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Wrong Steve Maslow?

Steve Maslow

Director

Media&Marketing

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Media&Marketing

4245 Sarah Street

Burbank, California,91505

United States

Company Description

Communications and Marketing Strategies for the Professional Audio, Video, Broadcast and MultiMedia Industries...more

Background Information

Employment History

Mixer

Warner Bros.


Owner and President and Mixer

Twenty-First Century Mix


Web References(15 Total References)


Sound Design for "Twister"

mediaandmarketing.com [cached]

Lead mixer/dialog for the dub was Steve Maslow, with Gregg Landaker handling effects, and Kevin O' Connell supervising music tracks, as well as a small overflow of effects elements.
Maslow and Landaker have worked together at Universal for many years, on such landmark films as "Waterworld" (a 1995 Oscar Nominee), "Speed" (Oscar Nominee in 1994), and "JFK. According to Steve Maslow, director Jan De Bont wanted "Twister" to sound big! "They came to the pre-dub with hundreds and hundreds of raw elements- winds, debris, every imaginable kind of sound that Steve [Flick] could think to create. "We like the 'feel' of the sprockets," Maslow confides. "We didn't prepare extra tracks for the left-inner and right-inner channels on [the 8-channel] SDDS mix; we just bleed some information [from the left, center and right tracks] into the inner pair." Maslow recalls that the pre-dubbing process was particularly complex because of the large number of sound elements. "Steve Flick provided us with maybe 300-400 tracks for a tornado reel [on DA-88 and Pro Tools], and gives us his general idea of what he would like us to do with them. Then all three of us went to work with the material. Music was supplied on a 16-channel Pro Tools system, predubbed to 35 mm mag. "We didn't want to have everything playing at once, so we were diving in and out of different tracks", Maslow continues. During the final dubbing sequence, Maslow and his team had as many as 200 sound elements running through the main and sidecar consoles. In terms of using sound to create a mood to reinforce what's happening on the screen, Maslow says that he considered a variety of techniques. "There are a couple of scenes in the movie where a tornado is coming and we're just getting licks of wind wisps, and maybe a little growl here and there. All of sudden all the people are looking around the screen because they know something's coming, and then we hit them with it." In terms of discrete-versus-matrix mixes, Maslow offers that six separate tracks enable him to more accurately define the direction of each sound. "But Steve Flick is a genius for bringing to the stage pre-treated tracks with 90% of the effects done for us; he brings us what he feels will work," O' Connell says. "He may have a 'dry' [unprocessed] version and a 'wet' version so that we can mix between the two- when you're dealing with 400 tracks, for us to treat every single track would be very time consuming." "There's something a little different about 'Twister'," Maslow confides. "Because [composer] Mark Mancina and Steve [Flick] collaborated on editing the score with the sound effects, it all bends together seemlessly. In terms of dialog balance versus music and effects, Maslow says, "Basically, we just set the dialog at a comfortable level and worked everything else around it. Obviously, as the action ebbs and flows, some pieces of dialog are lost and we'll go up and re-tweak them." "Steve picked the level of dialog," Kevin O' Connell recalls, "and so Greg and I mixed the effects and all music around it, so that the overall sound level of the movie doesn't become offensive." According to Steve Maslow, "The effects elements came in on DA-88, which is a choice that Steve Flick made because it's very flexible. In terms of maintaining a consistency of sound throughout the movie, Maslow says that they spent a week doing a temp dub with the De Bont. "Jan and Steve [Flick] collaborated on those details before they would come to us. Re-Recording Engineers Steve Maslow, Gregg Landaker and Kevin O' Connell.


Sound Design for "Twister"

www.mediaandmarketing.com [cached]

Lead mixer/dialog for the dub was Steve Maslow, with Gregg Landaker handling effects, and Kevin O' Connell supervising music tracks, as well as a small overflow of effects elements.
Maslow and Landaker have worked together at Universal for many years, on such landmark films as "Waterworld" (a 1995 Oscar Nominee), "Speed" (Oscar Nominee in 1994), and "JFK. According to Steve Maslow, director Jan De Bont wanted "Twister" to sound big! "They came to the pre-dub with hundreds and hundreds of raw elements- winds, debris, every imaginable kind of sound that Steve [Flick] could think to create. "We like the 'feel' of the sprockets," Maslow confides. "We didn't prepare extra tracks for the left-inner and right-inner channels on [the 8-channel] SDDS mix; we just bleed some information [from the left, center and right tracks] into the inner pair." Maslow recalls that the pre-dubbing process was particularly complex because of the large number of sound elements. "Steve Flick provided us with maybe 300-400 tracks for a tornado reel [on DA-88 and Pro Tools], and gives us his general idea of what he would like us to do with them. Then all three of us went to work with the material. Music was supplied on a 16-channel Pro Tools system, predubbed to 35 mm mag. "We didn't want to have everything playing at once, so we were diving in and out of different tracks", Maslow continues. During the final dubbing sequence, Maslow and his team had as many as 200 sound elements running through the main and sidecar consoles. In terms of using sound to create a mood to reinforce what's happening on the screen, Maslow says that he considered a variety of techniques. "There are a couple of scenes in the movie where a tornado is coming and we're just getting licks of wind wisps, and maybe a little growl here and there. All of sudden all the people are looking around the screen because they know something's coming, and then we hit them with it." In terms of discrete-versus-matrix mixes, Maslow offers that six separate tracks enable him to more accurately define the direction of each sound. "But Steve Flick is a genius for bringing to the stage pre-treated tracks with 90% of the effects done for us; he brings us what he feels will work," O' Connell says. "He may have a 'dry' [unprocessed] version and a 'wet' version so that we can mix between the two- when you're dealing with 400 tracks, for us to treat every single track would be very time consuming." "There's something a little different about 'Twister'," Maslow confides. "Because [composer] Mark Mancina and Steve [Flick] collaborated on editing the score with the sound effects, it all bends together seemlessly. In terms of dialog balance versus music and effects, Maslow says, "Basically, we just set the dialog at a comfortable level and worked everything else around it. Obviously, as the action ebbs and flows, some pieces of dialog are lost and we'll go up and re-tweak them." "Steve picked the level of dialog," Kevin O' Connell recalls, "and so Greg and I mixed the effects and all music around it, so that the overall sound level of the movie doesn't become offensive." According to Steve Maslow, "The effects elements came in on DA-88, which is a choice that Steve Flick made because it's very flexible. In terms of maintaining a consistency of sound throughout the movie, Maslow says that they spent a week doing a temp dub with the De Bont. "Jan and Steve [Flick] collaborated on those details before they would come to us. Re-Recording Engineers Steve Maslow, Gregg Landaker and Kevin O' Connell.


