Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 9/30/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Samuel Strober

Wrong Dr. Samuel Strober?

Professor of Medicine

Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford University
450 Via Palou
Stanford , California 94305
United States

Company Description: The Stanford Technology Ventures Program is dedicated to accelerating high-technology entrepreneurship education and creating scholarly research on technology-based...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • M.D.
  • B.A.
    Columbia University
58 Total References
Web References
La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology | Board of Directors
www.liai.org, 30 Sept 2013 [cached]
SAMUEL STROBER, M.D. Professor of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology Stanford University School of Medicine
Dr. Strober has served as Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, since 1982. He held the position of Chief of that Division from 1978 to 1997, having first arrived at the School of Medicine as a Senior Assistant Resident in 1970. He has been President of the Clinical Immunology Society, and is a founder of two biotechnology companies (Dendreon, Inc. and Innate Immune, Inc.)
Dr. Strober's laboratory research and clinical trials have focused on the immune cell interactions that prevent graft versus host disease and retain graft anti-tumor activity after bone marrow transplantation, as well as cell interactions that prevent rejection of organ transplants in the absence of immunosuppressive drugs. He is also interested in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, a disease in which the immune system causes excessive inflammation leading to the damage of multiple organs. Throughout his career, Dr. Strober has published over 300 peer-reviewed articles in scientific journals, and has served on editorial boards of immunology journals. He received the Leon Reznick Memorial Prize from the Harvard Medical School.
Dr. Strober received his B.A. from Columbia University and his M.D. from Harvard University. He completed fellowships in the Surgical Research Laboratory at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, and in the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology in Oxford University followed by an internship in medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Prior to joining Stanford, Dr. Strober completed additional postdoctoral training as a Research Associate in the Laboratory of Cell Biology of the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda.
Hepatitis and Health news and miscellaneous communications hepatitis-news-0802
www.dreampharm.com, 1 Aug 2003 [cached]
Even with immunosuppression, half of kidneys from living or cadaveric donors will be rejected within 10 to 12 years, said Samuel Strober, a Stanford University professor and transplant pioneer.
Strober and colleagues were able to wean two of four kidney transplant recipients off immunosuppressives within a year of undergoing their experimental protocol.The recipients were given both stem cells and a kidney from the same donor.
...
Even with immunosuppression, half of kidneys from living or cadaveric donors will be rejected within 10 to 12 years, said Samuel Strober, a Stanford University professor and transplant pioneer.
Strober and colleagues were able to wean two of four kidney transplant recipients off immunosuppressives within a year of undergoing their experimental protocol.The recipients were given both stem cells and a kidney from the same donor.
...
According to Dr. Samuel Strober, professor of immunology and rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine, the protocol resulted in chimerism -- the coexistence of donor and recipient cells -- in three of the four patients for a period of two to three months, and in two, tests determined their immune systems were indifferent to the donor organ.Weaning of all immunosuppressive drugs had been completed by 12 months in these two patients, but after being off the drugs for about five months, researchers noted signs of rejection, which in both cases was treated successfully, and the patients were returned to low doses of anti-rejection drugs.One patient is near to complete drug withdrawal and the fourth was never weaned due to an early rejection.
Importantly, added Dr. Strober, the donor stem-cell infusions did not cause the potentially life-threatening complication of graft versus host disease, whereby donor cells attack the recipient's tissues, in any of the patients.
La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology | Scientific Advisory Board
www.liai.org, 6 Sept 2011 [cached]
SAMUEL STROBER, M.D. Professor of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine
Dr. Strober has served as Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, since 1982. He held the position of Chief of that Division from 1978 to 1997, having first arrived at the School of Medicine as a Senior Assistant Resident in 1970. He has been President of the Clinical Immunology Society, and is a founder of two biotechnology companies (Dendreon, Inc. and Innate Immune, Inc.).
Dr. Strober's laboratory research and clinical trials have focused on the immune cell interactions that prevent graft versus host disease and retain graft anti-tumor activity after bone marrow transplantation, as well as cell interactions that prevent rejection of organ transplants in the absence of immunosuppressive drugs. He is also interested in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, a disease in which the immune system causes excessive inflammation leading to the damage of multiple organs. Throughout his career, Dr. Strober has published over 300 peer-reviewed articles in scientific journals, and has served on editorial boards of immunology journals. He received the Leon Reznick Memorial Prize from the Harvard Medical School.
Dr. Strober received his B.A. from Columbia University and his M.D. from Harvard University. He completed fellowships in the Surgical Research Laboratory at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, and in the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology in Oxford University followed by an internship in medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Prior to joining Stanford, Dr. Strober completed additional postdoctoral training as a Research Associate in the Laboratory of Cell Biology of the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda.
La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology | News Releases
www.liai.org, 12 Dec 2007 [cached]
"Kimi inspired people by his intellectual capacity, but also by his personal capacity," said Samuel Strober, M.D., Chairman of the LIAI Board of Directors.
1998 Board of Directors/Scientific Advisory Board
internal.liai.org, 15 June 2001 [cached]
Samuel Strober , M.DHoward Hughes Medical Institute
Professor of Medicine and ChiefBeckman Center for
Division of Immunology and RheumatologyMolecular and Genetic Medicine
Stanford University School of MedicineStanford University
Stanford , CaliforniaSchool of Medicine
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304