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Wrong Sergio Canavero?

Sergio Canavero

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Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Web References(158 Total References)


Print Page - First-ever human head transplant is now possible, says neuroscientist

www.bachelors-grove.com [cached]

Technical barriers to grafting one persons head onto another persons body can now be overcome, says Dr. Sergio Canavero, a member of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group.
In a recent paper (http://www.surgicalneurologyint.com/article.asp?issn=2152-7806;year=2013;volume=4;issue=2;spage=335;epage=342;aulast=Canavero;type=0), Canavero outlines a procedure modeled on successful head transplants which have been carried out in animals since 1970 (http://io9.com/5856747/a-short-film-about-the-monkey-head-transplant-experiment-of-the-1960s). The one problem with these transplants was that scientists were unable to connect the animals spinal cords to their donor bodies, leaving them paralyzed below the point of transplant. But, says Canavero, recent advances in re-connecting spinal cords that are surgically severed mean that it should be technically feasible to do it in humans. (This is not the same as restoring nervous system function to quadriplegics or other victims of traumatic spinal cord injury.) Read more (http://qz.com/99413/first-ever-human-head-transplant-is-now-possible-says-neuroscientist/)


First-ever human head transplant is now possible, says neuroscientist

www.bachelors-grove.com [cached]

Technical barriers to grafting one persons head onto another persons body can now be overcome, says Dr. Sergio Canavero, a member of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group.
In a recent paper, Canavero outlines a procedure modeled on successful head transplants which have been carried out in animals since 1970. The one problem with these transplants was that scientists were unable to connect the animals spinal cords to their donor bodies, leaving them paralyzed below the point of transplant. But, says Canavero, recent advances in re-connecting spinal cords that are surgically severed mean that it should be technically feasible to do it in humans. (This is not the same as restoring nervous system function to quadriplegics or other victims of traumatic spinal cord injury.) Read more


Science News: Latest Science Articles, Science Current Events

weeklydailynews.com [cached]

An Italian neurosurgeon named Sergio Canavero, head of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, believes that he can successfully perform the first human head transplant as early as 2016.
He unveiled his plans in Annapolis, Maryland, during a 2.5 hour presentation at a conference of the American Academy of Neurological and Orthopedic Surgeons. During the presentation, Canavero introduced the man who has volunteered to be the first human to undergo a head transplant. This man, Russian-born ValerySpiridonov, is 30 years old.Spiridonov suffers from an incurable, progressive wasting ailment known asWerdnig-Hoffmann disease. If successful, a head transplant surgery could prolong his lie. Canavero spoke during his presentation about how he would mend the severed spinal cord, which would be crucial for any such surgery, and explained major advances in the field, particularly with regards to animals. The trick, he says, is to cut the cord with a nano blade, then use polyethylene glycol and an electrical current in a rather Frankenstein-esque manner to speed and promote the reattachment of nerve fibers cut during the surgery. Read More »


Site For Sore Eyes :: View topic - Head Transplant

www.millerarts.com [cached]

Dr Sergio Canavero believes that the technology now exists that will allow surgeons to carry out the Frankenstein-style procedure, which has been tested out on animals since 1970.
In 1970 Robert White successfully transplanted the head of a rhesus monkey onto the body of a second rhesus, and Dr Canavero, a member of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, has proposed using a similar method.


resurrection Archives » SkyWatchTV

skywatchtv.com [cached]

Professor Sergio Canavero, Director of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, is aiming to carry out the first human head transplant within 10 months and then wants to begin trials on brain transplants.
If the procedures are successful, he believes that frozen brains could be thawed and inserted into a donor body.


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