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This profile was last updated on 9/26/10  and contains information from public web pages.

Sean R. Harvell

Wrong Sean R. Harvell?

Combat Controller

22nd Special Tactics Squadron
 
Background

Employment History

  • Commander
    22nd Special Tactics Squadron
  • Combat Controller
    The Air Force
  • Controller
    Combat Control School
6 Total References
Web References
Sean Harvell
www.sgtmacsbar.com, 26 Sept 2010 [cached]
In another, when Taliban forces attacked his team as they responded to a US helicopter crash, Harvell was wounded and knocked unconscious, but he recovered, returning fire and directing danger-close CAS.
Staff Sergeant Sean R. Harvell distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United States near Garm Ab Village and Kajaki Sofia, Afghanistan on 8 May 2007 and 30 May 2007. During this period, while performing the duties as a Combat Controller, 22d Expeditionary Special Tactics Squadron, 1st Expeditionary Special Operations Group, Combined Joint Special Operations Air Component, Special Operations Command Central in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Sergeant Harvell selflessly and conspicuously risked his life during two engagements while under heavy enemy fire to establish contact with fighter aircraft and direct the surgical employment of lethal air power against an overwhelming enemy; In the first engagement, Sergeant Harvell and his team Brisked destruction from a relentless enemy attack and subsequent ambush while on reconnaissance patrol. Sergeant Harvell, cognizant of his team's precarious situation and increasing casualties in the face of debilitating enemy attacks, deliberately exposed his position to orchestrate close air support, enable an HH-60 medical evacuation and cover the exfdtratioh of his nine-vehicle convoy and team over a ten-hour period. Completely enveloped by enemy fire and at great personal risk, he calmly directed air attacks, destroying multiple Taliban positions arid saving the lives of his teammates. Later, in the middle of a devastating ambush, he again exposed himself to heavy enemy fire from as close as five meters and directed F-18 strafing runs within a mere 45 feet of his position to rout enemy insurgents. On 30 May 2007, while attempting the recovery of a downed CH-47 helicopter and United States Army aircrew, he was wounded and knocked unconscious by a rocket propelled grenade fired by Taliban militants in a daring daylight ambush. Regaining consciousness and bleeding from multiple wounds, Sergeant Harvell engaged Taliban fighters with his personal M-4 carbine, M-12 shotgun and then grenades while simultaneously directing deadly, danger-close air attacks onto the enemy, allowing his convoy to break contact. Disregarding medical assistance, Sergeant Harvell continued to direct AC-130 and AH-64 helicopter attacks On the insurgent force, effectively neutralizing all enemy threats to his team and allowing another special operations team to recover the remains of all service members and sensitive equipment from the crash site. During these two days of fierce fighting, his expertise in the employment of air power and selfless service resulted in the death of 212 enemy combatants and release of 18,000 pounds of aviation ordinance. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Sergeant Harvell has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Staff Sergeant Sean R. Harvell distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United States near Kherwaray Village, Afghanistan on 25 July 2007. On this date, while performing duties as a Combat Controller, 22d Expeditionary Special Tactics Squadron, 1st Expeditionary Special Operations Group, Combined Joint Special Operations Air Component, Special Operations Command Central in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, Sergeant Harvell and his Army Special Forces team became engaged in a savage eight-hour firefight with Taliban forces to negate an enemy ambush by clearing a compound along the Helmand River. Leading a small joint team into a compound with a fortified enemy position, Sergeant Harvell repeatedly placed himself in harm's way with little regard for his own safety. On the initial breach, he and his Marine Corps teammate engaged and killed an insurgent who was laying-in-wait from a covered position. Sergeant Harvell and his teammate then moved to another covered position to engage additional enemy combatants^ whereupon Sergeant Harvell again risked his life sprinting through a fatal funnel of fire to gain a dominant attack position, keeping the enemy pinned inside a room and within the compound's perimeter. Twice, while taking hellish, direct machine-gun