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Wrong Stacy Allen?

Stacy D. Allen

Park Technician, Park Ranger

National Park Service

HQ Phone:  (501) 396-3000

Direct Phone: (731) ***-****direct phone

Email: s***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

National Park Service

1849 C Street N.W.

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20240

United States

Company Description

More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 413 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. The National Park Service has cared for the...more

Background Information

Employment History

Chief

Interpretation/Resource Mgmt


President

Civil War Preservation Trust


President

Association of National Park Rangers


President

Civil War Fortification Study Group


Affiliations

National Civil War Museum

Board Member


NPS

Historian


Strategic Planning

Board Member


Blue & Gray Magazine

Historian


Education

bachelor's degree

anthropology

University of Kansas


Web References(104 Total References)


Association of National Park Rangers - Officers

www.anpr.org [cached]

Stacy Allen
Stacy Allen Immediate Past President (nonvoting) Stacy Allen is the chief ranger at Shiloh National Military Park and manages an integrated park interpretation and resource management program. He has worked for the National Park Service since 1984, with work experience as a park technician, park ranger, lead park ranger, park historian and supervisory park ranger. A life member of the Association of National Park Rangers, he completed a three-year term Dec. 31, 2013, as president of the organization. More > > >


Association of National Park Rangers - Ranger Stacy Allen

www.anpr.org [cached]

Stacy Dale Allen is the chief ranger at Shiloh National Military Park and manages an integrated park interpretation and resource management program.
A life member of the Association of National Park Rangers, he is serving as president of the organization through Dec. 31, 2013. Previously he was the board member for strategic planning. A native Kansas "Jayhawker," Stacy is a graduate of the University of Kansas where he earned a bachelor's degree in anthropology. He began his public service career with the National Park Service as a park ranger duty at Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi. Duties included visitor and resource protection, interpretation and resource management. Five years later he accepted a transfer and promotion to lead park ranger at Shiloh where he supervised the park interpretation and visitor services program. Three years later he earned promotion to park historian, and held the position for 10 years. During this period he worked detail assignments at sister park units in the Southeast Region, providing interpretation and visitor/resource protection at various special events, including duty at Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park during the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Since June 2002 Stacy has occupied the managerial position of chief of interpretation and resource management. He oversees an integrated program of park operations, resource preservation and visitor services, which includes management of resources and compelling stories for five Civil War battlefields, two national historic landmarks, a segment of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail, and two interpretive centers. The parklands and resources are situated across four counties in southwest Tennessee and northeast Mississippi. Stacy has been involved in planning, compliance and construction of high-profile agency projects, such as the award-winning Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center, federal highway road and bridge construction on Shiloh battlefield, archaeological investigations of Shiloh Indian Mounds, and construction of the Indian Mounds interpretive shelter and trail. He also has worked with the Army Corps of Engineers in developing and constructing permanent erosion control along Shiloh's Tennessee River shoreline. As senior interpreter at Shiloh, Stacy coordinated the design and construction of state-of-the-art multimedia interpretive exhibits for the 15,000-square foot Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. It opened in 2004. He recently managed park commemorative activities associated with the Civil War Sesquicentennial. Shiloh established visitation records during presentation of commemoration program activities in 2012. He has represented the NPS on several televised historical documentaries. Since 2003 he has served as co-writer and historic adviser in the production of four NPS interpretive films, including the recently released Shiloh: Fiery Trial. It premiered in April 2012 in conjunction with the Civil War Sesquicentennial commemoration of the Battle of Shiloh, and later was broadcast on PBS affiliates nationwide. The new production replaced the park's 56-year-old live-action orientation film. Stacy currently is assisting producers in finalizing post-production on a new orientation film for the Civil War Interpretive Center in Corinth. He has authored or been a contributor to books, scholarly articles, agency guides, booklets, site bulletins and book reviews for scholarly journals and magazines. Stacy has served as historical adviser for the Mississippi Civil War Battlefield Commission; and regularly provides technical assistance to the American Battlefield Protection Program, the Tennessee Wars Commission, Tennessee Civil War Preservation Association and the Civil War Trust. He served as president of the Civil War Fortification Study Group for 12 years and currently serves on the advisory committee for the National Civil War Museum in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Stacy is married to Diane Woodford, a native of Savannah, Tennessee. Stacy enjoys good wine, cooking, photography and reading. He and Diane reside on Shiloh battlefield in government quarters. They love to travel and visit national parks. This spring they journey to Italy for the first time, and in early fall, Stacy most likely will visit the Lamar River Valley, spending long days watching wolves in Yellowstone's northern range. He has made this annual pilgrimage for the past 13 years.


www.civilwarnews.com

Edited by Stacy Dale AllenIllustrated, index, 400 pp., 2006.Farcountry Press, P.O. Box 5630, Helena, MT 59604, $14.96 (softbound), $20.22 (hardcover) plus shipping.Fortunately for us, Oake's descendants and National Park Service historian Stacy Allen finished the task for him. Stacy Allen has done an outstanding job of editing Oake's work.


National Public Lands Day - Helping Hands for America's Lands

www.npld.com [cached]

Stacy Allen, NPS1055 Pittsburg Landing RoadShiloh, TN 38376Ph: 731-689-5275stacy_allen@nps.gov


djournal.com -- News

www.djournal.com [cached]

CORINTH - Through extensive research of documents, photos and technology, National Park Service historian Stacy Allen and NPS archeologist John Cornelison have pinpointed the actual location of Battery Robinett, the scene of a two-day bloody battle between Union and Confederate soldiers in October 1862. Unfortunately, it is believed most of the 640-acre Freedmen's Camp was located to the west of North Parkway in an area now built over by roads and housing, Allen said. When the federal army left Corinth for Memphis in January 1864, they were never able to regenerate the camp, Allen said.The Corinth camp was a very successful operation, which included 300 acres in cotton and 100 acres in produce, he said. What happened? The buildings in the camp had been rapidly thrown together and may have been dismantled and taken with them when they left, Allen said, explaining why there might be no physical evidence of the freed slaves' houses. Some of the men from the camp had been trained by the Union soldiers and were made part of the battalion of U.S. Infantry which had been garrisoned in Memphis for some time, Allen said. Two regiments of the African-American infantry fought gallantly at Brice's Crossroads and were involved in hard, sustained action, he said."It was their first combat and they could hold their heads high from that action," Allen said Meeting goals


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