Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

Last Update

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Ron Thresher?

Ron Thresher

Fisheries Biologist

Commonwealth Scientific

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Commonwealth Scientific

Find other employees at this company (115)

Background Information

Employment History

Abstract/poster


Member, Division of Marine Research

Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization


Affiliate

CSIRO


Affiliations

The Crimp Company

Advisors


Fisheries Research and Development Corporation

Board Member


Education

Ph.D.

fish behavior and ecology

University of Miami


Web References(75 Total References)


www.divethoughts.com

According to Ron Thresher of the Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) they were looking for life deeper than any other voyage in Australian waters.
He went on to say that "Our sampling documented the deepest known Australian fauna, including a bizarre carnivorous sea squirt, sea spiders and giant sponges, and previously unknown marine communities dominated by gooseneck barnacles and millions of round, purple-spotted sea anemones,".


www.csiro.com

CSIRO's Dr Ron Thresher with deep-ocean corals used in the study to assess growth rates in fish species.


www.readinesshub.com

"There's no question that the shallow-water fish are tracking our local version of global climate warming," said Tasmania, Australia-based Ronald Thresher, a fisheries biologist with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization.
The faster growth, he added, could make the near-surface fish more resilient to overfishing. (Related: "Warming Oceans Put Kink in Food Chain, Study Says" [January 30, 2007].) By contrast, deepwater fish are growing 20 to 30 percent slower than they were 50 years ago. Their slowing growth rates correlate with a long-term cooling of the deep waters. The cause of the cooling trend is unclear. But analysis of deepwater corals suggests it has been going on for centuries and may be independent of global warming, Thresher said ... " The unpredicted benefit to global warming.


www.cmar.csiro.au [cached]

Ron Thresher
Ron Thresher[profile]


www.angfaqld.org.au [cached]

Original story by Ron Thresher, CSIRO at The Conversation


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory