Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 4/12/06  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

Education

  • Richland High School
  • degree , bookkeeping
    Howard Payne University
Web References
Finding Lucy
www.dalworthlpa.org, 12 April 2006 [cached]
Wes and Sandy Rapp, half a world away from their suburban home near Fort Worth, are not flustered by the attention, the jet lag, or even the sensory overload that is Taipei.
...
"This feels right," Sandy Rapp, 48, whispers with conviction as she dodges the congestion of taxis and motorized scooters at an intersection.
Only the night before, they had arrived after flying nearly 8,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean to this island off the coast of mainland China.Only the night before, in a brief, quiet and tender greeting at the airport, had they first met Lu Chiu-ting, the girl they will call Lucy, the girl they are prepared to love unconditionally.
Sandy Rapp, 48, and Wes Rapp, 41, have encountered and scaled most of the obstacles their new daughter will face.
...
Sandy is a computer graphics designer for L3 Communications, a flight simulation company in Arlington.
...
"My mother told me that those people just thought they were being charitable," Sandy Rapp says.
She learned early that the world would not understand her, and that steeled her resolve to prove her capabilities.She graduated in 1972 from Richland High School in North Richland Hills, where her family had moved from El Paso.Then she earned a degree in bookkeeping from Howard Payne University in Brownwood.
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of the Dalworth Metropolitan Chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of the Dalworth Metropolitan Chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
...
Meanwhile, Wes and Sandy Rapp were in Texas, where they were meeting parents of average height who had dwarf children.
...
We know about the medical problems, the trouble getting shoes and clothes, the teasing," Sandy Rapp says.
Many dwarf women are able to give birth, but Sandy Rapp's particularly short stature presented problems, and the couple worried that she could not carry a child to term.
"I looked at my short torso and thought: 'My goodness, where would I put a baby!' " Sandy Rapp says.
The Rapps had a friend on the adoption committee of the Little People of America.The committee contacts orphanages around the world to let them know that dwarfs are adoptable.
"Very few dwarfs are available through U.S. agencies.People here aren't as likely to give them up for adoption anymore," Sandy Rapp says."It's more socially acceptable here, but that isn't the way in all countries."
E-mail photos of small children from orphanages around the world would arrive on the Rapps' computer, courtesy of their friend on the adoption committee.
"Nothing pulled on my heartstrings until I saw Lucy," Sandy Rapp says.
...
Sandy Rapp called Sen.
...
Sandy Rapp asked.
...
I want her to come to us when she's ready," Sandy Rapp says.
Lucy waits in the arms of Taiwanese social workers.She waves.She stares.She eyes the small scooter that Sandy Rapp carried along on the airplane.
...
At the airport, Sandy Rapp gives her new daughter a ride on the scooter.
...
"I was afraid of that," Sandy Rapp says.
...
Sandy Rapp teaches Lucy the song Itsy Bitsy Spider and Lucy follows along with the hand movements.Sandy Rapp is ready to launch into I'm a Little Teapot, but she can't remember the words.
Lucy's visa is approved in less than an hour.
Two days later, the Rapps leave with Lucy, who throws a crying fit that ends abruptly at the airplane door.
Laughter and tears
The new family arrives home Dec. 19 to a house decorated for Christmas by Sandy Rapp's sister while they were away.
It's a blur of activity here, as well.A trip to Wal-Mart.An unsuccessful introduction to Mexican food.An appointment with a doctor to clear up a cough.A visit to Mehl's Shoeland in Fort Worth, the only place Sandy Rapp has been able to find shoes that fit.She wears a size 1E.Dwarves often have short but particularly wide feet.They are often stuck wearing childlike styles and shoes that are far too long for them in order to get the width right.The Rapps discard Lucy's baby-girl pink shoes and find her a more age-appropriate style of tennis shoe that fits.This is important to Sandy Rapp.
"We do have to shop in children's departments.But we don't want to look like children.I can't have a shirt with little bears and Pocahontas running across it and walk into a meeting," she says.
She wants the same for her daughter.
Lucy will start school Tuesday at Florence Elementary School in the Keller school district.She's enrolled in an English as a second language class.Sandy Rapp feels sure she will learn quickly because already Lucy understands, though doesn't speak, a lot of English.
She is settling into the Rapps' home, though sometimes she gets up in the middle of the night to sleep on folded blankets on the floor, because that is how she always slept at the orphanage.
...
Wes and Sandy Rapp could barely stop laughing.
Leader-Telegram Online
www.leadertelegram.com, 2 Feb 2003 [cached]
Wes, left, and Sandy Rapp played Candyland with their newly adopted daughter, Lucy, who came to Texas from Taiwan just before Christmas.
...
