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Sara Roahen

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Gambit Weekly

HQ Phone:  (504) 486-5900

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Gambit Weekly

3923 Bienville St.

New Orleans, Louisiana,70119

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Writer

The Times of Acadiana


Affiliations

Southern Foodways Alliance

Board Member


Oral

Historian


Slow Food USA

Member of the Ark-Presidia


Education

BA

History of Science and Philosophy

St. John's College


Web References(126 Total References)


www.bestofneworleans.com

By Frank Etheridge, Kandace Power Graves, Allen Johnson Jr, Eileen Loh Harrist, David Winkler-Schmit, Katy Reckdahl, Sara Roahen, David Lee Simmons and Michael Tisserand Oct 20, 2003


louisianabooknews.com [cached]

Sara Roahen moved to New Orleans when her husband was accepted into medical school.
A former vegetarian from the Midwest with culinary experience, she obtained a job as restaurant critic for the city's alternative newspaper, Gambit Weekly, and sought to understand the food scene of the Big Easy, which wasn't so easy for a vegetarian from the Midwest. "Sara Roahen's empathetic tales of time at table in New Orleans will break your heart and rile your stomach," writes John R. Edge, author of Southern Belly: The Ultimate Food Lover's Companion to the South Note: Roahen explains in Gumbo Tales that turducken could be the invention of the Hebert brothers of Maurice despite Chef Paul Prudhomme introducing it to New Orleans, but sites a few sources that show no one really knows for sure. "Whoever made the first turducken, the Hebert brothers' boneless chicken with spicy pork stuffing is worth the two-and-a-half-hour drive from New Orleans to Maurice with an ice chest; and whatever its origins, in spirit the turducken is 100 percent Chef Paul," Roahen writes.


www.southernfoodways.com [cached]

Edited by Sara Roahen


www.texasbookfestival.org [cached]

Sara Roahen
Texas Book Festival - Sara Roahen Sara Roahen at the 2008 Texas Book Festival Sara Roahen Roahen, a Wisconsin native but a New Orleanian at heart, takes readers on a gastronomic journey through the culinary traditions of her adopted city in her descriptive, personal, and informative book Gumbo Tales: Finding My Place at the New Orleans Table. "Alas, no amount of eating or cooking earns a nonnative membership in that society of Louisianians who were born with roux in their genes and weaned on shellfish stocks and sticky bits of okra. ... There is, thankfully, a silver lining to never belonging: devoid of an inbred gumbo bias, I'm open to appreciating the full spectrum of gumbos without the hindrance of a gold standard. It's a great luxury in a town like this one," she writes. More than just describing the flavors of New Orleans cuisine, Roahen lovingly researches the history of the Crescent City's many signature dishes, including its innumerable gumbos and po-boys, as well as its lesser-known ethnic specialties like Vietnamese pho and Italian red gravy. Giving readers a sense of the importance of food to the culture of a pre-Katrina New Orleans, Roahen also illustrates the continued importance of food in piecing the city and its community back together after the levees broke. Roahen was a restaurant critic for New Orleans' Gambit Weekly and her writing has appeared in Food & Wine, Gourmet, Tin House, Wine & Spirits, Best Food Writing 2003, and Food and Booze: A Tin House Literary Feast.


www.gambitweekly.com [cached]

Sara RoahenGambit Weekly Author ArchivesSara Roahen


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