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Wrong Roger Albin?

Roger L. Albin

Professor of Neurology

University of Michigan

HQ Phone:  (734) 936-4000

Direct Phone: (734) ***-****direct phone

Email: r***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Michigan

1150 W. Medical Center Drive

Ann Arbor, Michigan,48109

United States

Company Description

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan (U-M) is widely recognized as one of the world's leading research universities. The hallmark of the University is the breadth of excellence across its 19 schools and colleges and the exceptional degree of interdiscip...more

Web References(77 Total References)


Long Island Care Center Home | Our Services

longislandcarecenter.com [cached]

"The PVS diagnosis is the result of a clinical evaluation supported by imaging and supportive data such as electroencephalogram [EEG]," said Roger Albin, MD.
He is a professor of neurology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Although the prevalence of PVS is unknown, Dr. Albin said that several thousand people in the U.S. are estimated to be in PVS. Dr. Albin pointed out that hopeful family members and even physicians can be confused by some of the typical phenomena seen in individuals in PVS. "They can have a variety of spontaneous or stimulus-solicited movements, and can look purposeful," he said. The presence of these movements is the reason repeated evaluations are necessary, he said. Dr. Albin stressed that the diagnosis cannot be made from a single bedside assessment; it takes repeated, prolonged observations along with the imaging studies and EEG. The assumption that a patient who has been in PVS for several years will not recover is uniformly true, Dr. Albin said. "The literature and the AAN guidelines indicate that PVS from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy for three months is considered to be permanent," he said. "If the condition results from head trauma, PVS is considered permanent after it continues for a year. In a case in which PVS has continued for several years, the chance of recovery is "virtually zero," he said. When stories circulate about such patients recovering, the diagnosis of PVS was probably inaccurate, Dr. Albin said. They may have, been, instead, in a minimally conscious state, which is characterized by some evidence of the patient's intermittent awareness of his or her surroundings. Minimally conscious patients show at least intermittent awareness of their environment by making the same responses to the same stimuli, by more consistently responding to commands, and otherwise showing purposeful behavior, according to Dr. Albin. Patients in a minimally conscious state have a far better chance of recovery, he said. "The best thing physicians can do is to encourage patients and make them aware of what their choices are, and to have open discussions with family members," Dr. Albin said. He stressed that the best time to have such conversations is before a crisis occurs.


www.alzheimersweekly.com

In addition to Kotagal, the study's authors include Kenneth Langa, M.D., Ph.D., who holds professorships in both the U-M Medical School and Institute for Social Research; U-M neurologist Roger Albin, M.D., U-M neuropsychologist Bruno Giordani, Ph.D. and U-M researcher Mohamed Kabeto, M.S. Authors from other institutions are Brenda Plassman, Ph.D. of Duke University, who directs the ADAMS study from which the data on dementia patients was obtained; and James Burke, M.D., Ph.D., Gwenith G. Fisher, PhD, Robert B. Wallace, MD, MS, David C. Steffens, MD, MH and Norman L. Foster, MD. Langa is a member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.


The 4th International Scientific Symposium on Tourette Syndrome: Faculty

www.clevelandclinicmeded.com [cached]

Roger Albin, M.D. University of Michigan Medical Center


awesomeduck.tumblr.com

Roger L. Albin, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Michigan and chief of Neuroscience Research at the VA in Ann Arbor - told Neurology Today that he thought the most interesting aspect of the study "is that they seem to be parsing out a subgroup, and that may turn out to be a very useful result."
"This technology might be useful for clinical research, to try to define subtypes and target therapies," he said.


www.myana.org

Roger L. Albin, MD
University of Michigan


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