Wes and Sandy Rapp, half a world away from their suburban home near Fort Worth, Texas, are not flustered by the attention, the jet lag, or even the sensory overload that is Taipei.
...
"This feels right," Sandy Rapp, 48, whispers with conviction as she dodges the congestion of taxis and motorized scooters at an intersection.
Only the night before, they had arrived after flying nearly 8,000 miles from Dallas, across the Pacific Ocean, to this island off the coast of mainland China.
...
Sandy Rapp, 48, and Wes Rapp, 41, have encountered and scaled most of the obstacles their new daughter will face.
...
Sandy is a computer graphics designer for L3 Communications, a flight simulation company in Arlington, Texas.Wes drives, with the help of pedal extensions, a 24-foot Peterbilt truck for Ellison Trucking in Lewisville, Texas.
They know how to move forward in a world that takes place largely above their heads but not outside their abilities, and it is this that they are driven to share with a child.
Finding a soul mate
...
"My mother told me that those people just thought they were being charitable," Sandy Rapp says.
She learned early that the world would not understand her, and that steeled her resolve to prove her capabilities.She graduated in 1972 from Richland High School in North Richland Hills near Fort Worth, where her family had moved from El Paso.Then she earned a degree in bookkeeping from Howard Payne University.
When she met Wes Rapp, she knew she'd found someone with similar attitudes about how to get by in life.
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of a local chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of a local chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
The Ledger: Lakeland, Polk County, Florida
www.theledger.com, 9 Jan 2003 [cached]
Wes and Sandy Rapp, half a world away from their suburban home near Fort Worth, Texas, are not flustered by the attention, the jet lag, or even the sensory overload that is Taipei.
...
Sandy Rapp, 48, and Wes Rapp, 41, have encountered and scaled most of the obstacles their new daughter will face.
...
Sandy is a computer graphics designer for L3 Communications, a flight simulation company in Arlington, Texas.Wes drives, with the help of pedal extensions, a 24-foot Peterbilt truck for Ellison Trucking in Lewisville, Texas.
They know how to move forward in a world that takes place largely above their heads but not outside their abilities, and it is this that they are driven to share with a child.
...
"My mother told me that those people just thought they were being charitable," Sandy Rapp says.
She learned early that the world would not understand her, and that steeled her resolve to prove her capabilities.She graduated in 1972 from Richland High School in North Richland Hills near Fort Worth, where her family had moved from El Paso.Then she earned a degree in bookkeeping from Howard Payne University in nearby Brownwood.
When she met Wes Rapp, she knew she'd found someone with similar attitudes about how to get by in life.
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of the Dalworth Metropolitan Chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of the Dalworth Metropolitan Chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
...
Meanwhile, Wes and Sandy Rapp were in Texas, where they were meeting parents of average height who had dwarf children.
...
We know about the medical problems, the trouble getting shoes and clothes, the teasing," Sandy Rapp says.
Many dwarf women are able to give birth, but Sandy Rapp's particularly short stature presented problems, and the couple worried that she could not carry a child to term.
"I looked at my short torso and thought: `My goodness, where would I put a baby!' " Sandy Rapp says.
The Rapps had a friend on the adoption committee of the Little People of America.The committee contacts orphanages around the world to let them know that dwarfs are adoptable.
"Very few dwarfs are available through U.S. agencies.People here aren't as likely to give them up for adoption anymore," Sandy Rapp says."It's more socially acceptable here, but that isn't the way in all countries."
E-mail photos of small children from orphanages around the world would arrive on the Rapps' computer, courtesy of their friend on the adoption committee.
"Nothing pulled on my heartstrings until I saw Lucy," Sandy Rapp says."She looks so much like me when I was her age."
That was in February 2002, when the adoption process started rolling.The Rapps contacted an adoption agency in Ohio specializing in international adoptions and prepared to pay the $4,000 adoption fee to Cathwel Service, a far lesser amount than normal because Lucy was considered not just a hard-to-adopt child but also a probable permanent resident of the orphanage.In October, a Taiwanese judge finalized the order allowing the Rapps to adopt Lucy.But the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service processing of permits moved too slowly for Lucy to be escorted by a Taiwanese Catholic family coming to visit the United States in the fall.
...
Sandy Rapp called Sen.
...
Sandy Rapp asked.Up to this point, they had only communicated with their new daughter via Sister Rosa, who translated their messages into Chinese.
Then they got on the plane.
A DIFFERENT WORLD
...
I want her to come to us when she's ready," Sandy Rapp says.
Lucy waits in the arms of Taiwanese social workers.She waves.She stares.She eyes the small scooter that Sandy Rapp carried along on the airplane.
...
