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Wrong Roger Woodruff?

Roger A. Woodruff

Director

Wildlife Services

Direct Phone: (360) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Wildlife Services

Background Information

Employment History

State Director

U.S. Department of Agriculture


Guarding Dog Specialist

ADC specialist


Web References(36 Total References)


rodrepel.com

They've learned to steal the most nutritious morsels from the cattle troughs and pose an ever-present threat of moving disease from one ranch to another, said Roger Woodruff, director of Wildlife Services in Washington.
Nearly 650,000 starlings were poisoned last year in the state, an all-time record, he said.


www.heraldnet.com

They've learned to steal the most nutritious morsels from the cattle troughs and pose an ever-present threat of moving disease from one ranch to another, said Roger Woodruff, director of Wildlife Services in Washington.
Nearly 650,000 starlings were poisoned last year in Washington, an all-time record, he said.


www.selahnews.com

Roger Woodruff, State Director of USDA Wildlife Services for Washington said the birds congregate in large numbers, from 20,000 to 250,000 birds each winter at feedlots and dairies. "We had one feedlot with a quarter million birds," he said."Birds were virtually perched on everything--rails, backs of cows, leaving droppings in feeders and water."Woodruff said the Starlings cause enormous economic damage by consuming feed.Woodruff said he heard a story that a man enamored with the writings of William Shakespeare decided to introduce each bird mentioned in Shakespeare's writing to the United States.The European Starling, or Sturnus vulgaris, has now spread across the North American continent.They are among the most prolific breeders, producing two to four offspring per clutch twice a year."They reproduce very rapidly and are considered an invasive species," Woodruff said."The impact is immense, on wildlife and the environment."An executive order mandates that federal agencies control invasive species, although the USDA program to eliminate Starlings in Washington operates primarily at the request of feedlots."There is no widespread, state program," Woodruff said.The poison used to control the birds is called DRC 13-39, a toxicant developed years ago that is highly selective and safe to people, pets, and wildlife, he said.Starlings that die from this toxicant can be scavenged by other animals with no harm, Woodruff said.The poison can kill other birds, but the method of application mitigates that risk."First, Starlings are 100 times more susceptible than, say, hawks would be," he said."Secondly, we control the baiting.We pre-bait so beforehand we know what birds are coming to bait pile.If other birds are coming in, then we don't put it out." Woodruff said they know how many Starlings, and what other species, if any, are coming to a bait pile.Woodruff said the Starlings can cause a tremendous amount of damage to the fruit industry as well.Woodruff said they do the baiting about a dozen times a year."We're still receiving a call or two, but within a few weeks we'll be completely finished up, once the Starlings begin to disperse," he said."And no more in Selah this year."Spread The Word


www.wcfarmfriends.com [cached]

John Quanz Receives Wildlife Specialist Award from the Washington Wildlife Services State Director Roger Woodruff


www.hallofshame.lovecanadageese.com [cached]

Roger Woodruff, state director of wildlife services for the USDA in Olympia, said there's a window of three to four weeks in June and July when geese molt and can't fly.
So on June 28, Woodruff's agency herded the Puyallup geese to a pen at Bradley Lake Park and gassed them with carbon dioxide -- the most humane way to kill them, he said. The agency does so at the request of communities where geese are causing problems, Woodruff said. "It's been a difficult issue to deal with," he said. The animals were imported to Washington in the late 1960s and early 1970s in an effort to replace native geese whose nests were flooded by dam projects on the Columbia River. In 2000, there were about 25,000 of them in Western Washington, causing about $1 million in damage annually, Woodruff said. That year, the agency opted for the last resort: catching and killing them. "Boy, that has really, really turned things around," Woodruff said.


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