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Wrong Sam Marranca?

Sam Marranca

Owner

Cafe Italia

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Cafe Italia

Background Information

Employment History

Owner

The Citizens' Voice

Owner

Caf Italia

Web References (6 Total References)


In 2012, Sam Marranca, owner ...

www.timesleader.com [cached]

In 2012, Sam Marranca, owner of Cafe Italia on River Road, won best marinara sauce. "It's an old family recipe," Marranca said of his award-winning sauce.


Sam Marranca, owner of ...

www.timesleader.com [cached]

Sam Marranca, owner of Cafe Italia in Jenkins Township, second from left, receives the Sauce Wars trophy at the Pittston Tomato Festival on Sunday night. From left: Jenna Gupko of the Greater Pittston YMCA, Marranca, 2012 Festival Queen Marina Maida, and YMCA Executive Director Craig Lukatch.

...
"It's an old family recipe," Marranca said.
Tomatoes are in it but good luck getting the other ingredients from him.
"It's not for sale," he said.
Marranca, 61, was surprised to get the call telling him he won. He was lying down at home after coming back from the Make a Difference for the Kids Car Show at the Pittston Commons shopping center, where his 1947 Lincoln Continental convertible was named "Best of Show."


Sam Marranca, owner of ...

citizensvoice.com [cached]

Sam Marranca, owner of Cafe Italia, holds a plate of fresh vegetables.

Sam Marranca wasn't about to let muddy floodwater ruin the restaurant he worked so hard to create.
The owner of Cafe Italia in Pittston could have called it quits, but he knew he had a good thing going at the Italian restaurant. When the Susquehanna River overflowed its banks in September, the restaurant had been open less than a year.
Rising floodwaters forced Marranca to evacuate the building on River Road, leaving behind equipment, furniture and products. All were destroyed by the six feet of water that made it into the building.
"I lost everything. I had to redo it all," he said.
Marranca felt he owed it to his loyal customers to come back better than before. He took time during the repair process to make several improvements to the restaurant, giving it a more upscale feel with more room for patrons. The restaurant reopened after 54 days of hard work.
"I dressed it up a little bit," Marranca said, pointing out the new hardwood floors and expanded dining areas. "That 54 days took a lot out of my life."
Several glass wine bottles, nestled in wicker bases along a dining room ledge, somehow escaped destruction, even when coolers and freezers were flipped over from the floodwater, Marranca said. So he chose to save them, and set them out again after giving them a good scrub and filling them with colored liquid.
Cafe Italia is Marranca's first dining establishment. He chose to open the restaurant because he loves food and knows quite a bit about Italian cuisine due to his Sicilian heritage, he said. He was born in raised in Pittston, an area rich with Italian heritage.
One of the restaurant's big draws is Marranca's commitment to using fresh ingredients for all his dishes, he said. He also imports items from Italy like espresso, served in cups from the same country.
"I never bought frozen chicken or fish in the restaurant," he said. "You'll taste the difference. You use quality, you're going to taste it."
Appetizers like fried calamari and shrimp scampi are always popular, Marranca said, as well as the fresh soups, including a seafood bisque that he makes himself.
"It's the only soup I make, and they rave about it," he said.
For the main course, there's Veal Milanese, a sauteed veal cutlet served with tomatoes, black olives, mozzarella and fresh garlic; or seafood fra diavolo, a medley of lobster, clams, mussels, and calamari in a spicy red sauce. Any dish made with vodka sauce is also a hit, Marranca said.
"People will get that on the side," he said.


Sam Marranca, owner of ...

citizensvoice.com [cached]

Sam Marranca, owner of Cafe Italia, holds a plate of fresh vegetables.