At the airport, Sandy Rapp gives her new daughter a ride on the scooter.Then they climb in a taxi, little Lucy propped up in Wes Rapp's lap.The Rapps soon learn that she knows a few words in English: Mama.Papa.McDonald's.
The next two days are a blur of activity.
Cathwel Service sets up activities to help the Rapps learn about Lucy's life in Taiwan and to allow Lucy to see her new parents in familiar settings.They shuttle the family to the 3,000-student Peitou Elementary School for a goodbye party in Lucy's special education class, where she had been placed with students with mental disabilities -- not because of her intelligence, but because the school was afraid she might get hurt in a class with taller, more robust kids.
"I was afraid of that," Sandy Rapp says."Just because we are little, doesn't mean we have little minds."
The Taiwanese media has gotten wind of the story of the American dwarfs coming to adopt Lucy.Four television stations send teams of reporters and cameras to interview a rather dazed-looking Lucy and her patient new parents.
Cathwel Service workers bring the Rapps to a goodbye party for Lucy at the orphanage, where about 50 youngsters under age 18 live.
...
Sandy Rapp teaches Lucy the song "Itsy Bitsy Spider" and Lucy follows along with the hand movements.Sandy Rapp is ready to launch into "I'm a Little Teapot," but she can't remember the words.
Lucy's visa is approved in less than an hour.
Two days later, the Rapps leave with Lucy, who throws a crying fit that ends abruptly at the airplane door.
LAUGHTER AND TEARS
The new family arrives home Dec. 19 to a house decorated for Christmas by Sandy Rapp's sister while they were away.
...
A visit to Mehl's Shoeland in Fort Worth, the only place Sandy Rapp has been able to find shoes that fit.She wears a size 1E.Dwarves often have short but particularly wide feet.They are often stuck wearing childlike styles and shoes that are far too long for them in order to get the width right.The Rapps discard Lucy's baby-girl pink shoes and find her a more age-appropriate style of tennis shoe that fits.This is important to Sandy Rapp.
"We do have to shop in children's departments.But we don't want to look like children.I can't have a shirt with little bears and Pocahontas running across it and walk into a meeting," she says.
She wants the same for her daughter.
Lucy will attend school at Florence Elementary School in the Keller school district north of Fort Worth.She's enrolled in an English as a Second Language class.Sandy Rapp feels sure she will learn quickly because already Lucy understands, though doesn't speak, a lot of English.
She is settling into the Rapps' home, though sometimes she gets up in the middle of the night to sleep on folded blankets on the floor, because that is how she always slept at the orphanage.
The Rapps must still get a court order for adoption in the United States, but the most difficult parts of the process are behind them now.
Already there have been tears for the Rapps to kiss away and moments of homesickness.
Already the Rapps have had the simple moments of joy that take place in family rooms across America, where parents chuckle at kids' antics and kids delight at the attention.
...
Wes and Sandy Rapp could barely stop laughing.
The Ledger: Lakeland, Polk County, Florida
www.theledger.com, 9 Jan 2003 [cached]
Wes and Sandy Rapp, half a world away from their suburban home near Fort Worth, Texas, are not flustered by the attention, the jet lag, or even the sensory overload that is Taipei.
...
Sandy Rapp, 48, and Wes Rapp, 41, have encountered and scaled most of the obstacles their new daughter will face.
...
Sandy is a computer graphics designer for L3 Communications, a flight simulation company in Arlington, Texas.Wes drives, with the help of pedal extensions, a 24-foot Peterbilt truck for Ellison Trucking in Lewisville, Texas.
They know how to move forward in a world that takes place largely above their heads but not outside their abilities, and it is this that they are driven to share with a child.
...
"My mother told me that those people just thought they were being charitable," Sandy Rapp says.
She learned early that the world would not understand her, and that steeled her resolve to prove her capabilities.She graduated in 1972 from Richland High School in North Richland Hills near Fort Worth, where her family had moved from El Paso.Then she earned a degree in bookkeeping from Howard Payne University in nearby Brownwood.
When she met Wes Rapp, she knew she'd found someone with similar attitudes about how to get by in life.
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of the Dalworth Metropolitan Chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
...
Sandy and Wes dated for a year after meeting in a Red Lobster restaurant at a 1991 gathering of the Dalworth Metropolitan Chapter of the Little People of America, an association that provides information and support for people of short stature. (Some members prefer to be called "little people" rather than dwarfs, but Sandy and Wes Rapp don't use that euphemism.)
...
Meanwhile, Wes and Sandy Rapp were in Texas, where they were meeting parents of average height who had dwarf children.
...
We know about the medical problems, the trouble getting shoes and clothes, the teasing," Sandy Rapp says.
Many dwarf women are able to give birth, but Sandy Rapp's particularly short stature presented problems, and the couple worried that she could not carry a child to term.
