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Wrong Roger Ulrich?

Roger S. Ulrich

Director of the Center for Health Systems and Design

Texas A&M University

HQ Phone:  (979) 845-7800

Direct Phone: (979) ***-****direct phone

Email: u***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Texas A&M University

5000 Tamu

College Station, Texas,77843

United States

Company Description

Texas A&M University, recognized as having one of the premier engineering programs in the world, has offered undergraduate degrees in chemical, electrical, mechanical and petroleum engineering at Qatar Foundation's Education City campus since 2003, and graduat...more

Background Information

Employment History

Professor of Architecture At the Center for Healthcare Building Research

Chalmers University of Technology


Director of the Center for Health Systems and Design

Texas A&M University


Affiliations

The Center for Health Design

Director


Harmony Institute

Scientific Advisory Board Member


Healthcare Design Magazine

Editorial Advisory Board


EDAC

Fellow


Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Invitation Research Fellow


Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations

Member of The Task Force


U.K. National Health Service

Senior Advisor


Britain

Senior Advisor for Program


Symposium

Member, Advisory Board


Georgia Institute of Technology

Fellow, Center for Health Systems and Design


Patient Care

Senior Advisor On the Environment


Future

International Committee


NHS

Advisor


Architectural Research Centers Consortium INC

Member of the National Executive Board


UrbanEcosystems

Member, Editorial Boards


Scenic America

Member


Education

Ph. D.

Chalmers University of Technology


Ph.D.

College of Architecture at Texas A&M University


Web References(153 Total References)


Film of Nature in North Carolina - Nature's Light - Sunlit Paths

natureslight.org [cached]

Roger S. Ulrich, architecture professor at Texas A & M University, is the leading researcher in the use of nature in healthcare.
He explains the decline of its use in the early decades of the 1900's. "Gardens became less prevalent in hospitals...as major advances in medical science caused hospital administrators and architects to concentrate on creating healthcare buildings that would reduce infection risk and serve as functionally efficient settings for new medical technology." In 1984, Ulrich conducted the classic study which demonstrated that patients with a hospital window view of greenery healed faster than patients without such a view. In Ulrich's 2002 overview, Health Benefits of Gardens in Hospitals, he found growing scientific evidence that viewing gardens can measurably reduce patient stress and improve health outcomes. One of the most interesting findings of Ulrich's research overview is that the images of nature have a positive effect on the viewer, whatever its form - photos, murals, video or actual greenery or flowers.


Healthcare Committee - Page 4 - Korean Community Center of Greater Princeton (KCCP)

www.kccprinceton.org [cached]

"Some hospitals are taking evidence-based design seriously," said Roger Ulrich, director of the Center for Health Systems and Design at Texas A&M.


Nature Healing: The Power of Spending Time with Wildlife - Pain-Free Living Life

www.painfreelivinglife.com [cached]

In one classic study from 1991, Roger Ulrich, the co-founding director of the Center for Health Systems and Design at Texas A&M University, and other researchers found that after being subjected to a stress-inducing movie and then shown one of six videotapes of either a natural or urban setting, participants exposed to a videotape of a natural environment recovered from the stress more quickly than those exposed to an urban videotape.


Research | Sereneview

sereneview.com [cached]

The Role of the Physical Environment in the Hospital in the 21st Century: A Once-in-a-Lifetime Opportunity, Report to The Center for Health Design for the Designing the 21st Century Hospital Project (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation), September 2004, Roger Ulrich, Ph.D., Craig Zimring, Ph.D., et. al. Evaluation of over 600 studies showing that improved physical settings can be an important tool in making hospitals more healing, better places to work.
Roger Ulrich, PhD, director and professor, Center of Health Systems and Design, College of Architecture, Texas A&M University, College Station, investigated the effects of visual stimulation on the rate of recuperation. He found that patients with vibrant surroundings (e.g., paintings, flowers, an outside view, etc.) recovered three-quarters of a day faster, and needed fewer painkillers than those with dull surroundings.


PBCreprint

pleasantbaycenters.com [cached]

''There is a growing dissatisfaction internationally with traditional health-care environments,'' said Dr. Roger Ulrich, an environmental psychologist and professor at the Center for Health Systems and Design at Texas A & M University.
Dr. Ulrich's 1984 study of patients recovering from gall bladder surgery found that those who could view trees and sky recovered faster, with fewer painkillers and complaints, than those viewing brick walls. His findings jolted medical administrators out of their windowless corridors.


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