fire from just thirty feet away, he exposed himself and shot a rocket propelled grenade to clear the enemy occupied room, but without immediate result. Sergeant Harvell then maneuvered inside the compound with three teammates; positioning himself below the window the Taliban were firing from. Crouching under the window, he pulled the pin on a grenade and delayed two seconds before throwing it through the opening, killing another insurgent and abating enemy fire. Finally, as Taliban reinforcements arrived, Sergeant Harvell and his team withdrew from the compound; Providing covering fire for his teammates as they exited, Sergeant Harvell was the last to leave. As he sprinted across the open yard, rounds from enemy heavy machine gun fire peppered around his feet. While moving across a 200-yard open wadi, Sergeant Harvell and his teammates selflessly stopped to return fire, thereby covering the movement of the rest of the team to safety. In position on the other side of the wadi, Sergeant Harvell directed A-10 fighter and AC-130 gunship engagement of the enemy with immediate success, neutralizing their attacks and killing over fifty ihsurgents. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Sergeant Harvell has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Combat Controller Receives Two Silver Stars: The Air Force has awarded two Silver Stars, the third highest award for valor, to SSgt. Sean Harvell, a Combat Controller with the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron at JB Lewis-McChord, Wash., for his actions during multiple firefights in Afghanistan in 2007. At a joint ceremony April 29 honoring several Combat Controllers (see additional entries below), Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz presented Harvell his medals.
...
During one engagement, Harvell deliberately exposed his position so he could coordinate close air support during an intense 23-hour firefight. In another, when Taliban forces attacked his team as they responded to a US helicopter crash, Harvell was wounded and knocked unconscious, but he recovered, returning fire and directing danger-close CAS. And in a third, following a rolling, three-day engagement, Harvell repeatedly exposed his position during an eight-hour firefight, provided covering fire as his team withdrew, and then coordinated CAS for their replacements.
The Air Force has awarded two Silver Stars, the third highest award for valor, to SSgt. Sean Harvell, a Combat Controller with the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron at JB Lewis-McChord, Wash., for his actions during multiple firefights in Afghanistan in 2007. At a joint ceremony April 29, 2010, honoring several Combat Controllers, Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz presented Harvell his medals.
...
Pictured; Sean Harvell ; sent by Gene Johnson, McChord CCT Photographer
...
Sean Harvell dodged the gunfire again, covering his team as he went.
Then he called in airstrikes that reportedly killed more than 50 insurgents in Central Afghanistan's Helmand River area.
Those were the local airman's heroics on just one day, "during a savage eight-hour firefight," according to his Air Force citation.
It earned Harvell a Silver Star award. He earned another two months earlier.
A rocket-propelled grenade knocked him out and shrapnel tore at his flesh. When he roused, bleeding from several wounds, he grabbed his M-4 carbine, an M-12 shotgun and grenades, fighting back hard while directing airstrikes. "When I came to, I gathered my faculties as much as I could," Harvell recalled Thursday after a ceremony at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.
...
Harvell, a native of Long Beach, Calif., and father of a 9-month-old daughter, is the first Air Force Combat Controller to receive multiple Silver Stars in a single ceremony, officials said.
...
"Sean and Evan's actions were extraordinary and heroic," said Lt. Col. Bryan H. Cannady, commander of the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron. He applauded their "warrior ethos" and "face-to-face, anytime, anyplace" dedication to duty.
"It's quite an honor," Harvell said after the one-hour ceremony.
...
Sean R. Harvell and Evan P. Jones, the Air Force presented these medals Thursday at McChord Field.
...
Sean Harvell for his actions during multiple firefights with enemy forces in Afghanistan during spring and summer 2007.
In the first engagement, Sergeant Harvell and his coalition unit were completing a reconnaissance patrol through heavily contested Taliban territory. The team was ambushed and engaged the enemy in
CCTer's Earm Big Time Medals
www.sgtmacsbar.com [cached]
