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2006-06-11T00:00:00.000Z

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Quoting

Background Information

Employment History

HSSE and ER Director

BP p.l.c

Vice President, Health, Safety, and Environment

NatureServe

BLM Head

Albuquerque Journal

Vice President

Forest Guardians

Director of Finance and Management

City of

Affiliations

Assistant Secretary
Interior for Lands and Mineral Resources

Deputy Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management
WhoRunsGov.com

Deputy Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management
Salazar's Agency

Board Member
Marine Preservation Association

Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, Discussed Ongoing Changes
American Recreation Coalition

Executive Secretary
New Mexico Cattle Growers' Association

Board Member
National Women's Law Center

Assistant Secretary
Lands and Minerals

Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management
eParka.com

Assistant Secretary, Lands and Minerals Management
Departmentof

Acting Director
Bureau of Land Management

Assistant Secretary
Department of the Interior

Deputy Assistant Secretary of Lands and Minerals Management
U.S. Department of the Interior

Board Member On the California Climate Action Registry, Natural Resources Council of America
University of Colorado Natural Resources School of Law

Education

Bachelor of University Studies

master's degree
Public Administration and Finance
University of New Mexico

Web References (198 Total References)


RV News Feature

www.rvnews.net [cached]

Sylvia Baca, assistant secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, discussed ongoing changes at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with recreation community leaders during a recent appearance at the American Recreation Coalition's (ARC) Recreation Exchange.

"Recreation is becoming a big part of what we do in BLM," she said, noting also that recreation is increasingly important to the American people.She pointed out that the "magnificent recreation opportunities" on BLM lands are no longer located far from where people live.Instead, as the West continues to grow rapidly, two thirds of BLM lands are within an hour's drive of a major population center."We are in the backyard of these communities," she said.
At the same time that recreation is becoming increasingly important within the BLM, Ms. Baca explained that "a new chapter in BLM history is being written - a conservation chapter.
Acknowledging that in earlier years, the BLM had been known, with some justification, as the "Bureau of Livestock and Mining," she stated that the agency was developing a new reputation under President Clinton and Interior Secretary Babbitt as a versatile agency that both manages use and conserves resources.Since 1996, when the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was designated, a total of seven National Monuments have been designated on BLM lands, amounting to 15% of the BLM land base.Quoting President Clinton, Ms. Baca characterized the designations as "not about locking up lands, but freeing them up from the pressures of development and sprawl from now into the future."
Up until 1996, she explained, the National Park Service had been the agency that managed National Monuments.However, the designation of the BLM as the manager of Grand Staircase-Escalante was "the beginning of a new management ethic and challenge" for the agency.Subsequently, she reported, the BLM has established a National Landscape Conservation System, which now includes eight Congressionally designated National Conservation Areas as well as the seven National Monuments.
Ms. Baca emphasized that while there will be some management guidance from the national level, the primary management responsibility for these areas will remain an "on-the-ground-function."
Ms. Baca also commented on the BLM's off-highway vehicle (OHV) strategy.She noted that in January 2000, the agency had announced plans to develop a national strategy on OHV's.She explained that OHV use on BLM lands had increased significantly while agency resources and staff had not kept pace.In addition, land-use plans that had been prepared 20 years ago, when OHV use was comparatively low and the vehicles were less sophisticated, were now out of date.Also complicating the management picture was the four-fold increase in the number of threatened and endangered species identified on BLM lands.The BLM is legally required to protect habitat for these species, she reminded the group.As a result of these changes, as well as litigation, "there is a need for a new structure," she stated.She emphasized that the agency is looking for ideas and comments on OHV management from the public and had been holding a series of "listening" meetings in the West.Comments were to be accepted through August and, following their analysis, management guidelines are expected to be issued by the end of November.Ms. Baca emphasized that the strategy would be implemented at the local level, in partnership with local governments and user groups.


RV News Feature

www.rv-news.com [cached]

Sylvia Baca, assistant secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, discussed ongoing changes at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with recreation community leaders during a recent appearance at the American Recreation Coalition's (ARC) Recreation Exchange.

