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Wrong Sunni Amatullah?

Sunni Rumsey Amatullah

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Director of An HIV Prevention Program

Iris House


Director of HIV Prevention Services

Iris House


Web References(13 Total References)


Islam and New Zealand Muslim community

www.nzmuslim.net [cached]

"You should see my humanity, my compassion, my devotion to God coming through the surface, not my body," said Sunni Rumsey Amatullah, who became Muslim a quarter century ago."It is Allah talking to you directly," said Amatullah, 50, the director of an HIV prevention program at Iris House, a health-care organization in Harlem.She said she converted after leading a wildly hedonistic lifestyle for several years."It's a spiritual awakening.What happens is you're in a fog and you don't know you are in a fog, and when it clears up you say, ‘Hey, I thought it was clear back there,'" she said."My friend's husband gave me the Quran in my early 20s, because he thought I was too wild."At first, Amatullah said, she paid little attention, but she was profoundly affected when she started delving into the book.Still, it took about five years and a great deal of contemplation, she said, before she became truly interested in Islam and came to believe the Quran was the divine truth.She said she also was impressed by the rights women had under Islam in seventh-century Arabia, a time when women in most other cultures had virtually no power over their lives."You slowly adjust yourself to an Islamic way of life, thinking about God, doing good deeds," Amatullah said.Amatullah, who lives in St. Albans, has been married and divorced three times since she converted to Islam.Her first husband was from Sudan, the second was from Egypt and the third was Italian-American; all were Muslim.Allah gives both men and women the right to divorce, she said, and she initiated each split.Although the Quran does not prohibit women from gaining an education or having a career, the converts said, it is a woman's primary responsibility to take care of her children."To kill innocent lives," Amatullah said, "is anti-Islamic."


islamkashmir.org

"You should see my humanity, my compassion, my devotion to God coming through the surface, not my body," said Sunni Rumsey Amatullah, who became Muslim a quarter century ago.
"It is Allah talking to you directly," said Amatullah, 50, the director of an HIV prevention program at Iris House, a health-care organization in Harlem. She said she converted after leading a wildly hedonistic lifestyle for several years. "It's a spiritual awakening. What happens is you're in a fog and you don't know you are in a fog, and when it clears up you say, 'Hey, I thought it was clear back there,'" she said. "My friend's husband gave me the Quran in my early 20s, because he thought I was too wild." At first, Amatullah said, she paid little attention, but she was profoundly affected when she .started delving into the book. Still, it took about five years and a great deal of contemplation, she said, before she became truly interested in Islam and came to believe the Quran was the divine truth. She said she also was impressed by the rights women had under Islam in .seventh-century Arabia, a time when women in most other cultures had virtually no power over their lives. "You slowly adjust yourself to an Islamic way of life, thinking about God, doing good deeds," Amatullah said. Amatullah, who lives in St. Albans, has been married and divorced three times since she converted to Islam. Her first husband was from Sudan, the second was from Egypt and the third was Italian-American; all were Muslim. Allah gives both men and women the right to divorce, she said, and she ini.tiated each split. Although the Quran does not prohibit women from gaining an education or having a career, the converts said, it is a woman's primary responsibility to take care of her children. "To kill innocent lives," Amatullah said, "is anti- Islamic."


Amsterdam News - Article - health

www.amsterdamnews.org [cached]

Sunni Rumsey Amatullah, director of HIV Prevention Services at Iris House, talks to hundreds of women and sees firsthand how devastated their lives and families become upon learning they've contracted the disease.Recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control show HIV/AIDS is now the leading cause of death for African-American women ages 25 to 44. "The taboo of being HIV positive still exists within the African-American and Latino communities.It's our role to educate and empower these women to take care of themselves, because no one else will," Amatullah stated."And to successfully treat HIV, a woman needs housing, food – the basic necessities – before she can be successful with adhering to a drug regimen.We advocate for these women so that they can live healthier, longer lives."GlaxoSmithKline, one of the world's leading research-based pharmaceutical and health care companies, is committed to improving the quality of human life by enabling people to do more, feel better and live longer.


Islam and New Zealand Muslim community

www.nzmuslim.net [cached]

"You should see my humanity, my compassion, my devotion to God coming through the surface, not my body," said Sunni Rumsey Amatullah, who became Muslim a quarter century ago."It is Allah talking to you directly," said Amatullah, 50, the director of an HIV prevention program at Iris House, a health-care organization in Harlem.She said she converted after leading a wildly hedonistic lifestyle for several years."It's a spiritual awakening.What happens is you're in a fog and you don't know you are in a fog, and when it clears up you say, ‘Hey, I thought it was clear back there,'" she said."My friend's husband gave me the Quran in my early 20s, because he thought I was too wild."At first, Amatullah said, she paid little attention, but she was profoundly affected when she started delving into the book.


: ASP : EXPLORE : SISTERS : VEIL SYMBOLISES LIBERATION - Islamherald.com

www.islamherald.com [cached]

"You should see my humanity, my compassion, my devotion to God coming through the surface, not my body," said Sunni Rumsey Amatullah, who became a Muslim a quarter century ago.
It is Allah talking to you directly," said Amatullah, 50, the director of an HIV prevention program at Iris House, a health-care organisation in Harlem. She said she converted after leading a wildly hedonistic lifestyle for several years." "It is Allah talking to you directly," said Amatullah, 50, the director of an HIV prevention program at Iris House, a health-care organisation in Harlem. She said she converted after leading a wildly hedonistic lifestyle for several years. "It's a spiritual awakening. What happens is you are in a fog and you don't know you are in a fog, and when it clears up you say, 'Hey, I thought it was clear back there,'" she said. "My friend's husband gave me the Quran in my early 20s, because he thought I was too wild." At first, Amatullah said, she paid little attention, but she was profoundly affected when she started delving into the book. Still, it took about five years and a great deal of contemplation, she said, before she became truly interested in Islam and came to believe the Quran was the divine truth. She said she also was impressed by the rights women had under Islam in 7th century Arabia, a time when women in most other cultures had virtually no power over their lives. "You slowly adjust yourself to an Islamic way of life, thinking about God, doing good deeds," Amatullah said. "To kill innocent lives," Amatullah said, "is anti- Islamic."


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