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Wrong Steven Metro?

Steven M. Metro

Managing Clerk

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP

HQ Phone:  (212) 455-2000

Direct Phone: (212) ***-****direct phone

Email: s***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP

425 Lexington Avenue

New York City, New York,10017

United States

Company Description

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP (www.simpsonthacher.com) is one of the world's leading international law firms. The Firm was established in 1884 and has more than 900 lawyers. Headquartered in New York with offices in Beijing, Hong Kong, Houston, London, Los An...more

Web References(26 Total References)


Sec News, Stockbroker Attorney, Securities Arbitration, David A. Weintraub - Part 2

www.stockbrokerlitigation.com [cached]

The SEC alleged that Vladimir Eydelman and Steven Metro were linked through a mutual friend who acted as a middleman in the illegal trading scheme.
Metro, who worked at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett in New York, obtained material nonpublic information about corporate clients involved in pending deals by accessing confidential documents in the law firm's computer system. Metro typically tipped the middleman during in-person meetings at a New York City coffee shop, and the middleman later met Eydelman, who was his stockbroker, near the clock and information booth in Grand Central Terminal. The middleman allocated a portion of his profits for eventual payment back to Metro in exchange for the inside information. Metro also personally traded in advance of at least two deals. According to the SEC's complaint, the insider trading scheme began in early February 2009 at a bar in New York City when Metro met the middleman and other friends for drinks. When Metro and the middleman separated from the rest of their friends and began discussing stocks, the middleman expressed concern about his holdings in Sirius XM Radio and his fear that the company may go bankrupt. Metro divulged that Liberty Media Corp. planned to invest more than $500 million in Sirius, and said he obtained this information by viewing documents at the law firm where he worked. The middleman told Metro following the announcement that he had set aside approximately $7,000 for Metro as a "thank you" for the information. Instead of taking the money, Metro told the middleman to leave it in his brokerage account and invest it on Metro's behalf based on confidential information that he planned to pass him in the future. Also according to the SEC's complaint, Metro tipped and Eydelman traded on inside information about 12 more companies as they settled into a routine to cloak their illegal activities. Metro pointed to the names or ticker symbols to indicate which company was the acquirer and which was being acquired. Metro also conveyed the approximate price of the transaction and the approximate announcement date. The middleman's agreement with Metro resulted in more than $168,000 being apportioned to Metro as his share of profits from the insider trading scheme in addition to his profits from personally trading in advance of at least two transactions. The SEC's complaint charged Metro and Eydelman with violating Sections 10(b) and 14(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rules 10b-5 and 14e-3 as well as Section 17(a) of the Securities Act of 1933. The complaint is seeking a final judgment ordering Metro and Eydelman to pay disgorgement of their ill-gotten gains plus prejudgment interest and penalties, and permanent injunctions from future violations of these provisions of the federal securities laws.


Broker Pleads Guilty to Insider Trading with Information Stolen from Law Firm - Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti, LLP

www.pietragallo.com [cached]

According to the government, Tomayo obtained the inside information from a friend and former law school classmate, Steven Metro, who was the managing clerk of the New York office of Simpson Thacher and Bartlett, LLP.
The inside information disclosed by Metro related to corporate transactions, including mergers and acquisitions or tender offers, in which the law firm represented a party or financial advisor to the transaction. The government charged that Metro collected the inside information by scouring the law firm's computer systems using search terms relating to corporate transactions, as well as client names and client-matter numbers. Metro would then pass on the information to Tamayo in meetings at restaurants and coffee shops in Manhattan, providing, among other things, the names and/or ticker symbols of the companies whose securities should be purchased, the general timing of the planned deals, and information related to how the deals would affect the issuer's stock price once announced. After Tamayo received the inside information from Metro, Tamayo would meet with Eydelman and pass the information to him. The government charged that, after receiving the inside information provided by Metro, Eydelman would purchase securities for himself, family members, friends and clients, including Tamayo. The government estimates that by exploiting the information that Metro had stolen from the law firm, Eydelman and conspirators Metro and Tamayo netted more than $5.6 million in illicit profits. Metro has maintained his plea of not guilty and is scheduled to go to trial on February 8, 2016.


Vigilant Compliance, LLCSEC Charges Stockbroker and Law Firm Managing Clerk in $5.6 Million Insider Trading Scheme |

vigilantllc.com [cached]

The SEC alleges that Vladimir Eydelman and Steven Metro were linked through a mutual friend who acted as a middleman in the illegal trading scheme.
Metro, who works at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett in New York, obtained material nonpublic information about corporate clients involved in pending deals by accessing confidential documents in the law firm's computer system. Metro typically tipped the middleman during in-person meetings at a New York City coffee shop, and the middleman later met Eydelman, who was his stockbroker, near the clock and information booth in Grand Central Terminal. The middleman allocated a portion of his profits for eventual payment back to Metro in exchange for the inside information. Metro also personally traded in advance of at least two deals. In a parallel action, the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of New Jersey today announced criminal charges against Metro, who lives in Katonah, N.Y., and Eydelman, who lives in Colts Neck, N.J. According to the SEC's complaint filed in U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, the insider trading scheme began in early February 2009 at a bar in New York City when Metro met the middleman and other friends for drinks. When Metro and the middleman separated from the rest of their friends and began discussing stocks, the middleman expressed concern about his holdings in Sirius XM Radio and his fear that the company may go bankrupt. Metro divulged that Liberty Media Corp. planned to invest more than $500 million in Sirius, and said he obtained this information by viewing documents at the law firm where he worked. The middleman told Metro following the announcement that he had set aside approximately $7,000 for Metro as a "thank you" for the information. Instead of taking the money, Metro told the middleman to leave it in his brokerage account and invest it on Metro's behalf based on confidential information that he planned to pass him in the future. According to the SEC's complaint, Metro tipped and Eydelman traded on inside information about 12 more companies as they settled into a routine to cloak their illegal activities. Metro pointed to the names or ticker symbols to indicate which company was the acquirer and which was being acquired. Metro also conveyed the approximate price of the transaction and the approximate announcement date. The middleman's agreement with Metro resulted in more than $168,000 being apportioned to Metro as his share of profits from the insider trading scheme in addition to his profits from personally trading in advance of at least two transactions. The complaint seeks a final judgment ordering Metro and Eydelman to pay disgorgement of their ill-gotten gains plus prejudgment interest and penalties, and permanent injunctions from future violations of these provisions of the federal securities laws.


thetrustadvisor.com

Steven Metro, a former managing clerk at Simpson Thacher & [...]


Sentencing

www.securitiesdocket.com [cached]

Steven Metro, formerly managing law clerk at the BigLaw firm in New York, has been given a 46-month jail term by U.S. District Judge Michael Shipp in Trenton, [...]
Steven Metro, a former managing clerk at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, received his 46-month sentence [...]


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