Sean Harvell, a Combat Controller with the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron at JB Lewis-McChord, Wash., for his actions during multiple firefights in Afghanistan in 2007. At a joint ceremony April 29 honoring several Combat Controllers (see additional entries below), Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz presented Harvell his medals.
...
During one engagement, Harvell deliberately exposed his position so he could coordinate close air support during an intense 23-hour firefight. In another, when Taliban forces attacked his team as they responded to a US helicopter crash, Harvell was wounded and knocked unconscious, but he recovered, returning fire and directing danger-close CAS. And in a third, following a rolling, three-day engagement, Harvell repeatedly exposed his position during an eight-hour firefight, provided covering fire as his team withdrew, and then coordinated CAS for their replacements.
The Air Force has awarded two Silver Stars, the third highest award for valor, to SSgt. Sean Harvell, a Combat Controller with the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron at JB Lewis-McChord, Wash., for his actions during multiple firefights in Afghanistan in 2007. At a joint ceremony April 29, 2010, honoring several Combat Controllers, Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz presented Harvell his medals.
...
Pictured; Sean Harvell to the left and Evan Jones to the right; sent by Gene Johnson, McChord CCT Photographer
...
Sean Harvell dodged the gunfire again, covering his team as he went.
Then he called in airstrikes that reportedly killed more than 50 insurgents in Central Afghanistan's Helmand River area.
Those were the local airman's heroics on just one day, "during a savage eight-hour firefight," according to his Air Force citation.
It earned Harvell a Silver Star award. He earned another two months earlier.
A rocket-propelled grenade knocked him out and shrapnel tore at his flesh. When he roused, bleeding from several wounds, he grabbed his M-4 carbine, an M-12 shotgun and grenades, fighting back hard while directing airstrikes.
"When I came to, I gathered my faculties as much as I could," Harvell recalled Thursday after a ceremony at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.
...
Harvell, a native of Long Beach, Calif., and father of a 9-month-old daughter, is the first Air Force Combat Controller to receive multiple Silver Stars in a single ceremony, officials said.
...
"Sean and Evan's actions were extraordinary and heroic," said Lt. Col. Bryan H. Cannady, commander of the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron. He applauded their "warrior ethos" and "face-to-face, anytime, anyplace" dedication to duty.
"It's quite an honor," Harvell said after the one-hour ceremony.
...
Sean R. Harvell and Evan P. Jones, the Air Force presented these medals Thursday at McChord Field.
...
Sean Harvell for his actions during multiple firefights with enemy forces in Afghanistan during spring and summer 2007.
In the first engagement, Sergeant Harvell and his coalition unit were completing a reconnaissance patrol through heavily contested Taliban territory. The team was ambushed and engaged the enemy in a firefight for nearly 23 hours. In order to coordinate close-air support, Sergeant Harvell deliberately exposed his position. Though surrounded by enemy fire, he continued to calmly direct air attacks, including a fighter strafing run within 45 feet of his own position.
...
In addition to Sergeants Harvell and Jones, nine other Combat Controllers received commendations.
Andy Harvell, KIA Afghanistan
www.sgtmacsbar.com [cached]
Andy's brother, Sean Harvell is also a Combat Controller
Sean is about two years older than his brother and in April 2010, Sean, an Air Force staff sergeant, was awarded two Silver Stars as a Combat Controller while under enemy fire in Afghanistan.
...
Sean Harvell.
...
Coincidentally, Harvell's older brother, Sean, was awarded two Silver Stars for action in Afghanistan in May and July of 2007.
The Air Force cited Sean Harvell for putting himself in the line of enemy fire to direct air support that killed hundreds of enemy combatants during battles in May and July 2007.
...
Sean Harvell.
...
"As an older brother, I looked up to him," Sean Harvell said "As Andy always said 'victory or Valhalla.' See you in Valhalla, brother."
...
Sean Harvell (also a USAF Combat Controller), and sister Analese Eder.
McChord AFB CCTers Earn Awards
www.sgtmacsbar.com, 29 April 2010 [cached]
Sean Harvell, a combat controller with the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron at JB Lewis-McChord, Wash., for his actions during multiple firefights in Afghanistan in 2007. At a joint ceremony April 29 honoring several combat controllers (see additional entries below), Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz presented Harvell his medals.
