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2015-04-05T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Roger Coup?

Mr. Roger Coup

Wildlife Management Supervisor

Pennsylvania Game Commission

HQ Phone: (717) 787-4250

Pennsylvania Game Commission

2001 Elmerton Avenue

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110

United States

Company Description

The Pennsylvania Game Commission manages more than 35 percent of all public lands in Pennsylvania and is not subject to any state or legislative oversight. Bill 2181 would place the PGC under the Regulatory Review Act of Pennsylvania. The act ensures that... more

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Background Information

Employment History

Wildlife Management Director
PA Game Commission

Student and Wildlife Management Supervisor
Delta Waterfowl

Web References (21 Total References)


But the most important place we're ...

www.goerie.com [cached]

But the most important place we're spotting eagles is not on YouTube, but in the sky, sitting on their massive nests or diving for fish on local waterways, said Roger Coup, wildlife management supervisor for the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

...
The 100 or so pairs living in northwestern Pennsylvania, part of more than 250 active nests in Pennsylvania, are part of an important conservation success story, Coup said.
"A lot of factors went into the eagle's recovery," he said.
...
But it's more than that, Coup said.
"The fact that they are also our national emblem and the fact that they have made such a remarkable recovery, I think that touches people," he said.


The Times Observer, Warren, Pennsylvania

www.timesobserver.com [cached]

"There are certain species that are more likely to get the disease," Wildlife Management Supervisor Roger Coup of the Pennsylvania Game Commission said.Those are called vector species.

"Raccoons, skunks and foxes, are probably the top three on the list," he said."Groundhogs.And of course bats are on the list.
But, "any mammal is capable of getting the disease," Coup said.
In terms of calls about rabies, this summer has been an unusually busy one for the commission.
Coup said many of the calls have been from people who have found baby animals in their yards."We had a tremendous number of calls this year," he said."Mostly, people are finding baby raccoons in their yards."
When the mother doesn't return, people sometimes try to help.That often involves picking the babies up and moving them.
But people can't do much to help baby animals and frequently do more harm than good, Coup said.
"You're not doing wildlife any good by picking it up and trying to help," Coup said."Let nature take its course."
And there are dangers for people who handle wildlife - whether the animal is newborn or full-grown.
"They end up getting bitten or scratched," Coup said of many people who handle wild creatures.
...
Aggression," Coup said."The animal could just look extremely ill."
But there aren't always familiar clues, or any at all.
"Foaming at the mouth doesn't occur all the time," Coup said."Often, you wouldn't see any symptoms."
So, Coup recommends a respectful caution.
"You can observe wildlife at a distance," he said."But respect them, respect their space."
"If you see a wild animal, leave it alone," Coup said.
The animals will typically do the same for people, he said.
If they don't, or for any other reason people and wild animals come in close contact, Coup suggests calling experts.
"Contact the game commission or local authorities to look into it," he said.


Meadville Tribune - Woman tells of horrifying deer collision

www.meadvilletribune.com [cached]

While deer normally are a road hazard in the fall when they're on the move as mating season begins, they can also be hazardous in the spring for a couple of reasons, said Roger Coup, a wildlife management supervisor with the Pennsylvania Game Commission's northwest regional office in Franklin.

"Does are moving to feed themselves and their fawns," he said.


Meadville Tribune - Woman tells of horrifying deer collision

www.meadvilletribune.com [cached]

While deer normally are a road hazard in the fall when they're on the move as mating season begins, they can also be hazardous in the spring for a couple of reasons, said Roger Coup, a wildlife management supervisor with the Pennsylvania Game Commission's northwest regional office in Franklin.

"Does are moving to feed themselves and their fawns," he said.


Hen Houses Raise Mallards… – D.W.

www.duckhunter.net [cached]

Jim Cook assisted in southern Ontario, while wildlife biologist Kevin Jacobs, a former Delta student, and wildlife management supervisor Roger Coup helped supervise in Pennsylvania.

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