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This profile was last updated on 5/20/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Susan D. Hovorka

Wrong Dr. Susan D. Hovorka?

Carbon-Sequestration Expert

University of Texas at Austin
1 University Station B6600
Austin, Texas 78712
United States

Company Description: The University of Texas at Austin, the largest component of The University of Texas System, is a major research university and home to more than 48,000 students,...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Co-Founder
    Gulf Coast Carbon Center

Education

  • Ph.D. , Geology
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • B.S.
    Earlham College
  • M.A.
    The University of Texas at Austin
125 Total References
Web References
Susan Hovorka, a geologist ...
www.scientificamerican.com, 17 Dec 2013 [cached]
Susan Hovorka, a geologist and carbon-sequestration expert at the University of Texas at Austin, says in certain conditions water deep below the surface could flow across the carbonate crystals and dissolve out the CO2, allowing the gas to possibly seep to the surface. Testing will be needed, she notes, to determine how well basalt will retain the carbon.
The layering "is a very strong ...
www.commondreams.org, 21 June 2012 [cached]
The layering "is a very strong phenomenon and it's on our side," said Susan Hovorka, a senior research scientist at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology.
CO2 Conference | Agenda
www.co2conference.net, 9 Dec 2013 [cached]
2:00 p.m. Demonstrating CO2 Storage - Dr. Sue Hovorka, Senior Research Scientist, Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin
SACROC, begun in 1972 in Scurry ...
www.gosanangelo.com [cached]
SACROC, begun in 1972 in Scurry County, is the earliest, large-scale project using carbon dioxide to tap into oil, Susan Hovorka, a research scientist studying carbon dioxide sequestration, said in an interview.
There are about 100 such projects in the United States, many going on for decades, said Hovorka, co-founder of the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, which is part of the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology.
"They have very good public acceptance, very good safety records," Hovorka said.
She said the center's research has shown the carbon dioxide stays where it's injected 5,000 to 10,000 feet underground.
Scientists have detected small leakages over short distances, such as 40 feet above an injection site, she said.
Two of her colleagues did a multiyear study at the Scurry County site because of concerns groundwater there had been damaged.
"The answer's clearly no. The water's fine," Hovorka said.
The center's funding sources include industry sponsors such as power companies, vendors and potential carbon dioxide users like oil and gas companies, as well as the U.S. Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Texas, she said.
HGS - Articles
devhgs2.schipul.net, 5 Feb 2009 [cached]
According to Sue Hovorka, principal investigator with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC), CO2 has been injected into the SACROC oil field in Scurry County, Texas since 1972. The GCCC, a research group within the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), with a wide range of industry sponsors including BP, Chevron, Shell ConocoPhillips, Marathon, and Schlumberger, has conducted three tests of geologic sequestration in Texas including two in the Frio Formation. The BEG has conducted a fourth test in Mississippi in the Tuscaloosa Formation where a fifth test is planned.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Since 1996, the Norwegian oil company Statoil has injected 10 million metric tons of CO2 into sandstone below the floor of the North Sea.
...
Sue Hovorka of the BEG pointed out several favorable conditions in Texas for future large-scale geologic sequestration projects including:
 
1.
...
According to Sue Hovorka, principal investigator with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC), CO2 has been injected into the SACROC oil field in Scurry County, Texas since 1972. The GCCC, a research group within the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), with a wide range of industry sponsors including BP, Chevron, Shell ConocoPhillips, Marathon, and Schlumberger, has conducted three tests of geologic sequestration in Texas including two in the Frio Formation. The BEG has conducted a fourth test in Mississippi in the Tuscaloosa Formation where a fifth test is planned. Since 1996, the Norwegian oil company Statoil has injected 10 million metric tons of CO2 into sandstone below the floor of the North Sea.
...
Sue Hovorka of the BEG pointed out several favorable conditions in Texas for future large-scale geologic sequestration projects including: 1. Oil and gas fields in decline.
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