade in Slovenia since sophisticated techniques of glass blowing were introduced by 17th century Venetians. In 1998 Pak completed her first important group of large scale installations in medieval Ljubljana Castle.Her role as artist is largely conceptual and administrative, as she orchestrates the work of a variety of specialists.At the castle, Pak incorporated sound and lighting in works like Voyage, a row of glass rings traversing a 30 meter barrel vault and pierced by a blue laser beam which she describes as "a non material axis."At around $400 an hour, "the laser was very expensive," she says, "but I wanted blue and nothing else."For Pak, a certain kind of turquoise or, in glass, a copper blue has a magical quality."It breathes," she says."I wouldn't use the word ‘spiritual' but it's different than any other color."She finds the darker cobalt blue, a much more common color in glass, "heavy and closed.It's just not glass anymore."While Voyage represented an "infinite journey," Always, a spiraling lighted column of three-sided flat cast crystal units, recapitulated the visitor's journey, and perhaps life's journey as well, while providing a static point at the end of the visitors' movement through the exhibition. "The exhibition is a path," Pak said, referring to all her installation work.


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