"Recreation is becoming a big part of what we do in BLM," she said, noting also that recreation is increasingly important to the American people.She pointed out that the "magnificent recreation opportunities" on BLM lands are no longer located far from where people live.Instead, as the West continues to grow rapidly, two thirds of BLM lands are within an hour's drive of a major population center."We are in the backyard of these communities," she said.
At the same time that recreation is becoming increasingly important within the BLM, Ms. Baca explained that "a new chapter in BLM history is being written - a conservation chapter.
Acknowledging that in earlier years, the BLM had been known, with some justification, as the "Bureau of Livestock and Mining," she stated that the agency was developing a new reputation under President Clinton and Interior Secretary Babbitt as a versatile agency that both manages use and conserves resources.Since 1996, when the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was designated, a total of seven National Monuments have been designated on BLM lands, amounting to 15% of the BLM land base.Quoting President Clinton, Ms. Baca characterized the designations as "not about locking up lands, but freeing them up from the pressures of development and sprawl from now into the future."
Up until 1996, she explained, the National Park Service had been the agency that managed National Monuments.However, the designation of the BLM as the manager of Grand Staircase-Escalante was "the beginning of a new management ethic and challenge" for the agency.Subsequently, she reported, the BLM has established a National Landscape Conservation System, which now includes eight Congressionally designated National Conservation Areas as well as the seven National Monuments.
Ms. Baca emphasized that while there will be some management guidance from the national level, the primary management responsibility for these areas will remain an "on-the-ground-function."
Ms. Baca also commented on the BLM's off-highway vehicle (OHV) strategy.She noted that in January 2000, the agency had announced plans to develop a national strategy on OHV's.She explained that OHV use on BLM lands had increased significantly while agency resources and staff had not kept pace.In addition, land-use plans that had been prepared 20 years ago, when OHV use was comparatively low and the vehicles were less sophisticated, were now out of date.Also complicating the management picture was the four-fold increase in the number of threatened and endangered species identified on BLM lands.The BLM is legally required to protect habitat for these species, she reminded the group.As a result of these changes, as well as litigation, "there is a need for a new structure," she stated.She emphasized that the agency is looking for ideas and comments on OHV management from the public and had been holding a series of "listening" meetings in the West.Comments were to be accepted through August and, following their analysis, management guidelines are expected to be issued by the end of November.Ms. Baca emphasized that the strategy would be implemented at the local level, in partnership with local governments and user groups.


RV News Feature

www.rv-news.com [cached]

Sylvia Baca, assistant secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, discussed ongoing changes at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with recreation community leaders during a recent appearance at the American Recreation Coalition's (ARC) Recreation Exchange.

"Recreation is becoming a big part of what we do in BLM," she said, noting also that recreation is increasingly important to the American people.She pointed out that the "magnificent recreation opportunities" on BLM lands are no longer located far from where people live.Instead, as the West continues to grow rapidly, two thirds of BLM lands are within an hour's drive of a major population center."We are in the backyard of these communities," she said.
At the same time that recreation is becoming increasingly important within the BLM, Ms. Baca explained that "a new chapter in BLM history is being written - a conservation chapter.
Acknowledging that in earlier years, the BLM had been known, with some justification, as the "Bureau of Livestock and Mining," she stated that the agency was developing a new reputation under President Clinton and Interior Secretary Babbitt as a versatile agency that both manages use and conserves resources.Since 1996, when the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was designated, a total of seven National Monuments have been designated on BLM lands, amounting to 15% of the BLM land base.Quoting President Clinton, Ms. Baca characterized the designations as "not about locking up lands, but freeing them up from the pressures of development and sprawl from now into the future."
Up until 1996, she explained, the National Park Service had been the agency that managed National Monuments.However, the designation of the BLM as the manager of Grand Staircase-Escalante was "the beginning of a new management ethic and challenge" for the agency.Subsequently, she reported, the BLM has established a National Landscape Conservation System, which now includes eight Congressionally designated National Conservation Areas as well as the seven National Monuments.
Ms. Baca emphasized that while there will be some management guidance from the national level, the primary management responsibility for these areas will remain an "on-the-ground-function."
Ms. Baca also commented on the BLM's off-highway vehicle (OHV) strategy.She noted that in January 2000, the agency had announced plans to develop a national strategy on OHV's.She explained that OHV use on BLM lands had increased significantly while agency resources and staff had not kept pace.In addition, land-use plans that had been prepared 20 years ago, when OHV use was comparatively low and the vehicles were less sophisticated, were now out of date.Also complicating the management picture was the four-fold increase in the number of threatened and endangered species identified on BLM lands.The BLM is legally required to protect habitat for these species, she reminded the group.As a result of these changes, as well as litigation, "there is a need for a new structure," she stated.She emphasized that the agency is looking for ideas and comments on OHV management from the public and had been holding a series of "listening" meetings in the West.Comments were to be accepted through August and, following their analysis, management guidelines are expected to be issued by the end of November.Ms. Baca emphasized that the strategy would be implemented at the local level, in partnership with local governments and user groups.


Washington, D.C. -- Sylvia ...

www.funoutdoors.com [cached]

Washington, D.C. -- Sylvia Baca, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, discussed ongoing changes at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with recreation community leaders during a recent appearance at the American Recreation Coalition's (ARC) Recreation Exchange."Recreation is becoming a big part of what we do in BLM," she said, noting also that recreation is increasingly important to the American people.She pointed out that the "magnificent recreation opportunities" on BLM lands are no longer located far from where people live.Instead, as the West continues to grow rapidly, two thirds of BLM lands are within an hour's drive of a major population center."We are in the backyard of these communities," she said.

