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This profile was last updated on 9/28/12  and contains information from public web pages.
Johns Hopkins University
242 Garland Hall 3400 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21218
United States

Company Description: The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing is a global leader in nursing research, education and scholarship and is ranked among the top 10 nursing higher...   more
29 Total References
Web References
A team of astronomers led by ...
www.australiangeographic.com.au, 28 Sept 2012 [cached]
A team of astronomers led by Dr Suvi Gerzari of John Hopkins University in Baltimore, US, monitored hundreds of thousands of galaxies using orbiting space telescopes, which scan the entire night sky for all kinds of transient phenomena, including supernovae.
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Astronomers have previously spotted these stellar homicides; "[however], it is the first time we actually had enough detailed information that we can determine what kind of star was torn apart by a black hole and how big the black hole was that did it," Suvi says.
This is the first such space feast observed from beginning to end, she adds, and "that is very exciting because that time scale is how we determine how big the black hole is".
Black hole caught "red-handed" in stellar homicide
www.world-science.net, 2 May 2012 [cached]
We are see­ing the glow from the stel­lar gas fall­ing in­to the black hole," said Gezari.
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Using a bevy of telescopes, a team of astronomers led by Suvi Gezari of The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. has identified that victim as a star rich in helium gas. The star resided in a galaxy 2.7 billion light-years away-a light year being the distance light travels in a year-according to the team's results, to be published in the May 3 online edition of the journal Nature. "When the star is ripped apart by the gravitational forces of the black hole, some part of the star's remains falls into the black hole, while the rest is ejected at high speeds. We are seeing the glow from the stellar gas falling into the black hole over time," said Gezari. "We're also witnessing the spectral signature of the ejected gas, which we find to be mostly helium. A spectral signature is a detailed breakdown by color of the light given off by some process; this can reveal which substances were present to begin with. It's like "gathering evidence from a crime scene," Gezari said. The observation also yields insights about the harsh environment around black holes and the types of stars swirling around them, she added. Gezari and her team think the hydrogen-filled layers surrounding the star's core was lifted off a long time ago by the same black hole, explaining why there is only helium left. The star may have been near the end of its life, the astronomers surmise. After consuming most of its hydrogen fuel, it had likely ballooned in size, becoming a so-called red giant. The astronomers think the bloated star was looping around the black hole in an elongated orbit, similar to a comet's around the sun. On one of its close approaches, the star was stripped of its puffed-up atmosphere by the black hole's powerful gravity. The stellar remains continued its journey around the center, until it ventured even closer to the black hole to face its ultimate demise. Astronomers have predicted that stripped stars circle the central black hole of our Milky Way galaxy, Gezari pointed out. These close encounters are rare, occurring roughly every 100,000 years. To find this one event, Gezari's team monitored hundreds of thousands of galaxies in ultraviolet light with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, a space-based observatory, and in visible light with the Pan-STARRS1 telescope on Mount Haleakala, Hawaii. In June 2010, they spotted a candidate event with both telescopes. They continued to monitor the flare as it reached peak brightness a month later, then slowly fadef over the next year. "The longer the event lasted, the more excited we got, since we realized that this is either a very unusual supernova [stellar explosion] or an entirely different type of event, such as a star being ripped apart by a black hole," said team member Armin Rest of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. By measuring the increase in brightness, the astronomers calculated the black hole's weight at roughly 3 million suns, which equals the weight of our Milky Way's black hole. "The glowing helium was a tracer for an extraordinarily hot accretion [infalling] event," Gezari said.
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"These observations also give us clues on what evidence to look for in the future to find this type of event," Gezari said.
Using a slew of ground and ...
www.eurekalert.org, 3 May 2012 [cached]
Using a slew of ground and space-based telescopes, a team of astronomers led by Suvi Gezari of The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, has identified the victim in this case as a star rich in helium gas.
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Suvi Gezari, team leader from John Hopkins University in Baltimore, alerted us to something unusual caught by the NASA spacecraft called GALEX, and as our computers sifted through terabytes of Pan-STARRS data, we found the tell-tale signature of the event.
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Team leader, Suvi Gezari from The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. said: "This is the first time where we have so many pieces of evidence, and now we can put them all together to weigh the perpetrator (the black hole) and determine the identity of the unlucky star that fell victim to it.
Using a slew of ground- and ...
www.newswise.com, 9 May 2012 [cached]
Using a slew of ground- and space-based telescopes, a team of astronomers led by Suvi Gezari of The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md., has identified the victim as a star rich in helium gas.
...
Because there is very little hydrogen and mostly helium in the gas we detect, we know from the carnage that the slaughtered star had to have been the helium-rich core of a stripped star," Gezari explained.
This observation yields insights about the harsh environment around black holes and the types of stars swirling around them.
This is not the first time the unlucky star had a brush with the behemoth black hole. Gezari and her team think the star's hydrogen-filled envelope surrounding its core was lifted off a long time ago by the same black hole. In their scenario, the star may have been near the end of its life.
...
Astronomers have predicted that stripped stars circle the central black hole of our Milky Way galaxy, Gezari pointed out. These close encounters, however, are rare, occurring roughly every 100,000 years. To find this one event, Gezari's team monitored hundreds of thousands of galaxies in ultraviolet light with NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), a space-based observatory, and in visible light with the Pan-STARRS1 telescope on the summit of Haleakala in Hawaii.
...
"The glowing helium was a tracer for an extraordinarily hot accretion event," Gezari said.
...
"This is the first time where we have so many pieces of evidence, and now we can put them all together to weigh the perpetrator (the black hole) and determine the identity of the unlucky star that fell victim to it," Gezari said.
...
Space Telescope Science Institute, Black Hole, tidal disruption, ultraviolet and optical flare, stellar accretion, PS1-10j, GALEX, Pan-STARRS1, Chandra, MMT, Armin Rest, Suvi Gezari
Black hole caught red-handed in a stellar homicide | School of Physics and Astronomy
www.ph.ed.ac.uk, 2 May 2012 [cached]
We are seeing the glow from the stellar gas falling into the black hole over time," research team leader Suvi Gezari, The Johns Hopkins University
"We're also witnessing the spectral signature of the ejected gas, which we find to be mostly helium," said research team leader Suvi Gezari, of The Johns Hopkins University.
...
Gezari and her team think the star's hydrogen-filled envelope surrounding the core was lifted off a long time ago by the same black hole.
...
Astronomers have predicted that stripped stars circle the central black hole of our Milky Way galaxy, Gezari pointed out. These close encounters, however, are rare, occurring roughly every 100,000 years.
Searching hundreds of thousands of galaxies
To find this one event, Gezari's team monitored hundreds of thousands of galaxies with the Pan-STARRS1 telescope on Mount Haleakala, Hawaii.
...
"The glowing helium was a tracer for an extraordinarily hot accretion event," Gezari said.
...
"This is the first time where we have so many pieces of evidence, and now we can put them all together to weigh the perpetrator (the black hole) and determine the identity of the unlucky star that fell victim to it," Gezari said.
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