...
During one engagement, Harvell deliberately exposed his position so he could coordinate close air support during an intense 23-hour firefight. In another, when Taliban forces attacked his team as they responded to a US helicopter crash, Harvell was wounded and knocked unconscious, but he recovered, returning fire and directing danger-close CAS. And in a third, following a rolling, three-day engagement, Harvell repeatedly exposed his position during an eight-hour firefight, provided covering fire as his team withdrew, and then coordinated CAS for their replacements.
The Air Force has awarded two Silver Stars, the third highest award for valor, to SSgt. Sean Harvell, a combat controller with the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron at JB Lewis-McChord, Wash., for his actions during multiple firefights in Afghanistan in 2007. At a joint ceremony April 29, 2010, honoring several combat controllers, Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz presented Harvell his medals.
...
Pictured; Sean Harvell to the left and Evan Jones to the right; sent by Gene Johnson, McChord CCT Photographer
...
Sean Harvell dodged the gunfire again, covering his team as he went.
Then he called in airstrikes that reportedly killed more than 50 insurgents in Central Afghanistan's Helmand River area.
Those were the local airman's heroics on just one day, "during a savage eight-hour firefight," according to his Air Force citation.
It earned Harvell a Silver Star award. He earned another two months earlier.
A rocket-propelled grenade knocked him out and shrapnel tore at his flesh. When he roused, bleeding from several wounds, he grabbed his M-4 carbine, an M-12 shotgun and grenades, fighting back hard while directing airstrikes.
"When I came to, I gathered my faculties as much as I could," Harvell recalled Thursday after a ceremony at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.
...
Harvell, a native of Long Beach, Calif., and father of a 9-month-old daughter, is the first Air Force combat controller to receive multiple Silver Stars in a single ceremony, officials said.
...
"Sean and Evan's actions were extraordinary and heroic," said Lt. Col. Bryan H. Cannady, commander of the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron. He applauded their "warrior ethos" and "face-to-face, anytime, anyplace" dedication to duty.
"It's quite an honor," Harvell said after the one-hour ceremony.
...
Sean R. Harvell and Evan P. Jones, the Air Force presented these medals Thursday at McChord Field.
...
Sean Harvell for his actions during multiple firefights with enemy forces in Afghanistan during spring and summer 2007.
In the first engagement, Sergeant Harvell and his coalition unit were completing a reconnaissance patrol through heavily contested Taliban territory. The team was ambushed and engaged the enemy in a firefight for nearly 23 hours. In order to coordinate close-air support, Sergeant Harvell deliberately exposed his position. Though surrounded by enemy fire, he continued to calmly direct air attacks, including a fighter strafing run within 45 feet of his own position.
...
In addition to Sergeants Harvell and Jones, nine other combat controllers received commendations.
Sean Harvell dodged the gunfire ...
www.bellinghamherald.com, 30 April 2010 [cached]
Sean Harvell dodged the gunfire again, covering his team as he went.
Then he called in airstrikes that reportedly killed more than 50 insurgents in Central Afghanistan's Helmand River area.
...
It earned Harvell a Silver Star award. He earned another two months earlier.
A rocket-propelled grenade knocked him out and shrapnel tore at his flesh. When he roused, bleeding from several wounds, he grabbed his M-4 carbine, an M-12 shotgun and grenades, fighting back hard while directing airstrikes.
"When I came to, I gathered my faculties as much as I could," Harvell recalled Thursday after a ceremony at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.
...
Harvell, a native of Long Beach, Calif., and father of a 9-month-old daughter, is the first Air Force combat controller to receive multiple Silver Stars in a single ceremony, officials said.
...
"Sean and Evan's actions were extraordinary and heroic," said Lt. Col. Bryan H. Cannady, commander of the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron. He applauded their "warrior ethos" and "face-to-face, anytime, anyplace" dedication to duty.
"It's quite an honor," Harvell said after the one-hour ceremony.
...
Sean R. Harvell and Evan P. Jones, the Air Force presented these medals Thursday at McChord Field.
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