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This profile was last updated on 6/5/14  and contains information from public web pages.

Mr. Silas Mercer

Wrong Silas Mercer?

Worthy Minister

Local Address: Georgia, United States
 
8 Total References
Web References
Southern Baptist Historical Library & Archives - Jesse Mercer
www.sbhla.org, 5 June 2014 [cached]
Son of Silas Mercer, able pioneer minister and the eldest of eight children, five boys and three girls.
...
Although reared an Episcopalian, Silas Mercer became a Baptist from conviction.
A GENERAL HISTORY OF THE BAPTIST DENOMINATION IN AMERICA
www.hiddenhillssgbaptistchurch.org, 24 May 2013 [cached]
SILAS MERCER (1745-1796)
Silas Mercer was born near Currituck Bay, North-Carolina, February, 1745. His mother died while he was an infant; his father was a zealous member of the Church of England, and carefully instructed him in the catechism, rites, and traditions of that communion. From early years, young Silas was religiously inclined; but it was not till after he arrived at manhood, that he was brought to the knowledge of salvation through a divine Redeemer. He was for a long time embarrassed and bewildered with that legal system, which he had been taught in his mother Church, and so deeply rooted were the prejudices of his education, that it took him long to learn that salvation is not of works. But he at length gained clear and consistent views of the gospel plan, and was, through his long ministry, a distinguished and powerful defender of the doctrine of free, unmerited grace.
Until after his conversion, Mr. Mercer was most violently opposed to Dissenters in general, and to the Baptists in particular. He would on no account hear one preach, and endeavored to dissuade all others from attending their meetings. He most firmly believed what his father and parson had taught him, that they were all a set of deceivers, that their heresies were dangerous if not damnable, and that to hear one preach would be a crime of peculiar enormity. He knew, however, but little about them, only that they had separated from the Church, and ought therefore to be opposed and avoided. For these reasons he continued a violent opposer to them, and zealously to defend the Church; But his ingenuous mind could not long be restrained by the shackles of tradition, without examining things for himself; he therefore began a course of inquiries, which gradually, undermined his traditionary creed, and led on to the Baptist ground. He first resolved to follow strictly the Rubric of the Church, both in doctrine and discipline; and finding it enjoined immersion, unless the weakness of the child required a milder mode, he had two of his children dipped. The first a son, in a barrel of water at the priest?s house; and the other a daughter, in a tub, which had been prepared for the purpose at the Church. The son was named Jesse, who is now a worthy minister in Georgia; he was baptized again, on a profession of his faith, and is of course an ana-Baptist. Mr. Mercer was also struck with the neglect of discipline in the Church; he saw with pain that persons grossly immoral in many respects were admitted to their communion, and became convinced that things ought not so to be. Hervey?s Theron and Aspasio started him from the Arminian system, and set him on a train of reflections, which issued in a thorough conviction of the doctrine of the gospel. He labored for a time to reform the church; but finding the building was too far gone to be repaired, he receded from it with reluctant steps, and became a Baptist when he was about thirty years of age, and continued from that time to the end of his life an ornament to their cause, and a skilful defender of their distinguishing tenets.
Few men, perhaps, have had more severe conflicts in renouncing the prejudices of education, than Mr. Mercer. This kind but bigoted father threw in his way obstacles, which he could not at first surmount; the church priest, and the whole Episcopal fraternity around him, used the most assiduous endeavors to prevent him from going amongst the heretical Baptists. The first minister of the denomination he ever heard preach, was a Mr. Thomas, at that time a successful preacher in North-Carolina. It was with much reluctance, and with many fearful apprehensions of the dangerous consequences, that he was induced to attend the meeting. But in spite of all his prejudices, the preacher drew his attention, and led him to think he was not such a dangerous deceiver as he had always before supposed. This was on Monday. The next Lord?s day, the priest being absent, and his father being clerk, performed as usual the duties of his office. As yet none of the family knew that Silas had been to the Baptist meeting. After the service of the day was over, a person asked him, in the hearing of his father, how he liked the Baptist preacher? He was much confused, and knew not what to answer; but his conscience obliged him to express some degree of approbation. At which the old gentleman burst into tears, and exclaimed, "Silas, you are ruined! and out he went, hastily home. Silas, alarmed, took hastily after him, to soothe his grief and appease his resentment.
...
"Mr. Mercer, both in countenance and manners, had considerably the appearance of sternness; and to feel quite free in his company, it was necessary to be well acquainted with him.
