Scott Leslie O'Neill

Professor at The University of Queensland

Location:
St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Company:
The University of Queensland
HQ Phone:
+61 7 3365 1111
Wrong Scott O'Neill?

Last Updated 11/6/2017

General Information

Employment History

Program Director  - World Mosquito Program

Medical Entomologist  - University of Sydney

Head  - UQ Business School

Education

BSc  - University of Sydney

PhD  - Entomology , The University of Queensland

Affiliations

Director of the Institute of Vector-Borne Disease  - Monash University

Fellow  - Australian Academy of Science

Fellow  - American Association for the Advancement of Science

Postdoctoral Fellow  - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Web References  

http://www.mosquitoage.org/en/RESEARCH/OurGlobalTeam.aspx

Prof. Scott O'Neill
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Scott O'Neill is the project leader and coordinates the different aspects of the project to ensure the outlined objectives are achieved. Prof. O'Neill's research team is one of the leading Wolbachia research groups in the world. Her research group will work closely with Prof. O'Neill understand the baseline relationship between mosquito age and dengue transmission in Thailand.

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Prof. Scott O'Neill, Program Director | World Mosquito Program

Prof. Scott O'Neill, Program Director
Professor Scott O'Neill (PhD FAA FAAAS) is the Director of the Institute of Vector-Borne Disease at Monash University. He has spent his academic career at the University of Illinois, Yale University, the University of Queensland and Monash University where until recently he was the Dean of Science. Scott leads a large international not-for-profit initiative that works to protect the global community from mosquito-borne diseases, the World Mosquito Program.

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Culex Environmental - Mosquito Management: Home

"'It will be particularly interesting to see if Wolbachia infections can interfere with mosquito transmission of the major human pathogens like Plasmodium' -- the causative agent of malaria -- 'and dengue viruses,'" according to Scott O'Neill of the University of Queensland (Bland, 10/1).

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