Sam Marranca wasn't about to let muddy floodwater ruin the restaurant he worked so hard to create.
The owner of Cafe Italia in Pittston could have called it quits, but he knew he had a good thing going at the Italian restaurant. When the Susquehanna River overflowed its banks in September, the restaurant had been open less than a year.
Rising floodwaters forced Marranca to evacuate the building on River Road, leaving behind equipment, furniture and products. All were destroyed by the six feet of water that made it into the building.
"I lost everything. I had to redo it all," he said.
Marranca felt he owed it to his loyal customers to come back better than before. He took time during the repair process to make several improvements to the restaurant, giving it a more upscale feel with more room for patrons. The restaurant reopened after 54 days of hard work.
"I dressed it up a little bit," Marranca said, pointing out the new hardwood floors and expanded dining areas. "That 54 days took a lot out of my life."
Several glass wine bottles, nestled in wicker bases along a dining room ledge, somehow escaped destruction, even when coolers and freezers were flipped over from the floodwater, Marranca said. So he chose to save them, and set them out again after giving them a good scrub and filling them with colored liquid.
Cafe Italia is Marranca's first dining establishment. He chose to open the restaurant because he loves food and knows quite a bit about Italian cuisine due to his Sicilian heritage, he said. He was born in raised in Pittston, an area rich with Italian heritage.
One of the restaurant's big draws is Marranca's commitment to using fresh ingredients for all his dishes, he said. He also imports items from Italy like espresso, served in cups from the same country.
"I never bought frozen chicken or fish in the restaurant," he said. "You'll taste the difference. You use quality, you're going to taste it."
Appetizers like fried calamari and shrimp scampi are always popular, Marranca said, as well as the fresh soups, including a seafood bisque that he makes himself.
"It's the only soup I make, and they rave about it," he said.
For the main course, there's Veal Milanese, a sauteed veal cutlet served with tomatoes, black olives, mozzarella and fresh garlic; or seafood fra diavolo, a medley of lobster, clams, mussels, and calamari in a spicy red sauce. Any dish made with vodka sauce is also a hit, Marranca said.
"People will get that on the side," he said.


Sam Marranca, owner of ...

citizensvoice.com [cached]

Sam Marranca, owner of Cafe Italia, holds a plate of fresh vegetables.

Sam Marranca wasn't about to let muddy floodwater ruin the restaurant he worked so hard to create.
The owner of Cafe Italia in Pittston could have called it quits, but he knew he had a good thing going at the Italian restaurant. When the Susquehanna River overflowed its banks in September, the restaurant had been open less than a year.
Rising floodwaters forced Marranca to evacuate the building on River Road, leaving behind equipment, furniture and products. All were destroyed by the six feet of water that made it into the building.
"I lost everything. I had to redo it all," he said.
Marranca felt he owed it to his loyal customers to come back better than before. He took time during the repair process to make several improvements to the restaurant, giving it a more upscale feel with more room for patrons. The restaurant reopened after 54 days of hard work.
"I dressed it up a little bit," Marranca said, pointing out the new hardwood floors and expanded dining areas. "That 54 days took a lot out of my life."
Several glass wine bottles, nestled in wicker bases along a dining room ledge, somehow escaped destruction, even when coolers and freezers were flipped over from the floodwater, Marranca said. So he chose to save them, and set them out again after giving them a good scrub and filling them with colored liquid.
Cafe Italia is Marranca's first dining establishment. He chose to open the restaurant because he loves food and knows quite a bit about Italian cuisine due to his Sicilian heritage, he said. He was born in raised in Pittston, an area rich with Italian heritage.
One of the restaurant's big draws is Marranca's commitment to using fresh ingredients for all his dishes, he said. He also imports items from Italy like espresso, served in cups from the same country.
"I never bought frozen chicken or fish in the restaurant," he said. "You'll taste the difference. You use quality, you're going to taste it."
Appetizers like fried calamari and shrimp scampi are always popular, Marranca said, as well as the fresh soups, including a seafood bisque that he makes himself.
"It's the only soup I make, and they rave about it," he said.
For the main course, there's Veal Milanese, a sauteed veal cutlet served with tomatoes, black olives, mozzarella and fresh garlic; or seafood fra diavolo, a medley of lobster, clams, mussels, and calamari in a spicy red sauce. Any dish made with vodka sauce is also a hit, Marranca said.
"People will get that on the side," he said.

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