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This profile was last updated on 1/28/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Sandra Clements

Wrong Sandra Clements?

Disability Coordinator

Email: c***@***.edu
Marshall University
One John Marshall Drive
Huntington, West Virginia 25755
United States

Company Description: The MUFSC is dedicated to providing the highest quality forensic analysis for the promotion of truth and justice throughout West Virginia and the nation. MUFSC was...   more
Background

Employment History

30 Total References
Web References
Sandra Clements, the ...
www.herald-dispatch.com, 31 Mar 2011 [cached]
Sandra Clements, the coordinator of Disabled Students at Marshall University and a Huntington City Council member, is the guest speaker.
The position is currently occupied by ...
www.herald-dispatch.com, 17 April 2008 [cached]
The position is currently occupied by Sandra Clements, who is coordinator of disability services at Marshall University.City Council members appointed Clements in October after Brandi Jones vacated the seat to become Mayor David Felinton's administration and finance director.
...
Clements will face Osagie Ayanru, a part-time employee at the A.D. Lewis Community Center; Jeremiah Jasper, pastor of United Methodist Church; and John Vance, a retired chemical production worker.
...
Clements, 58, said her activism and dedication to several ongoing efforts in District 5 won her the appointment from her fellow council members last year and should win over voters in the May 13 primary.She also said she would be accessible to her constituents.
"I have been very active in my district.That experience gives you an idea on how to manage budgets and work together for a common cause," she said.
Clements says abandoned housing is one of the most pressing issues in the district.However, the problem won't go away until the area's economy improves and crime rates diminish, she said.
Nonetheless, the city should still form partnerships with Habitat for Humanity and other community agencies to forge ahead on large-scale residential development projects such as the one on Artisan Avenue, she said.
The Artisan Avenue redevelopment project is one of the success stories of District 5 along with church renovation projects and the construction of a senior citizens center, Clements said.Building on those successful projects is key to the district's revitalization, she said.
Ayanru, 55, is a native of Nigeria who came to the United States in 1971.He obtained a bachelor's and master's degree in journalism from West Virginia University.He lived in Charleston for 14 years before moving to Huntington three years ago.
Ayanru said he possesses strong communication skills that can bring a level of understanding to any issue and build consensus among fragmented parties.
"When I moved here, I noticed there was a disconnect between the people who live in my district and the city," he said."There's a sense of disillusionment that what people say doesn't matter, and they can't make a difference in how the city is run.I can change those beliefs."
Ayanru agrees with Clements that the city should form partnerships with Habitat for Humanity to revitalize the housing stock.Doing so would provide more affordable housing for single mothers and their children, he said.
On a citywide level, basic services such as street paving and public safety need to be improved, he said.Ayanru's idea for accomplishing that involves giving city employees raises but letting them fend for themselves on health insurance.The change would lessen the city's financial commitment but still allow employees to have health insurance, he said.
Battling the invisible: Once only for war veterans, MU program now helps any disability
www.hdonline.com, 30 July 2006 [cached]
"There's been an explosion of learning disabilities in the past few years," said Sandra Clements, coordinator of Marshall's DSS."Now our challenge is to meet the needs of students with these invisible disabilities and the perception that our office only provides services for the physically disabled."
Clements recently attended a conference in San Diego to train DSS workers who face this misperception daily.
"There are students with Attention Deficit Disorder, learning disabilities, psychological disabilities and social adjustment disabilities who we can serve.I want to find a more universal symbol than the wheelchair logo for our office so that these kinds of students can see that we're there to help them as well."
In years past, students who misbehaved in class or couldn't keep up with the material were considered "slow" or "unruly".Clements said that in the 1970s and 1980s the identification of different learning disorders helped to identify students who might otherwise fall through cracks in the system.
"Learning disabilities have always been there," Clements said."We just didn't have a handle on it then."
Today, there are different ways to assist these students.
"There are students who learn differently," Clements said."Let's say there's a student who can't function in a classroom setting or only functions best at 4 a.m.The solution for that student might be an online class.If a student has trouble reading, we can read to them or enlarge the print.We're not saying every student who enrolls in college is a 'college-made' student, but for those who are willing to obtain the assistance they need, we can help."
