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This profile was last updated on 7/26/2013 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Wrong Shawn Aarde?

Shawn M. Aarde

Research Associate

The Scripps Research Institute

HQ Phone:  (858) 784-1000

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

The Scripps Research Institute

10550 N. Torrey Pines Road TPC-5

La Jolla, California,92037

United States

Company Description

The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in...more

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Web References(4 Total References)


Study: Bath salts more addictive than meth

www.interventionservicesinc.com [cached]

"One stereotyped behavior that we often observed was a rat repeatedly licking the clear plastic walls of its operant chamber - a behavior that was sometimes uninterruptable," said TSRI Research Associate Shawn Aarde in a press release.


Bath Salts Stimulant Could Be More Addictive Than Meth | NewRelevant

newrelevant.com [cached]

"When we increased how many lever presses a rat would have to emit to get an additional infusion of drug, we observed that rats emitted about 60 presses on average for a dose of METH but up to about 600 for MDPV - some rats would even emit 3,000 lever presses for a single hit of MDPV," said TSRI Research Associate Shawn M. Aarde, who was first author of the study.
"If you consider these lever presses a measure of how much a rat will work to get a drug infusion, then these rats worked more than 10 times harder to get MDPV." MDPV increased the average activity level of the animals. But at higher - albeit still modest - doses, it produced repetitive behaviors similar to the tooth-grinding and compulsive skin-picking seen in human meth and MDPV users. "One stereotyped behavior that we often observed was a rat repeatedly licking the clear plastic walls of its operant chamber - a behavior that was sometimes uninterruptable," said Aarde. "One could say MDPV turned some rats into 'window lickers' of a sort." Chemical Variations Reports on human MDPV users suggest that the drug's behavioral effects can persist for lengthy periods after drug use stops, and Taffe and Aarde are now setting up studies of MDPV's long-term behavioral effects.


Research team shows 'bath salts' stimulant could be more addictive than meth (7/26/2013)

www.brainmysteries.com [cached]

"When we increased how many lever presses a rat would have to emit to get an additional infusion of drug, we observed that rats emitted about 60 presses on average for a dose of METH but up to about 600 for MDPV-some rats would even emit 3,000 lever presses for a single hit of MDPV," said TSRI Research Associate Shawn M. Aarde, who was first author of the study.
"If you consider these lever presses a measure of how much a rat will work to get a drug infusion, then these rats worked more than 10 times harder to get MDPV." MDPV increased the average activity level of the animals. But at higher-albeit still modest-doses, it produced repetitive behaviors similar to the tooth-grinding and compulsive skin-picking seen in human meth and MDPV users. "One stereotyped behavior that we often observed was a rat repeatedly licking the clear plastic walls of its operant chamber-a behavior that was sometimes uninterruptable," said Aarde. "One could say MDPV turned some rats into 'window lickers' of a sort." Chemical Variations Reports on human MDPV users suggest that the drug's behavioral effects can persist for lengthy periods after drug use stops, and Taffe and Aarde are now setting up studies of MDPV's long-term behavioral effects.


www.interventionservicesinc.com

"One stereotyped behavior that we often observed was a rat repeatedly licking the clear plastic walls of its operant chamber - a behavior that was sometimes uninterruptable," said TSRI Research Associate Shawn Aarde in a press release.


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