At the same time that recreation is becoming increasingly important within the BLM, Ms. Baca explained that "a new chapter in BLM history is being written - a conservation chapter."Acknowledging that in earlier years, the BLM had been known, with some justification, as the "Bureau of Livestock and Mining," she stated that the agency was developing a new reputation under President Clinton and Interior Secretary Babbitt as a versatile agency that both manages use and conserves resources.Since 1996, when the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was designated, a total of seven National Monuments have been designated on BLM lands, amounting to 15% of the BLM land base.Quoting President Clinton, Ms. Baca characterized the designations as "not about locking up lands, but freeing them up from the pressures of development and sprawl from now into the future."Up until 1996, she explained, the National Park Service had been the agency that managed National Monuments.However, the designation of the BLM as the manager of Grand Staircase-Escalante was "the beginning of a new management ethic and challenge" for the agency.Subsequently, she reported, the BLM has established a National Landscape Conservation System, which now includes eight Congressionally designated National Conservation Areas as well as the seven National Monuments.Ms. Baca emphasized that while there will be some management guidance from the national level, the primary management responsibility for these areas will remain an "on-the-ground-function."
Ms. Baca also commented on the BLM's off-highway vehicle (OHV) strategy.She noted that in January 2000, the agency had announced plans to develop a national strategy on OHV's.She explained that OHV use on BLM lands had increased significantly while agency resources and staff had not kept pace.In addition, land-use plans that had been prepared 20 years ago, when OHV use was comparatively low and the vehicles were less sophisticated, were now out of date.Also complicating the management picture was the four-fold increase in the number of threatened and endangered species identified on BLM lands.The BLM is legally required to protect habitat for these species, she reminded the group.As a result of these changes, as well as litigation, "there is a need for a new structure," she stated.She emphasized that the agency is looking for ideas and comments on OHV management from the public and had been holding a series of "listening" meetings in the West.Comments were to be accepted through August and, following their analysis, management guidelines are expected to be issued by the end of November.Ms. Baca emphasized that the strategy would be implemented at the local level, in partnership with local governments and user groups.


Sylvia Baca, assistant ...

www.rvnews.com [cached]

Sylvia Baca, assistant secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, discussed ongoing changes at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with recreation community leaders during a recent appearance at the American Recreation Coalition's (ARC) Recreation Exchange.

"Recreation is becoming a big part of what we do in BLM," she said, noting also that recreation is increasingly important to the American people.She pointed out that the "magnificent recreation opportunities" on BLM lands are no longer located far from where people live.Instead, as the West continues to grow rapidly, two thirds of BLM lands are within an hour's drive of a major population center."We are in the backyard of these communities," she said.
At the same time that recreation is becoming increasingly important within the BLM, Ms. Baca explained that "a new chapter in BLM history is being written - a conservation chapter.
Acknowledging that in earlier years, the BLM had been known, with some justification, as the "Bureau of Livestock and Mining," she stated that the agency was developing a new reputation under President Clinton and Interior Secretary Babbitt as a versatile agency that both manages use and conserves resources.Since 1996, when the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was designated, a total of seven National Monuments have been designated on BLM lands, amounting to 15% of the BLM land base.Quoting President Clinton, Ms. Baca characterized the designations as "not about locking up lands, but freeing them up from the pressures of development and sprawl from now into the future."
Up until 1996, she explained, the National Park Service had been the agency that managed National Monuments.However, the designation of the BLM as the manager of Grand Staircase-Escalante was "the beginning of a new management ethic and challenge" for the agency.Subsequently, she reported, the BLM has established a National Landscape Conservation System, which now includes eight Congressionally designated National Conservation Areas as well as the seven National Monuments.
Ms. Baca emphasized that while there will be some management guidance from the national level, the primary management responsibility for these areas will remain an "on-the-ground-function."
Ms. Baca also commented on the BLM's off-highway vehicle (OHV) strategy.She noted that in January 2000, the agency had announced plans to develop a national strategy on OHV's.She explained that OHV use on BLM lands had increased significantly while agency resources and staff had not kept pace.In addition, land-use plans that had been prepared 20 years ago, when OHV use was comparatively low and the vehicles were less sophisticated, were now out of date.Also complicating the management picture was the four-fold increase in the number of threatened and endangered species identified on BLM lands.The BLM is legally required to protect habitat for these species, she reminded the group.As a result of these changes, as well as litigation, "there is a need for a new structure," she stated.She emphasized that the agency is looking for ideas and comments on OHV management from the public and had been holding a series of "listening" meetings in the West.Comments were to be accepted through August and, following their analysis, management guidelines are expected to be issued by the end of November.Ms. Baca emphasized that the strategy would be implemented at the local level, in partnership with local governments and user groups.

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