Clements has been with Marshall's DSS since 1990, and during that decade she saw the sudden surge in students with leaning disorders on campus.Clements said that modern technology has enabled many students to get out of their wheelchairs and on their feet again.
"You don't see as many chair users anymore," Clements said."The largest numbers of students with disabilities are those with learning disabilities or psychological disorders."
According to Clements, the theme of the San Diego conference was "access"-finding solutions for the challenges these students face.During Student Orientation, Clements tries to emphasize what the DSS office can do.
"We try to help them understand what a disability is," Clements said."They get so much information at Orientation that it may pass right by them if we don't stop to let them know that perhaps our office can serve them."
That is Clements' and the Marshall DSS office's current challenge, to reach students who may not realize that they have a disability and to let them know that the definition of disability goes beyond the physical.
...
"There's been an explosion of learning disabilities in the past few years," said Sandra Clements, coordinator of Marshall's DSS."Now our challenge is to meet the needs of students with these invisible disabilities and the perception that our office only provides services for the physically disabled."
Clements recently attended a conference in San Diego to train DSS workers who face this misperception daily.
"There are students with Attention Deficit Disorder, learning disabilities, psychological disabilities and social adjustment disabilities who we can serve.I want to find a more universal symbol than the wheelchair logo for our office so that these kinds of students can see that we're there to help them as well."
In years past, students who misbehaved in class or couldn't keep up with the material were considered "slow" or "unruly".Clements said that in the 1970s and 1980s the identification of different learning disorders helped to identify students who might otherwise fall through cracks in the system.
"Learning disabilities have always been there," Clements said."We just didn't have a handle on it then."
Today, there are different ways to assist these students.
"There are students who learn differently," Clements said."Let's say there's a student who can't function in a classroom setting or only functions best at 4 a.m.The solution for that student might be an online class.If a student has trouble reading, we can read to them or enlarge the print.We're not saying every student who enrolls in college is a 'college-made' student, but for those who are willing to obtain the assistance they need, we can help."
Clements has been with Marshall's DSS since 1990, and during that decade she saw the sudden surge in students with leaning disorders on campus.Clements said that modern technology has enabled many students to get out of their wheelchairs and on their feet again.
"You don't see as many chair users anymore," Clements said."The largest numbers of students with disabilities are those with learning disabilities or psychological disorders."
According to Clements, the theme of the San Diego conference was "access"-finding solutions for the challenges these students face.During Student Orientation, Clements tries to emphasize what the DSS office can do.
"We try to help them understand what a disability is," Clements said."They get so much information at Orientation that it may pass right by them if we don't stop to let them know that perhaps our office can serve them."
That is Clements' and the Marshall DSS office's current challenge, to reach students who may not realize that they have a disability and to let them know that the definition of disability goes beyond the physical.
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Sandra M. Clements, 1821 9th ...
www.herald-dispatch.com, 15 Oct 2007 [cached]
Sandra M. Clements, 1821 9th Ave. Clements is coordinator of Disabled Student Services at Marshall University.
MU Recruiting Bulletin 4, 01/26/01
www.marshall.edu, 7 Sept 2001 [cached]
Send letter of application, resume and 3 references to: Sandra Clements, Student Development, Marshall University, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755.Application deadline: September 14, 2001.
Search No. MURC046.Animal Research Technician.Full-time position.Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and experience.Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in Biology, Biochemistry, or related biomedical field; strong interest in learning new laboratory techniques is essential; ability to successfully handle research rodents is required.Duties: Recovery surgery on rats; electrode and arterial cannula implantation; miniosmotic pump preparation and implantation; blood sampling; rat maintenance; sleep deprivation experiments; electrophysiological recording of rodent sleep pattern; data collection, analysis and computer entry; rat brain tissue preparation for histological analysis and LTP recording; water maze experiments; electrode and cannula preparation, cage cleaning, and ordering laboratory supplies.
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