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Wrong Slobodan Rajic?

Slobodan Rajic

Research and Development Staff, Nanosys, Sep, and Materials Res

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

HQ Phone:  (865) 576-2900

Direct Phone: (865) ***-****direct phone

Email: r***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Bethel Valley Road Building 2040

Oak Ridge, Tennessee,37831

United States

Company Description

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multi-program science and technology laboratory managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by UT-Battelle, LLC. Scientists and engineers at ORNL conduct basic and applied research and development to create scientific kn...more

Background Information

Employment History

Research and Development Staff, Nanosys, Sep, and Materials Res

ORNL Review Magazine


Web References(13 Total References)


cyborg.posterous.com

The system, developed by a team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Slobodan Rajic, precisely measures the deflection of the barrel relative to the sight and then electronically makes the necessary corrections.
The lifesaving results are lethal. "For military snipers, missing the target could allow high-profile terrorists to escape," Rajic said. "For police marksmen, missing the kidnapper could endanger the lives of hostages and then pose subsequent danger to police officers and the public." The Reticle Compensating Rifle Barrel Reference Sensor takes the guesswork out of shooting by shifting the burden of knowing the relative position between the barrel and the weapon sight axes from the shooter to an electronic sensor. The system precisely measures the deflection of the barrel relative to the sight and then electronically realigns the moving reticle, or crosshairs, with the true position of the barrel, or bore axis. "When a weapon is sighted in, the aim point and bullet point of impact coincide," Rajic said. "However, in the field, anything that comes into contact with the barrel can cause perturbation of the barrel and induce errors." With modern high-caliber rifles boasting ranges of up to two miles, even very small barrel disruptions can cause a shooter to miss by a wide margin. That makes this technology indispensable from a marksman's perspective, Rajic said. "The optical fibers are designed to split the laser beam twice, sending one beam along the top of the rifle barrel and another light beam along the side of the barrel," Rajic said. "Thus, we can measure both the vertical and horizontal barrel deflection." Through a combination of algorithms, optics and additional sensor inputs, the system can take into account distance and other factors affecting the bullet trajectory. Ultimately the shooter is left with crosshairs that automatically adjust for conditions in real time. In the end, the resolution of ORNL's Reticle Compensating Rifle Barrel Reference Sensor is 250 times better than that of traditional reticles, which can normally be manually adjusted by one-fourth minutes of angle whereas the ORNL sensor can sense angular displacement and shift the reticle by 1/1,000th of a minute of angle, Rajic said. Rajic and colleagues are also developing a laser-based bullet tracking system to give the shooter even better odds of succeeding by providing specific information about the bullet flight path.


www.technudge.net

The system, developed by a team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Slobodan Rajic, precisely measures the deflection of the barrel relative to the sight and then electronically makes the necessary corrections.
The lifesaving results are lethal. "For military snipers, missing the target could allow high-profile terrorists to escape," Rajic said.


www.sniperinfo.com

A laboratory prototype of the Reticle Compensating Rifle Barrel Reference Sensor allows Slobodan Rajic to fine-tune the technology.
"For military snipers, missing the target could allow high-profile terrorists to escape," said Slobodan Rajic, a researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. "For police marksmen, missing the kidnapper could endanger the lives of hostages and then pose subsequent danger to police officers and the public." Such tiny sighting changes can make all the difference when shooting over long distances. Modern rifles can effectively hit targets up to two miles away, which means that even the smallest disruptions between sight and barrel alignment can throw off shots by wide margins. Rajic used optical fibers to split a laser beam and direct the split beam along both the top and side of the rifle barrel. That gives both vertical and horizontal measurements of the barrel's deflection compared to the sight, and allows the system to make the appropriate corrections. But Rajic and his Oak Ridge National Laboratory colleagues won't stop there. I wander if Slobodan has ever been to a sniper school.


www.technudge.net [cached]

The system, developed by a team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Slobodan Rajic, precisely measures the deflection of the barrel relative to the sight and [...]


www.newswise.com

Rifle optical sighting systems with a 19th century heritage could blast into modern times with a laser-based bullet tracking system being developed by a team led by Slobodan Rajic of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.


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