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This profile was last updated on 12/3/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Mr. Steven E. Calvery

Wrong Steven E. Calvery?


Local Address:  Arlington , Virginia , United States
Pentagon Force Protection Agency
9000 Pentagon Pedestrian Tunnel
Washington , District of Columbia 20301
United States

Company Description: In response to the terrorist attack against the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, the Department of Defense established the Pentagon Force Protection Agency (PFPA)....   more

Employment History

  • Head
    Defense Force Protection Agency
62 Total References
Web References
Steven Calvery, head of the ..., 3 Dec 2013 [cached]
Steven Calvery, head of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, which handles security for the giant office building in Arlington, Virginia, has since asked employees to brush up on procedures for bringing in inoperable guns or disarmed explosives.
He wrote in a memo that it would be "helpful" to ensure workers are familiar with the "authorization process" as these items require written approval from his force, according to a defense official, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
The accused official is Steven E. ..., 5 Nov 2013 [cached]
The accused official is Steven E. Calvery, director of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency. The Pentagon said that Calvery has disputed the conclusions reached by the Pentagon inspector general.
The IG completed its report in February but did not make it public until Monday. It said Calvery had misused his position by arranging for a non-employee to use his agency's firing range and misused his subordinates by having them order and pick up his lunch and retrieve coffee for him.
The inspector general also substantiated allegations that Calvery improperly authorized time off for employees to attend a golf tournament and selected a subordinate for promotion based on their relationship rather than the subordinate's experience.
The IG began its investigation in response to two anonymous complaints about Calvery received in March 2011.
The Pentagon said Calvery, who has held his position since May 2006, declined further comment.
In its report, the inspector general recommended the Pentagon take unspecified "appropriate action" against Calvery. A Pentagon spokesman, Air Force Lt.
The latest evidence: Stephen ..., 1 Nov 2013 [cached]
The latest evidence: Stephen Calvery, head of the Defense Force Protection Agency, gets an unfavorable write-up by the Defense Department's inspector general for giving employees administrative leave to participate in the agency's 2009 and 2010 golf tournaments.
Under the rules, such leave is allowable only if it benefits the agency's mission, furthers a particular DoD function or has "a government-wide recognized and sanctioned purpose," according to a redacted copy of the report posted today on the IG's website.
"DoD regulations do not list a golf tournament as a common situation in which agencies generally grant excused absence," the report says.
Calvery responded that the tournament was one of several team-building "esprit de corps" initiatives he had launched at the agency, which was created after 9/11 to protect the Pentagon and its workforce.
In his further defense, Calvery noted that only four employees received administrative leave to attend the 2009 tournament. After checking with lawyers, however, he required participating staff to take annual leave for the 2011 event. The IG was unmollified, citing the wrongful use of administrative leave as one of several allegations to have merit.
The IG also found that Calvery misused his position to have his office staff pick up his lunch and bring him coffee, arranged for someone (the name is blacked out, but it wasn't a DoD employee) to use the force protection agency's firing range and provided preferential hiring treatment to a subordinate.
Calvery still heads the agency, according to its website. What disciplinary action he faced, if any, is unclear. A DoD spokesman said today that he didn't know and that-if the punishment was administrative in nature-could not disclose it, anyway.
Tags: Defense Force Protection Agency, Stephen Calvery
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Archives for November 2013 | The Intelligence News | Defense News | Iran News | Syria News | ISIS/ISIL News, 1 Nov 2013 [cached]
Dated February 20, the report alleges that Stephen Calvery, director of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, granted a relative access to the agency's firing range, complete with instructors and [...] Read more
If you like playing golf on ..., 4 Nov 2013 [cached]
If you like playing golf on government time, Steven Calvery, the director of the Pentagon's police force, might be just the boss for you. Then again, if the idea of fetching lunch and coffee for your supervisor every day doesn't appeal, you might want to work elsewhere.
Calvery, the director of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, which safeguards the five-sided building and 100 other military sites around Washington, has been dinged by the Defense Department Inspector General for "misusing" his position and underlings.
In a 40-page report released Monday, the inspector general also said that Calvery improperly allowed an unnamed relative to blast away at the Pentagon Force Protection Agency firing range, while using a PFPA weapon and ammunition. Tips and advice were provided, gratis, by two PFPA firearms instructors. The relative was applying for a law-enforcement job with another agency and apparently needed some practice, the report found.
The inspector general began its misconduct investigation into Calvery after it received a couple of anonymous complaints in March 2011, as well as a letter from an unidentified U.S. senator. The inspector general labored on the inquiry for nearly two years, wrapping things up on Feb. 20, but then it kept the findings quiet.
On April 2, The Post filed a request for the Calvery investigation under the Freedom of Information Act. On Monday, seven months later, the inspector general finally coughed up the report.
Investigators found that Calvery wanted to boost the "esprit de corps" of the 1,300 folks who worked for him. So in 2009 and 2010, he decreed that anyone who wanted to play in the PFPA's annual golf tournament would get four hours paid administrative leave to hit the links.
Seems like demand was pretty high - the report notes that "the number of participants was regulated by the capacity of the golf course. An estimated 100-150 lucky duffers got to spend half the work day at play.
The next year, the fun came to an end when a party pooper in the PFPA's Office of General Counsel "advised that it was not a good idea to authorize administrative leave" to play golf. According to the report, Calvery later told investigators that he still thought he had the authority to let folks in the office play on taxpayers' time, but decided to "err on the side of caution" and make people take vacation time instead starting in 2011.
When they weren't on the golf course, however, life for the staffers in Calvery's office could sometimes be unpleasant. Five witnesses told the inspector general that Calvery's staffers brought him lunch and coffee every day, and that some of them weren't too happy about it.
One unidentified witness testified that Calvery would typically pre-order his lunch from the Air Force or Navy mess at the Pentagon and then his staffers would have to pick it up (no explanation for why Calvery avoided Army chow). The boss always paid for his meals and lattes, but the inspector general chided him for misusing his subordinates to cater to him.
Calvery told investigators that he never coerced anyone into fetching his lunch, adding: "I would hope if they felt uncomfortable doing it, they would tell me. And if they did feel uncomfortable, then that would be okay. You know, they wouldn't have to do that."
The inspector general urged the Office of the Secretary of Defense to take "appropriate action" against Calvery. Lt. Col. Tom Crosson, a Pentagon spokesman, said Calvery was subjected to "appropriate administrative action" as a result of the investigation, but declined to elaborate, citing privacy restrictions.
Calvery did not respond to a request for comment.
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