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Wrong Sabina Gesell?

Sabina B. Gesell

Assistant Professor

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine

HQ Phone:  (336) 713-7700

Direct Phone: (336) ***-****direct phone

Email: s***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine

391 Technology Way \

Winston-Salem, North Carolina,27101

United States

Company Description

The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine is dedicated to the discovery, development and clinical translation of regenerative medicine technologies. The institute has used biomaterials alone, cell therapies, and engineered tissues and organs for the ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Assistant Professor of Social Sciences and Health Policy

Wake Forest University


Senior Research Associate

Press Ganey Associates Inc


Research Assistant Professor In Pediatrics

Vanderbilt University


Web References(42 Total References)


Patients Can Now Confidentially Rate Hospitals on a Mobile App | Curate.Health

www.curatehealth.me [cached]

Joining Mr. Clark and Mr. Andrews on SmartPatient's leadership team is Sabina Gesell, PhD, a faculty member of Wake Forest and Vanderbilt University's Schools of Medicine as SmartPatient's psychometrician and lead investigator.


Friendships influence kids` activity levels | Foot.com

foot.com [cached]

"We tend to think of teenagers as being very influential amongst their peers, but now we'reseeing this in a younger age group as well," said study author Sabina Gesell, assistant professor of Pediatrics at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.
Read the full articlehere.


National Collaborative for Childhood Obesity Research | " The upside of peer pressure: social networks help kids exercise more

www.nccor.org [cached]

That's what researchers led by Sabina Gesell, a research assistant professor in pediatrics at the Vanderbilt School of Medicine, and her colleagues are reporting in the journal Pediatrics.
"We see evidence that the children are mirroring, emulating or adjusting to be similar to their friends," says Gesell. Gesell says the results could help in providing a much needed new tool for confronting the obesity epidemic. Gesell is eager to conduct the next phase of studies, which would break down exactly how large an influence a single active child can have on the behavior of his more sedentary classmates. Hers is not the first study to analyze the "contagion" effect of social networks. Previous studies have documented how a person's social network can influence everything from his likelihood of gaining weight or quitting smoking to levels of loneliness and happiness. However, Gesell is the first to study the phenomenon in children. "This is a novel approach to obesity prevention," says Gesell.


The Scrubs Report | Nashville Health News - Archives 2

www.scrubsreport.com [cached]

In fact, a group of four to five peers has a significant influence on any individual child regardless of their usual activity level," Gesell said.
The results showed more active groups tended to draw a child into greater activity levels, while groups that gravitated toward sedentary activities brought an individual child's levels down.  "The average activity level of the group is what influences an individual child. Children are constantly adjusting their activity levels to match the peer group," Gesell said. The researchers also examined whether children preferentially select groups based on activity level, perhaps choosing peers whose levels were similar to their own, but surprisingly, they found no such association. Children might choose friends with other similarities, but activity levels did not seem to be a factor. Gesell said this is exciting because after-care programs are under increasing pressure to get children to be more active. Adjusting the makeup of playgroups to place children at risk for obesity into groups with an activity level that is higher than their own is likely to influence them to be more active too. "If you look at childhood obesity efforts across the country, many have failed to look at social context. It is important that we look at all the forces in play and streamline our efforts to have a maximal impact," Gesell said. Vanderbilt's Sabina Gesell, Ph.D., research assistant professor of Pediatrics, is first author of a study published in the online version of the journal Pediatrics that examines the group effect of peers on activity levels of children in after-school programs.


NCCOR National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research

nccor.org [cached]

Sabina Gesell, Ph.D., research assistant professor of Pediatrics, will build and measure new social networks of families enrolled in the study and examine the impact.


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