"I looked at my short torso and thought: `My goodness, where would I put a baby!' " Sandy Rapp says.
The Rapps had a friend on the adoption committee of the Little People of America.The committee contacts orphanages around the world to let them know that dwarfs are adoptable.
"Very few dwarfs are available through U.S. agencies.People here aren't as likely to give them up for adoption anymore," Sandy Rapp says."It's more socially acceptable here, but that isn't the way in all countries."
E-mail photos of small children from orphanages around the world would arrive on the Rapps' computer, courtesy of their friend on the adoption committee.
"Nothing pulled on my heartstrings until I saw Lucy," Sandy Rapp says."She looks so much like me when I was her age."
That was in February 2002, when the adoption process started rolling.The Rapps contacted an adoption agency in Ohio specializing in international adoptions and prepared to pay the $4,000 adoption fee to Cathwel Service, a far lesser amount than normal because Lucy was considered not just a hard-to-adopt child but also a probable permanent resident of the orphanage.In October, a Taiwanese judge finalized the order allowing the Rapps to adopt Lucy.But the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service processing of permits moved too slowly for Lucy to be escorted by a Taiwanese Catholic family coming to visit the United States in the fall.
...
Sandy Rapp called Sen.
...
Sandy Rapp asked.Up to this point, they had only communicated with their new daughter via Sister Rosa, who translated their messages into Chinese.
Then they got on the plane.
A DIFFERENT WORLD
...
I want her to come to us when she's ready," Sandy Rapp says.
Lucy waits in the arms of Taiwanese social workers.She waves.She stares.She eyes the small scooter that Sandy Rapp carried along on the airplane.
...
At the airport, Sandy Rapp gives her new daughter a ride on the scooter.Then they climb in a taxi, little Lucy propped up in Wes Rapp's lap.The Rapps soon learn that she knows a few words in English: Mama.Papa.McDonald's.
The next two days are a blur of activity.
Cathwel Service sets up activities to help the Rapps learn about Lucy's life in Taiwan and to allow Lucy to see her new parents in familiar settings.They shuttle the family to the 3,000-student Peitou Elementary School for a goodbye party in Lucy's special education class, where she had been placed with students with mental disabilities -- not because of her intelligence, but because the school was afraid she might get hurt in a class with taller, more robust kids.
"I was afraid of that," Sandy Rapp says."Just because we are little, doesn't mean we have little minds."
The Taiwanese media has gotten wind of the story of the American dwarfs coming to adopt Lucy.Four television stations send teams of reporters and cameras to interview a rather dazed-looking Lucy and her patient new parents.
Cathwel Service workers bring the Rapps to a goodbye party for Lucy at the orphanage, where about 50 youngsters under age 18 live.
...
Sandy Rapp teaches Lucy the song "Itsy Bitsy Spider" and Lucy follows along with the hand movements.Sandy Rapp is ready to launch into "I'm a Little Teapot," but she can't remember the words.
Lucy's visa is approved in less than an hour.
Two days later, the Rapps leave with Lucy, who throws a crying fit that ends abruptly at the airplane door.
LAUGHTER AND TEARS
The new family arrives home Dec. 19 to a house decorated for Christmas by Sandy Rapp's sister while they were away.
...
A visit to Mehl's Shoeland in Fort Worth, the only place Sandy Rapp has been able to find shoes that fit.She wears a size 1E.Dwarves often have short but particularly wide feet.They are often stuck wearing childlike styles and shoes that are far too long for them in order to get the width right.The Rapps discard Lucy's baby-girl pink shoes and find her a more age-appropriate style of tennis shoe that fits.This is important to Sandy Rapp.
"We do have to shop in children's departments.But we don't want to look like children.I can't have a shirt with little bears and Pocahontas running across it and walk into a meeting," she says.
She wants the same for her daughter.
Lucy will attend school at Florence Elementary School in the Keller school district north of Fort Worth.She's enrolled in an English as a Second Language class.Sandy Rapp feels sure she will learn quickly because already Lucy understands, though doesn't speak, a lot of English.
She is settling into the Rapps' home, though sometimes she gets up in the middle of the night to sleep on folded blankets on the floor, because that is how she always slept at the orphanage.
The Rapps must still get a court order for adoption in the United States, but the most difficult parts of the process are behind them now.
Already there have been tears for the Rapps to kiss away and moments of homesickness.
Already the Rapps have had the simple moments of joy that take place in family rooms across America, where parents chuckle at kids' antics and kids delight at the attention.
...
Wes and Sandy Rapp could barely stop laughing.
Contacts
www.dalworthlpa.org, 5 April 2007 [cached]
Sandy Rapp Treasurer 817-379-5323 rappws@juno.com
Other People with the name "Rapp":
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304