Son of Silas Mercer, able ...
www.likefaithandorder.org, 16 Sept 2012 [cached]
Son of Silas Mercer, able pioneer minister and the eldest of eight children, five boys and three girls.
A General History of the Baptist Denomination, David Benedict | The Reformed Reader
www.reformedreader.org, 22 Mar 2007 [cached]
SILAS MERCER (1745-1796)
Silas Mercer was born near Currituck Bay, North-Carolina, February, 1745. His mother died while he was an infant; his father was a zealous member of the Church of England, and carefully instructed him in the catechism, rites, and traditions of that communion. From early years, young Silas was religiously inclined; but it was not till after he arrived at manhood, that he was brought to the knowledge of salvation through a divine Redeemer. He was for a long time embarrassed and bewildered with that legal system, which he had been taught in his mother Church, and so deeply rooted were the prejudices of his education, that it took him long to learn that salvation is not of works. But he at length gained clear and consistent views of the gospel plan, and was, through his long ministry, a distinguished and powerful defender of the doctrine of free, unmerited grace.
Until after his conversion, Mr. Mercer was most violently opposed to Dissenters in general, and to the Baptists in particular. He would on no account hear one preach, and endeavored to dissuade all others from attending their meetings. He most firmly believed what his father and parson had taught him, that they were all a set of deceivers, that their heresies were dangerous if not damnable, and that to hear one preach would be a crime of peculiar enormity. He knew, however, but little about them, only that they had separated from the Church, and ought therefore to be opposed and avoided. For these reasons he continued a violent opposer to them, and zealously to defend the Church; But his ingenuous mind could not long be restrained by the shackles of tradition, without examining things for himself; he therefore began a course of inquiries, which gradually, undermined his traditionary creed, and led on to the Baptist ground. He first resolved to follow strictly the Rubric of the Church, both in doctrine and discipline; and finding it enjoined immersion, unless the weakness of the child required a milder mode, he had two of his children dipped.
...
Mr. Mercer was also struck with the neglect of discipline in the Church; he saw with pain that persons grossly immoral in many respects were admitted to their communion, and became convinced that things ought not so to be. Hervey?s Theron and Aspasio started him from the Arminian system, and set him on a train of reflections, which issued in a thorough conviction of the doctrine of the gospel. He labored for a time to reform the church; but finding the building was too far gone to be repaired, he receded from it with reluctant steps, and became a Baptist when he was about thirty years of age, and continued from that time to the end of his life an ornament to their cause, and a skilful defender of their distinguishing tenets.
Few men, perhaps, have had more severe conflicts in renouncing the prejudices of education, than Mr. Mercer. This kind but bigoted father threw in his way obstacles, which he could not at first surmount; the church priest, and the whole Episcopal fraternity around him, used the most assiduous endeavors to prevent him from going amongst the heretical Baptists. The first minister of the denomination he ever heard preach, was a Mr. Thomas, at that time a successful preacher in North-Carolina. It was with much reluctance, and with many fearful apprehensions of the dangerous consequences, that he was induced to attend the meeting. But in spite of all his prejudices, the preacher drew his attention, and led him to think he was not such a dangerous deceiver as he had always before supposed. This was on Monday. The next Lord?s day, the priest being absent, and his father being clerk, performed as usual the duties of his office. As yet none of the family knew that Silas had been to the Baptist meeting. After the service of the day was over, a person asked him, in the hearing of his father, how he liked the Baptist preacher? He was much confused, and knew not what to answer; but his conscience obliged him to express some degree of approbation. At which the old gentleman burst into tears, and exclaimed, "Silas, you are ruined! and out he went, hastily home. Silas, alarmed, took hastily after him, to soothe his grief and appease his resentment.
...
"Mr. Mercer, both in countenance and manners, had considerably the appearance of sternness; and to feel quite free in his company, it was necessary to be well acquainted with him.
SILAS MERCER, a well-known ...
www.washingtonga.net, 1 May 2007 [cached]
SILAS MERCER, a well-known Baptist preacher, secured the services of JAMES ARMOR as teacher in 1793 and opened a school at Salem, his residence nine miles south of Washington.
...
The founder of this latter church was SILAS MERCER, who during the previous year had been most influential in organizing the Georgia Baptist Association, the first of the religious groups that later formed the Georgia Baptist Convention.After serving as pastor for a few years, MERCER was succeeded by his son JESSE, who preached there for thirty-seven years.
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