Ron Turco, Member, Faculty Department of Agronomy, Purdue University
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This profile was last updated on 8/20/14 and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.
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Member, Faculty Department of Agr...

Phone: (765) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: r***@***.edu
Local Address: West Lafayettee, Indiana, United States
Purdue University
P.O. Box null
West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
United States

Company Description: Purdue's College of Engineering is made up of 12 academic programs: aeronautics and astronautics, agricultural and biological, biomedical, chemical, civil,...   more
Background

Employment History

  • Director
    IWRRC
  • Founding Director
    Purdue Environmental Sciences and Engineering Institute

Education

  • Ph.D. , Soil Microbiology
    Washington State University
  • B.S. degrees , Soils and Microbiology
    University of Idaho
144 Total References
Web References
IWRRC: Indiana Water Resources Research Center
www.iwrrc.org, 4 April 2014 [cached]
Ronald Turco, Ph.D. Director E-mail: rturco@purdue.edu (v)765.494.8077 (f)765.496.2926
“This system has allowed us to ...
www.sdearthtimes.com, 23 Feb 2011 [cached]
“This system has allowed us to integrate golf aesthetics with the protection of natural wetland systems,” said Ron Turco, soil microbiologist and director of the Purdue Environmental Sciences and Engineering Institute. “Although we knew that both wetlands and golf courses can improve the quality of runoff water, studying how they work together will help us incorporate constructed wetlands into existing settings and to optimize their use.”
Design of the wetlands is important in maintaining plant life and microbes that remove chemicals from the water, Turco said.
Conferences MST
www.epi-net.org, 9 July 2013 [cached]
Ronald F. Turco
Ronald F. Turco, Jr. earned two B.S. degrees from the University of Idaho; the first is in Soil Science (1979) and his second is in Microbiology (1980). He received his Ph.D. in Soil Microbiology from Washington State University in 1985. Dr. Turco joined the faculty of Purdue University in 1985 and is currently a Professor in the College of Agriculture. Dr. Turco is the Director of the Environmental Pathogens Information Network (EPI-Net.org) and the Director of the Indiana Water Resource Research Center (IWRRC.org).
Dr. Turco works with a number of research programs across the Purdue Campus and the country. He collaborates with faculty in Purdue's Colleges of Engineering and Science as well as working with the Purdue Climate Change Research Center and the Center for the Environment. Dr. Turco's research program is divided into three major areas of investigation: The Environmental Fate of Pathogens, The Environmental Fate of Organic Chemicals and the use of Biological Processes to Produce Fuel. Currently work in his laboratory is addressing the role of dissolved organic carbon in surface water in supporting the survival of E. coli and the potential of waterborne E. coli and Salmonella to colonize and survive on vegetable surfaces. Dr. Turco used his interest in pathogens to underpin the formation of EPI-Net.org a major resource on the impact of pathogens in the environment. Other work involves the environmental impact of fullerenes (C60) and signal wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) on soil processes; this work is also addressing the environmental fate of more traditional organic chemicals such as pesticides. Dr. Turco's has recently initiated a project looking at the potential to use food and agricultural waste to produce CH4 and possibly methanol. As the Water Center Director, Dr. Turco is also working on a project to address the revitalization of the Wabash River corridor by proving expertise that will help minimize the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria. Dr. Turco teaches classes on Soil Ecology, Soil Microbiology and The Environmental Fates of Organics.
Over the 20 years he has been at Purdue University, Dr. Turco has been collaborator or lead PI on projects that have resulted in some $8 million dollars in competitive grant funds. Most recently he has been the lead PI on nanomaterials projects supported by NSF and EPA, EPI-net and a food safety effort supported by USDA and new USDA-CEAP project addressing water issues in Eagle Creek Reservoir near Indianapolis. He has served on numerous review panels for federal and private funding agencies.
Ronald F. Turco, Jr. Professor, Laboratory for Soil Microbiology College of Agriculture Purdue University 915 W. State Street West Lafayette, IN 47907
Phone: (765)494-8077 Fax: (765) 496-2926
Ron Turco, Purdue ...
www.2013yearoftheriver.com, 28 July 2013 [cached]
Ron Turco, Purdue University professor and director of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center, explained how far and fast the river travels. When asked the time it would take a drop of water at the Wabash headwaters in Fort Recovery to reach the confluence with the Ohio River, Turco came up with a calculation, but clarified a few conditions. The river flows faster above Logansport, and slower below it. Also, the river's volume (or discharge) and its velocity (or miles per hour) are two different measures. And, the depth and width of the Wabash varies widely, affecting its velocity. The weather also affects the speed.
Realizing those disclaimers, Turco estimated that something entering the Wabash in Ohio would travel about 12 days before spilling into the Ohio River.
That trip covers 474.7 miles. (Turco helped clarify that distance, as well. Various sources list the Wabash's length differently, from 503 miles to 487, 475 and 474. Turco considers 474.7 miles, or 764 kilometers - the total mentioned in the book, "The Wabash River Ecosystem," by Jim Gammon - to be the definitive number.)
Purdue professor of agronomy Ron ...
www.daytondailynews.com, 30 May 2014 [cached]
Purdue professor of agronomy Ron Turco calls the report "a wake-up call for Indiana" because it shows how important it is to protect the state's water resources due to the number of Hoosier jobs tied to water.
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