Sound Design for "Twister"

www.mediaandmarketing.com [cached]

Lead mixer/dialog for the dub was Steve Maslow, with Gregg Landaker handling effects, and Kevin O' Connell supervising music tracks, as well as a small overflow of effects elements. Maslow and Landaker have worked together at Universal for many years, on such landmark films as "Waterworld" (a 1995 Oscar Nominee), "Speed" (Oscar Nominee in 1994), and "JFK."According to Steve Maslow, director Jan De Bont wanted "Twister" to sound big!"They came to the pre-dub with hundreds and hundreds of raw elements- winds, debris, every imaginable kind of sound that Steve [Flick] could think to create."We like the 'feel' of the sprockets," Maslow confides."We didn't prepare extra tracks for the left-inner and right-inner channels on [the 8-channel] SDDS mix; we just bleed some information [from the left, center and right tracks] into the inner pair."Maslow recalls that the pre-dubbing process was particularly complex because of the large number of sound elements."Steve Flick provided us with maybe 300-400 tracks for a tornado reel [on DA-88 and Pro Tools], and gives us his general idea of what he would like us to do with them.Then all three of us went to work with the material."Music was supplied on a 16-channel Pro Tools system, predubbed to 35 mm mag. "We didn't want to have everything playing at once, so we were diving in and out of different tracks", Maslow continues.During the final dubbing sequence, Maslow and his team had as many as 200 sound elements running through the main and sidecar consoles.In terms of using sound to create a mood to reinforce what's happening on the screen, Maslow says that he considered a variety of techniques."There are a couple of scenes in the movie where a tornado is coming and we're just getting licks of wind wisps, and maybe a little growl here and there.All of sudden all the people are looking around the screen because they know something's coming, and then we hit them with it." In terms of discrete-versus-matrix mixes, Maslow offers that six separate tracks enable him to more accurately define the direction of each sound."But Steve Flick is a genius for bringing to the stage pre-treated tracks with 90% of the effects done for us; he brings us what he feels will work," O' Connell says."He may have a 'dry' [unprocessed] version and a 'wet' version so that we can mix between the two- when you're dealing with 400 tracks, for us to treat every single track would be very time consuming." "There's something a little different about 'Twister'," Maslow confides."Because [composer] Mark Mancina and Steve [Flick] collaborated on editing the score with the sound effects, it all bends together seemlessly.In terms of dialog balance versus music and effects, Maslow says, "Basically, we just set the dialog at a comfortable level and worked everything else around it.Obviously, as the action ebbs and flows, some pieces of dialog are lost and we'll go up and re-tweak them." "Steve picked the level of dialog," Kevin O' Connell recalls, "and so Greg and I mixed the effects and all music around it, so that the overall sound level of the movie doesn't become offensive." According to Steve Maslow, "The effects elements came in on DA-88, which is a choice that Steve Flick made because it's very flexible.In terms of maintaining a consistency of sound throughout the movie, Maslow says that they spent a week doing a temp dub with the De Bont."Jan and Steve [Flick] collaborated on those details before they would come to us.


hold me / edwardSCISSORHANDS

scissorhands.evendim.org [cached]

Steve Maslow .... sound re-recording mixer


Sound Editorial for "U-571"

www.mediaandmarketing.com [cached]

and re-recording engineers Steve Maslow,
Johnson says that the re-recording mixers, Steve Maslow (dialog), Gregg Landaker (effects) and Kevin Kline (music), made full use of the extra creative opportunities offered by an SDDS 8 Channel soundtrack. "Normally we only have the center channel for important dialog and special effects," Maslow offers. "By keeping my effect tracks out of the center dialog channel, I can let Steve concentrate on the essentials of the plot and character development, while the effects draw the audience into the heart of the movie." Confirming Jon Johnson's recollections, Maslow says that in December 1999 the team prepared a six-channel Temp Dub for director Jonathan Mostow. "It became obvious," Steve Maslow remembers, "that Jonathan wanted a 'bigger sound' - the submarine interiors, explosions and the battle scenes needed more dynamic range. "My biggest challenge," offers Maslow, "was to keep the dialog intact, and the way in which it was presented to me. By which I mean that if the crew were talking quietly, I needed to be able to leave it alone, but if they were yelling at one another in the battle scenes then we could bring in the music and effects for emphasis.


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