Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 4/29/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Samuel Penhallow?

Samuel Penhallow

Chief Justice

Superior Court

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Superior Court

Find other employees at this company (8,639)

Background Information

Employment History

Highly Respected Local Magistrate and Deacon

North Church


Affiliations

The Province

Governor


Indian Wars

Historian


Provincial Council

Member


King

Councilor


Royal Council

Influential Member


Web References(25 Total References)


Portsmouth Athenaeum Finding Aids

portsmouthathenaeum.org [cached]

Folder 3 1702-1705 Samuel Penhallow (Treasurer) to Selectmen and Assessors re:
sums to be raised by taxes from Portsmouth (4 documents). The sum increases from 500 pounds in 1702 to 800 in 1705. Indicates rates on commodities, including red oak, white oak, and pine boards. Folder 13 1802-1821 "Collections Account Book" kept by Samuel Penhallow Merchant accounts, 1791- 1794; possibly kept by Samuel Penhallow. Folder 23 1811-1815 Account Book 1828 Mar 3: No. 5 for Mrs. Penhallow's seat In 1755, Samuel Penhallow began his tenure as clerk, a position he held for about fifty years. (His bound soft cover notebook includes duplicates of the Minutes, in large part.) Occasionally a committee was formed to carry out a task or follow up on business. Their reports may be recorded on the same page as the minutes. Folder 25 1755-1759 Notices and Meetings, Samuel Penhallow's keeps his first Minutes Signed by prominent members, including William Whipple, Joseph Whipple and Samuel Penhallow.


Portsmouth Athenaeum Finding Aids

www.portsmouthathenaeum.org [cached]

The primary figures, Archibald Macphaedris, Jonathan Warner, and Samuel Penhallow were all prominent merchants.
There are a few papers involving Samuel Penhallow as Justice of the Peace. Subjects include the family's shipping business, sawmills, relatives in Londonderry, Northern Ireland and the procurement of Irish workers for the Macpheadris plantation in Casco, Me., extensive land holdings, involving lands originally granted to Capt. John Mason (considered the father of New Hampshire), and Samuel Penhallow's activities as justice of the peace. Persons represented include Archibald Macpheadris, his daughter, Mary (Macpheadris) Osborne Warner, her husband, Jonathan Warner, Elizabeth Warner Sherburne, John N. Sherburne, Samuel Penhallow, Pearce Wentworth Penhallow, Hunking Penhallow, Richard Wibird, Gerard Caseaux, French consul at Portsmouth (1803), and his wife, Sarah Caseaux. The Penhallow Family Papers series (1716-1790) are mostly the papers of Samuel Penhallow in London to his parents (1789) on trying to reestablish trade with Britain. There are a few Justice of the Peace papers; one examination by Samuel Penhallow of a ship's crew abandoning a passenger and selling his merchandise. In 1779, Jonathan Warner was appointed the guardian of two daughters, Elizabeth and Abigail, of his deceased brother Samuel. Pearce Penhallow was a descendant from Samuel Penhallow (1665-1726) who migrated from England to the Massaschusetts Bay Colony to Portsmouth. Samuel married Mary Cutt, the daughter of John Cutt, a prominent land owner and president of the provincial council. Samuel was merchant, provincial council member, served as a judge and magistrate, and became the Chief Justice of the Superior Court. 1813 Samuel Penhallow died. Samuel Penhallow to Moses Cavorly. Examination of the crew by Samuel Penhallow, Justice of the Peace. Samuel Penhallow to Rev. Eleazar Wheelock. Samuel Penhallow, Justice of the Peace, to Keeper of the Gaol. Samuel Penhallow, London, to his parents (John Penhallow). Samuel and John Penhallow to Rockingham County. Obituary: Samuel Penhallow "who died on Thursday last…Aged ninety-three…" 6.3 Letter, 1805. Ebenezer Webster to Samuel Penhallow. Salisbury. Lot of land in Salisbury. 6.4 Ca. 1790. Index sheet. Headed "Samuel Penhallow". [Goes with index pages in 6.1?] Deed: Thomas Harvey of Portsmouth to Richard Wibird of Portsmouth, a lot of land on Graffords Lane in Portsmouth. (recorded by Samuel Penhallow).


The Scotch-Irish in the Indian Wars

www.libraryireland.com [cached]

Samuel Penhallow was a native of Cornwall, England, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1686 originally with a view of becoming a missionary to the Indians.
He married a wealthy heiress, by whom he acquired property at Portsmouth, N. H., where he settled. He was appointed a member of the Provincial Council, was Treasurer of the Province for several years, and for many years before his death in 1726 he was Chief Justice of the Superior Court. His History was published in 1726 with an introduction by the Rev. Dr. Benjamin Colman, of Boston, who likened the experience of the New England settlers with the Indians to that of the children of Israel with the Canaanites. Judge Penhallow's History is a document of the highest value, as it is a first-hand record of events. He gives a detailed account of massacres committed on both sides along the border, whither Scotch-Irish immigration to New England was directed. His account shows that all the provincial authorities did ordinarily was to incite reprisals upon the Indians. Referring to the year 1706 he says: In 1706 Penhallow estimated that every Indian killed or taken "cost the country at least a thousand pounds.


