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Wrong Scott Trabue?

Scott Trabue

Owner

Bob's Wild Horse Tours

HQ Phone:  (252) 453-8602

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Bob's Wild Horse Tours

817 B Ocean Trail Highway 12

Corolla, North Carolina,27927

United States

Company Description

Bob’s Corolla Wild Horse Tours, has been Corolla’s #1 source for family fun since 1996. We offer different guided tours to see the Corolla Wild Horses. ...more

Find other employees at this company (1)

Web References(3 Total References)


StarNewsOnline.com: The Voice of Southeastern North Carolina

www.wilmingtonstar.com [cached]

Business owners like Scott Trabue of Wild Horse Safari say they accept that one day the horses will be gone, but perhaps not without a fight."I have never been political but I am ready to jump into the fray because I want to save the horses," Trabue said.Trabue's passion for the horses does not begin with his tour business.He has been around the ponies since 1993 when traffic and human encroachment began to threaten the animals as they freely roamed a busy, commercially oriented Corolla.In 1994, a road sign along N.C. Highway 12 in Corolla informed drivers that 14 horses had been killed by vehicles and to drive carefully.That is the same year the Wild Horse Fund began making plans to move the ponies up the beach to secluded Carova."I was one of those people against moving the horses out of town," Trabue recalled."I loved them so much.But I wasn't thinking correctly in those days."One night, driving home along N.C. 12, Trabue heard the unmistakable sound of hooves galloping atop pavement.Without benefit of seeing the horses, he stopped his car in time to miss a herd of horses crossing the road.Trabue said it was at that moment he realized the horses must live in the roadless, Carova Beach area for their own safety.These days the business-owner enjoys seeing the herd and enjoys watching tourists awe-struck at the site of a mare and her foal."They are magical," Trabue said.During a busy summer season, Trabue said his tour guides will take as many as 10,000 people to see the horses.At $46 per adult, and half price for children, Trabue's tours can bring in anywhere from $300,000 to $460,000 per season.Bob White, owner of Bob's Wild Horse Tours, said he averages about 15 tours a day with as few as six and as many as nine people per tour.He estimates an average four month season of tours takes in about $100,000.White also sees looming development in Carova as a threat to his business, but he said he is remaining realistic about the future.As for horse-related businesses, White and Trabue both say they have other business ventures and when the horse trade dies, they will find another way to capitalize on tourism along the Outer Banks.


heraldsun.com: Development, wild horse tourism con...

www.heraldsun.com [cached]

Business owners like Scott Trabue of Wild Horse Safari say they accept that one day the horses will be gone, but perhaps not without a fight. "I have never been political but I am ready to jump into the fray because I want to save the horses," Trabue said. Trabue's passion for the horses does not begin with his tour business.He has been around the ponies since 1993 when traffic and human encroachment began to threaten the animals as they freely roamed a busy, commercially oriented Corolla. In 1994, a road sign along N.C. Highway 12 in Corolla informed drivers that 14 horses had been killed by vehicles and to drive carefully.That is the same year the Wild Horse Fund began making plans to move the ponies up the beach to secluded Carova. "I was one of those people against moving the horses out of town," Trabue recalled."I loved them so much.But I wasn't thinking correctly in those days." One night, driving home along N.C. 12, Trabue heard the unmistakable sound of hooves galloping atop pavement.Without benefit of seeing the horses, he stopped his car in time to miss a herd of horses crossing the road. Trabue said it was at that moment he realized the horses must live in the roadless, Carova Beach area for their own safety.These days the business-owner enjoys seeing the herd and enjoys watching tourists awe-struck at the site of a mare and her foal. "They are magical," Trabue said. During a busy summer season, Trabue said his tour guides will take as many as 10,000 people to see the horses.At $46 per adult, and half price for children, Trabue's tours can bring in anywhere from $300,000 to $460,000 per season. Bob White, owner of Bob's Wild Horse Tours, said he averages about 15 tours a day with as few as six and as many as nine people per tour.He estimates an average four month season of tours takes in about $100,000. White also sees looming development in Carova as a threat to his business, but he said he is remaining realistic about the future. As for horse-related businesses, White and Trabue both say they have other business ventures and when the horse trade dies, they will find another way to capitalize on tourism along the Outer Banks.


Development trumps wild horse tourism

www.dailyadvance.com [cached]

Business owners like Scott Trabue of Wild Horse Safari say they accept that one day the horses will be gone, but perhaps not without a fight. "I have never been political but I am ready to jump into the fray because I want to save the horses," Trabue said. Trabue's passion for the horses does not begin with his tour business.He has been around the ponies since 1993 when traffic and human encroachment began to threaten the animals as they freely roamed a busy, commercially-oriented Corolla. In 1994, a road sign along N.C. Highway 12 in Corolla informed drivers that 14 horses had been killed by vehicles and to drive carefully.That is the same year the Wild Horse Fund began making plans to move the ponies up the beach to secluded Carova. "I was one of those people against moving the horses out of town," Trabue recalled."I loved them so much.But I wasn't thinking correctly in those days." One night, driving home along N.C. 12, Trabue heard the unmistakable sound of hooves galloping atop pavement.Without benefit of seeing the horses, he stopped his car in time to miss a herd of horses crossing the road. Trabue said it was at that moment he realized the horses must live in the roadless, Carova Beach area for their own safety.These days the business-owner enjoys seeing the herd and enjoys watching tourists awestruck at the site of a mare and her foal. "They are magical," Trabue said. During a busy summer season, Trabue said his tour guides will take as many as 10,000 people to see the horses.At $46 per adult, and half price for children, Trabue's tours can bring in anywhere from $300,000 to $460,000 per season. Bob White, owner of Bob's Wild Horse Tours, said he averages about 15 tours a day with as few as six and as many as nine people per tour.He estimates an average four month season of tours takes in about $100,000. White also sees looming development in Carova as a threat to his business, but he said he is remaining realistic about the future. As for horse-related businesses, White and Trabue both say they have other business ventures and when the horse trade dies, they will find another way to capitalize on tourism along the Outer Banks.


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