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Wrong Scott Koenig?

Scott D. Koenig

City Manager

City of Dover

HQ Phone:  (302) 736-5087

Direct Phone: (302) ***-****direct phone

Email: s***@***.us

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

City of Dover

15 Loockerman Plaza

Dover, Delaware,19901

United States

Company Description

The City of Dover is located in central Delaware in Kent County and is the capital of Delaware. Dover is approximately 90 miles south of Philadelphia, Pa., and 90 miles east of Washington, D.C. While its population is significantly less than that of Wilmington...more

Background Information

Affiliations

The MPO

Member, Technical Advisory Committee


Education

degrees

Civil Engineering and Public Administration

University of Delaware


degrees

Civil Engineering and Public Administration

Virginia Tech


Web References(49 Total References)


NEWS RELEASES

www.doverkentmpo.org [cached]

Roberta G. "Bobbie" Geier, and Scott D. Koenig were recently voted chair and vice-chair, respectively, of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to the Dover/Kent County MPO )Metropolitan Planning Organization).
Mr. Koenig, also of Dover, is Director of Public Works with the City of Dover, where his responsibilities include the water/sewer utility, sanitation, streets, facilities management, construction, engineering, and administration. He holds degrees in Civil Engineering and Public Administration from Virginia Tech and the University of Delaware. Roberta G. "Bobbie" Geier , and Scott D. Koenig were voted chair and vice-chair, respectively, of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC). Mr. Koenig, also of Dover, is Director of Public Works with the City of Dover, where his responsibilities include the water/sewer utility, sanitation, streets, facilities management, construction, engineering, and administration. He holds degrees in Civil Engineering and Public Administration from Virginia Tech and the University of Delaware. Dover (DE) -- Roberta G. "Bobbie" Geier, and Scott D. Koenig were recently voted chair and vice chair, respectively, of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to the Dover Kent County MPO (Metropolitan Planning Organization). Mr. Koenig, also of Dover, is Director of Public Works with the City of Dover, where his responsibilities include the water/sewer utility, sanitation, streets, facilities management, construction, engineering, and administration. He holds degrees in Civil Engineering and Public Administration from Virginia Tech and the University of Delaware.


Business Ledger: Engineering News

www.ncbl.com [cached]

The awards were selected by a panel of distinguished judges including Delaware State Representative Timothy U. Boulden, Mr. Scott Koenig P.E., Director, City of Dover Department of Public Works, and Dr. Michael Chajes, chair, University of Delaware Department of civil and Environmental Engineering.


City of Dover - Capital of the First State

www.cityofdover.com [cached]

Scott KoenigPublic WorksE-Mail : skoenig@dover.de.usPhone : ( 302 ) 736-7025 or ( 302 ) 736-7020Support ServicesB. J. ClyburnE-Mail : bclyburn@dover.de.usPhone : ( 302 ) 736-7046


www.doverpost.com

The cleaning operations generated a lot of noise, especially in the early morning, causing several nearby homeowners to complain, Dover City Manager Scott Koenig said.
"The first day, there were a lot of unhappy people," Koenig said. Koenig said the upcoming city budget estimates Dover stands to receive about $1.6 million in new water and wastewater fee revenue from Calpine. The plant also will become Dover's number one patron when it comes to water usage, he said. "It's going to place a huge demand on our water system," Koenig said. "They'll become our largest water customer overnight." The city relies on 20 deep- and shallow-production wells to supply water to both residential and commercial clients, which will be sufficient to support the plant, Koenig said. However, if the company eventually decides to double the size of the plant, the city will have a search for additional water resources, he said. Page 2 of 2 - Koenig envisions a temporary increase in brown water complaints once that happens once the plant starts production. The brown water - which although not aesthetically pleasing is otherwise considered harmless - results from changes in the direction and pressure of water moving through the city's 220-plus miles of pipeline. That problem should clear up once the city's water system adjusts to the additional load, he said. Koenig added there is continuing progress at other parcels in the Garrison Oaks site. The Uzin Utz flooring plant is nearing completion, additional work is being done on water and sewer infrastructure and a large water tower is under construction. "Now that [Calpine] is coming to an end, we can focus additional attention on developing the balance of the lots in the park," Koenig said. "We've had some additional bites, but we don't have any signed agreements," he said. "We're getting closer."


www.doverpost.com

The key to success will be encouraging investors to commit their time and money to downtown Dover, said Dover City Manager Scott Koenig.
That includes not only Loockerman Street, but also side streets to the north and south, he said. "We're in a transition," Koenig said. "There's been investment in parts of the downtown, such as the library, Wesley College and the new courthouse, but these are large scale projects." Those projects have meant a combined investment of almost $111 million by the city, Wesley College and Kent County. But other types of investment are needed, Koenig added. "There is significant need for medium- and small-scale development," he said. "We need to run the gamut of all kinds of downtown redevelopment. There already has been significant public investment, but there still is room for significant improvement." That includes projects outside the immediate downtown area, such as solving the flooding problem along Water Street, which could cost up to $15 million; replacing aging water lines; and burying utility lines along Division Street to improve the visual aesthetics of the roadway. "These are expensive projects, in some cases requiring public investment that needs to happen over time," Koenig said. This was somewhat successful, garnering interest for about 20 projects, Koenig said. "It would be great if we had a large number of people investing in the program," he said. While the city would welcome commercial redevelopment, Koenig said housing also cannot be overlooked when it comes to establishing a Downtown Development District. "We need to strike a balance between business and housing stock that people can afford to live in," he said. "What we want to do is improve the quality of our building stock downtown, with new, modern buildings that meet codes, as well as trying to meet the needs for different levels of affordable housing. What we don't want to do is convert it to all-commercial districts and move all the people living there out." Having people live within a short distance of where they work is an appealing scenario, Koenig said. "For a city the size of Dover, the potential of having people living there and being able to walk to work is attractive," he said. New commercial development and improvements to the downtown housing supply also will help deter crime, giving police a chance to focus their efforts elsewhere, Koenig added.


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