Townsend, MA > History of Townsend Harbor

townsend.bicnet.net [cached]

The authors of the town histories mention Indians only as passing through the territory or being docile, but the account of Samuel Penhallow from 1703 to 1723 gives a much different view, with settlers being taken captive, tortured and burned at the stake by blood thirsty savages.Samuel Penhallow was born in St. Mabon, Cornwall, England in 1665.He came to New England in 1686 to continue his studies at Harvard College in preparation for missionary labors, but political troubles about that time are alleged to have caused his discouragement, He moved to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where he began a prosperous career in business and political life.He accumulated what in those times would be described as a great estate.In 1699, he was elected the Speaker of the House which he held for three years.He was an influential member of the Royal Council, holding concurrently the offices of Treasurer of the Province and of Recorder of Deeds.At the time of the Indian wars,, he was Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which he held until his death in 1726.Penhallow was an influential man and, because of his position in the community, he took part in the ratification of the treaties with the Indians.He was as qualified as any in the colonial community to chronicle the relations between the aggressive colonists and the restless Indians.His account of this bloody and tragic relationship during the period from 1703 to the ratified peace treaties of 1723 is considered an important and generally reliable source of information of this colonial period in American history.The inhabitants had been through all of the Indian Wars referred to in Penhallow.


Portsmouth Athenaeum Finding Aids

www.portsmouthathenaeum.org [cached]

Folder 3 1702-1705 Samuel Penhallow (Treasurer) to Selectmen and Assessors re:
sums to be raised by taxes from Portsmouth (4 documents). The sum increases from 500 pounds in 1702 to 800 in 1705. Indicates rates on commodities, including red oak, white oak, and pine boards. Folder 13 1802-1821 "Collections Account Book" kept by Samuel Penhallow Merchant accounts, 1791- 1794; possibly kept by Samuel Penhallow. Folder 23 1811-1815 Account Book 1828 Mar 3: No. 5 for Mrs. Penhallow's seat In 1755, Samuel Penhallow began his tenure as clerk, a position he held for about fifty years. (His bound soft cover notebook includes duplicates of the Minutes, in large part.) Occasionally a committee was formed to carry out a task or follow up on business. Their reports may be recorded on the same page as the minutes. Folder 25 1755-1759 Notices and Meetings, Samuel Penhallow's keeps his first Minutes Signed by prominent members, including William Whipple, Joseph Whipple and Samuel Penhallow. 1757 John Ayers, Thomas Wibird, Thomas Pierce, Daniel Rogers, John Sherburne, Samuel Penhallow, and Samuel Sherburne (Committee of the North Church) with additional comments by Samuel Langdon responding to complaints against the North Church, alleging violations of the Cambridge Platform brought about by Joseph Cotton, Susannah Cotton, and Hannah Elliot. 1787, Nov. 27 Samuel Langdon to Samuel Penhallow, collection of rent from Vere Royse for Langdon's house in Portsmouth, Langdon requests that the rent due be paid to the North Church 1777, Feb. 14 Samuel Penhallow to Ezra Stiles, requesting that Stiles accept the position in Portsmouth for one year 1777, April 20 Samuel Penhallow to Ezra Stiles, regarding accommodations being prepared for him in Portsmouth, including household goods 1778, May 10 Ezra Stiles, Samuel Penhallow, and William Parker (First Church in Portsmouth) to the First Church of Christ in Boston 1778, May 23 Samuel Penhallow to Joseph Buckminster, announcement of Ezra Stiles decision to leave the position as pastor in Portsmouth and the need for the church to fill the position 1778, June 15 Joseph Buckminster to Samuel Penhallow, regarding his consideration of the offer of the position of pastor in Portsmouth 1778, June 22 Samuel Penhallow to Joseph Buckminster, request that Buckminster come to Portsmouth following the corporation of Yale College 1778, July 27 Joseph Buckminster to Samuel Penhallow, regarding his continued consideration of the offer of the position of pastor in Portsmouth 1778, Aug. 3 Samuel Penhallow to Joseph Buckminster, discussion of his decision to decline the position at Hartford and offering him the position of pastor in Portsmouth 1780, May 1 To the Committee of the first Church of Christ in Portsmouth from Samuel Penhallow, Samuel Cutts, John Penhallow, report regarding members who had been absent, including Doctor Daniel Rogers who had views contrary to church practice concerning the baptism of children of non-members, the church's lack of a settled pastor, and an offense committed by Samuel Penhallow. 1780, May 1 To the Committee of the first Church of Christ in Portsmouth from Samuel Penhallow, Samuel Cutts, John Penhallow, report regarding members who had been absent, including Doctor Daniel Rogers who had views contrary to church practice concerning the baptism of children of non-members, the church's lack of a settled pastor, and an offense committed by Samuel Penhallow. 1787, Feb. 7 John Sherburne, Samuel Penhallow, and William Brewster to the Overseer of the Poor, regarding the Town's request for reimbursement for expenses from the church, the church responds with a list of items already given to the town including, "…the Parish gave the Town the Ground for the Negro Burying Ground"


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory