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This profile was last updated on 7/1/04  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Shimon Margolin

Wrong Shimon Margolin?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Executive Director
    The Jewish Heritage Center for Emigres
  • Chief Executive Officer
    Russian Jewish Community of SF
  • Rabbi

Board Memberships and Affiliations

17 Total References
Web References
Richmond Review - July 2004
www.sunsetbeacon.com, 1 July 2004 [cached]
"Religion is the opium for the masses," says Rabbi Shimon Margolin, quoting Karl Marx.
...
Margolin is the executive director of the Jewish Heritage Center for Emigres, which serves the Russian Jewish community.The rabbi is all too familiar with the stereotypes many Russians hold toward religion Ð which is why he decided not to call the center a synagogue.
"We wanted to be a place where the Russian (Jewish) community could reconnect with their heritage," Margolin said, in his Russian accent.
...
"Kabbalah is an esoteric interpretation of the Hebrew Bible," Margolin explained.Because kabbalah has made its way to Hollywood, with devotees like Madonna, the rabbi pointed out that he teaches authentic kabbalah and not "pop" kabbalah.
The center also caters to children's educational needs, offering classes in Jewish tradition, Hebrew and bar mitzvah and bat mitzvah preparations.A day camp, for which there is a modest fee, is run every spring, summer and winter break. (Spaces for the August session are still available.)
Margolin has recently taken a group of young adults, ages 18 to 26, on a free trip to Israel.He plans to start a Jewish teen club for educational and social purposes.
...
"Our budget cannot allow us to have any paid staff," Margolin said.
Despite his secular upbringing in Ukraine, Margolin said he was made to feel different because he was Jewish, both by the government and by his family.
One day as a child, he joined his class in skipping school.But when he got home his parents told him he could not do that because he was Jewish.
"What's so different about being Jewish?"he wondered.
With the fall of the Soviet empire approaching, Margolin went to Moscow to study Judaism.After a year, in 1990, he decided to become a rabbi.
He left his family, which was also becoming more religious, for New Jersey and then Los Angeles, where he continued his rabbinical education and eventually met his wife.The couple moved to San Francisco's Richmond District eight years ago and now have three children.
Margolin has been serving the Jewish community in the City for the past six years and has been looking for a location for his center for the past two.The center opened in April and is already outgrowing itself.
"We need more room for our programs," he said.
"We're calling it a community or ...
www.sfrussianjews.org [cached]
"We're calling it a community or congregation; it's an easier term for them," said Rabbi Shimon Margolin, its founder, with the "them" meaning Russian Jewish emigres.
...
"Religion is the opium for the masses," says Rabbi Shimon Margolin, quoting Karl Marx.
...
Margolin is the executive director of the Jewish Heritage Center for Emigres, which serves the Russian Jewish community.
...
"Some emigre mothers came to me and said their kids have nothing to do in the summer," said Rabbi Shimon Margolin of San Francisco, who is running it.
...
Sunday, May 6 will be a monumental day for Rabbi Shimon Margolin. Not only will he unveil a Shoah monument he has worked to erect since 1998, he feels he'll be wiping his own slate clean. Nearly four years ago, Margolin and San Francisco allergist Dr. Vadim Kvitash were sued by a group calling itself the Odessa Compatriot Association, which accused the rabbi and doctor of diverting the funds intended for the memorial.
Rabbi Shimon Margolin was ...
www.sfrussianjews.org [cached]
Rabbi Shimon Margolin was born in Ukraine - one of the republics of the former Soviet Union. His family, like any typical Soviet Jewish family did not practice Judaism until the fall of Communism. At the age of 17, he started to attend synagogue and Judaic classes in his native city of Dnepropetrovsk and a year later enrolled himself in the Jewish Theological seminary in Moscow. His Rabbinical education continued in Israel and the United States, where he immigrated in 1994.
Rabbi Margolin serves Russian-speaking Jewish community of San Francisco and the Bay Area since 1998. He began his service of Russian-speaking Jewry by founding the Techiah Foundation - an educational and outreach organization, charged with the mission to build Russian-speaking Jewish community & help the immigrants to reclaim their cultural heritage. The foundation conducted a wide variety of classes, workshops, lectures and community wide events. Rabbi Margolin produced weekly Radio & TV programs and published monthly Jewish newspaper in Russian under the auspices of Techiah Foundation.
In 2003, Rabbi Margolin co-founded Russian-speaking Jewish Community of S. Francisco. In the course of his rabbinical career, Rabbi Margolin taught in Jewish Day Schools in New York and Los Angeles and served as a Judaic principal of "Mesivta" Jewish Day School in Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine). He worked as the counselor in overnight camp for Russian Jewish children in Israel, educational director of the Jewish overnight camp in Charkov (Ukraine) and a co-director of Jewish overnight camp in Riga (Latvia).
Rabbi Margolin has founded & directed the Menorah Jewish Day camp in San Francisco and taught in San Francisco's Bais Menachem Yeshivah Day School for the last 4 years.
Rabbi Margolin has been an advisor /educator for numerous Jewish clubs in San Francisco's public schools and an advisor of San Francisco's chapter of the Bnei Brith Youth Organization. He has lead 5 group trips to Israel for 200 young adults and prepared over 60 children from Russian-Jewish families for their Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebration.
Overall Rabbi Margolin has 20 years of experience as a Jewish educator in various formal and informal settings that include day schools, teen clubs, day camps and overnight camps. Rabbi Margolin is fluent in Russian, English and Hebrew.
RABOTA / About RABOTA / Board of Directors
www.rabotaus.com, 14 Jan 2006 [cached]
Rabbi Shimon Margolin, Head of Advisory Committee.
"Religion is the opium for the ...
www.sfrichmondreview.com, 1 July 2004 [cached]
"Religion is the opium for the masses," says Rabbi Shimon Margolin, quoting Karl Marx.
...
Margolin is the executive director of the Jewish Heritage Center for Emigres, which serves the Russian Jewish community.The rabbi is all too familiar with the stereotypes many Russians hold toward religion - which is why he decided not to call the center a synagogue.
"We wanted to be a place where the Russian (Jewish) community could reconnect with their heritage," Margolin said, in his Russian accent.
...
"Kabbalah is an esoteric interpretation of the Hebrew Bible," Margolin explained.Because kabbalah has made its way to Hollywood, with devotees like Madonna, the rabbi pointed out that he teaches authentic kabbalah and not "pop" kabbalah.
The center also caters to children's educational needs, offering classes in Jewish tradition, Hebrew and bar mitzvah and bat mitzvah preparations.A day camp, for which there is a modest fee, is run every spring, summer and winter break. (Spaces for the August session are still available.)
Margolin has recently taken a group of young adults, ages 18 to 26, on a free trip to Israel.He plans to start a Jewish teen club for educational and social purposes.
...
"Our budget cannot allow us to have any paid staff," Margolin said.
Despite his secular upbringing in Ukraine, Margolin said he was made to feel different because he was Jewish, both by the government and by his family.
One day as a child, he joined his class in skipping school.But when he got home his parents told him he could not do that because he was Jewish.
"What's so different about being Jewish?"he wondered.
With the fall of the Soviet empire approaching, Margolin went to Moscow to study Judaism.After a year, in 1990, he decided to become a rabbi.
He left his family, which was also becoming more religious, for New Jersey and then Los Angeles, where he continued his rabbinical education and eventually met his wife.The couple moved to San Francisco's Richmond District eight years ago and now have three children.
Margolin has been serving the Jewish community in the City for the past six years and has been looking for a location for his center for the past two.The center opened in April and is already outgrowing itself.
"We need more room for our programs," he said.
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