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This profile was last updated on 12/8/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Stephen R. Devries MD

Wrong Dr. Stephen R. Devries MD?

Executive Director

Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology
Email: i***@***.org
The Gaples Institute
655 Deerfield Road Suite 100-328
Deerfield , Illinois 60015
United States

 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • MD
    Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute
  • MD , cardiology
142 Total References
Web References
Stephen Devries | Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology
www.gaplesinstitute.org, 23 May 2015 [cached]
Executive Director: Stephen Devries
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Stephen Devries
Dr. Stephen Devries is a preventive cardiologist with over 20 years of clinical experience in university based medical centers. He attended medical school and completed Internal Medicine training at the University of Michigan. Dr. Devries received Cardiovascular subspecialty training at Washington University in St. Louis and later completed a Fellowship in Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona with Dr. Andrew Weil.
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Dr. Devries previously wrote a weekly column, "Heart Beat", in the Chicago Sun-Times. He authored What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Cholesterol (2007, Warner Wellness). He later co-edited the textbook Integrative Cardiology (2010, Oxford University Press) with Dr. James Dalen. He has been voted by his peers many years over as one of the "Best Doctors in America" and lectures nationally on integrative approaches to prevention of heart disease.
CIMPH » Advisory Board
cimph.org, 1 June 2015 [cached]
Stephen Devries, MD
Associate Professor Division of Cardiology, Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University
Dr. Stephen Devries is a preventive cardiologist with a longstanding interest in integrative approaches. He attended medical school and completed his training in internal medicine at the University of Michigan. Dr. Devries went on to cardiovascular subspecialty training at Washington University and later completed a Fellowship in Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Lipidology. Dr. Devries was recruited to Northwestern University in 2007, where he is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology and has a busy preventive cardiology clinic emphasizing integrative approaches. Prior to coming to Northwestern, he served as director of the Integrative Program for Heart Disease Prevention at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Devries previously authored the weekly column "Heart Beat" in the Chicago Sun-Times and lectures nationally on integrative approaches to prevention of heart disease. Most recently, he authored a book published "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Cholesterol."
Dr. Steven DeVries, ...
www.chicagosfn.org [cached]
Dr. Steven DeVries, Northwestern University
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Dr. Steven DeVries, Departments of Ophthalmology and Physiology, Northwestern University
Before you get too worried about ...
eldoradospringsmo.com, 12 Mar 2015 [cached]
Before you get too worried about any of these common aging markers, its important to put these findings into perspective, says Stephen Devries, MD, cardiologist and associate professor at Northwesterns Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute and executive director of the Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology. He explains that while many similar studies have found a slight association between outward appearance and heart health, he believes that the connection isnt strong enough to be cause for concern for most people.
More often than not, heart disease is actually a silent problem, he says, but, there are some subtle signs that can indicate poor cardiovascular health.
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Devries adds that if you incorporate 30 minutes of light exercise most days of the week and avoid smoking, you can improve the benefits to an 80 percent reduction of heart problems.
"Now more than ever before, we ...
www.post-journal.com, 2 Mar 2009 [cached]
"Now more than ever before, we have the tools to stack the deck in favor of prevention," says Stephen Devries, M.D., preventative cardiologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute and the Center for Integrative Medicine and Wellness in Chicago. Devries uses a blend of natural therapies combined with conventional, high-tech therapies when treating patients at risk for heart disease. Some of the nonpharmaceutical approaches he finds most effective are dietary changes, the use of supplements, and treatment aimed at addressing the mind and body connection.
Diet for Risk Reduction A healthy diet is among the best ways to avoid cholesterol buildup, which can increase your risk of developing heart disease. Doctors recommend limiting nutrient-void foods like sweets and food high in fat and calories, and recommend more fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which contain sterols to help block the absorption of cholesterol. "Most people underestimate the potency of diet for prevention," says Devries, who favors a Mediterranean diet that has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease by up to 70 percent. Mediterranean diets include six daily servings of vegetables, two daily servings of fruit, two fish meals per week, exclusive use of olive and canola oils, limited intake of red meat and no processed carbohydrates such as cereal, soda or white flour. See Page 78 From Page 77 Supplements Over-the-counter supplements may be an alternative to prescription cholesterol-lowering medicines for those who are unwilling or unable to take prescriptions due to a history of side effects. Supplements commonly used by Devries include fish oil, red yeast rice extract and plant stanols/sterols. • Fish Oil--The active ingredients are omega-3 fatty acids, called DHA and EPA, which can lower fats called triglycerides and help convert "bad" cholesterol (LDL) to a healthier form.
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"These new blood tests allow us to go far beyond cholesterol to examine very serious inherited risks that were unknown a short time ago, but can now be treated," says Devries.
Mind/Body Connection Stress, anger and depression can have a strong impact on heart health that researchers are only just beginning to fully understand. To address the correlation between the mind and body, centers such as Northwestern Memorial's Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute and the Center for Integrative Medicine and Wellness have incorporated cardiac behavioral medicine into their practice. "The mind and heart are intricately connected. Stress-reducing techniques such as acupuncture, biofeedback and healing touch can lower stress, reduce blood pressure and keep your heart strong and healthy," says Devries. To learn more about heart disease or Dr. Devries, visit www.nmh.org or call (866) 662-8467. Subscribe to Post-Journal
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