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Wrong Stacie Aarsvold?

Stacie Aarsvold

Fourth-Year Veterinary Student

University of California

HQ Phone:  (530) 754-8518

Email: s***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of California

One Shields Avenue

Davis, California,95616

United States

Company Description

The University of California opened its doors in 1869 with just 10 faculty members and 38 students. Today, the UC system includes more than 238,000 students and more than 190,000 faculty and staff, with more than 1.7 million alumni living and working around th...more

Web References(1 Total References)


www.thehorse.com

Stacie Aarsvold, BS, a fourth-year veterinary student at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, presented the results of the study at the 2011 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Nov. 18-22 in San Antonio, Texas.
"Navicular bone pathology (disease) is an important component of foot lameness in horses," Aarsvold said, adding that there are a number of common clinical radiographic findings related to the navicular bone including: "However, the pathogenesis and interrelationships of these changes remain poorly understood," Aarsvold noted. Aarsvold explained that she and her colleagues saw microstructural changes in the compact and trabecular areas of these severely diseased bones that were similar to what is seen in bone modeling (laying down of new bone) and pathology in other types of diseased bone. She noted that these changes are evidence that the biomechanical environment of the entire bone has been altered on all layers. "This study helps to clarify radiographic abnormalities identified in horses with navicular degeneration," she concluded. "We hope to apply this type of research to less severely affected bones in the future, which would allow us to get a better idea of the disease progression," Aarsvold explained.


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