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This profile was last updated on 7/5/05  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

7 Total References
Web References
American News | 07/05/2005 | Aberdeen publishing company bringing Native stories to life
www.aberdeennews.com, 5 July 2005 [cached]
Robin Vallie, owner of Coyote Publishing, said he plans to release his short book "Little Red Fire and the Waterspirit" July 31.
Vallie said it is one of 72 children's stories he wrote featuring the character Little Red Fire.Coyote Publishing will handle the first book.Larger publishing companies, including Barnes & Noble and Borders, are interested in some of the other stories, Vallie said.For now, Vallie said, he's focusing on 36 of the stories.
Like most of Vallie's stories, "Little Red Fire and the Waterspirit" has to do with the main character interacting with an aspect of nature.Little Red Fire is a young Chippewa American Indian growing up in the 1700s.He learns of life through observations and vision quests as he encounters water, fire, wind, animals and other forces of nature.Modern technologically hang-ups won't be found in the book, Vallie said.
Vallie said "Little Red Fire and the Waterspirit" is short, probably about 10 pages, and easy to read.
...
"Finding the right illustrator is very, very hard," said the 51-year-old Vallie.He added he knew Bird Faraway from his time in Montana.
Now 21, Bird Faraway said he has enjoyed drawing most of his life.He and Vallie used to work together on an Indian newsletter in Montana.He is a friend of Vallie's son.Both author and illustrator are American Indians.
Vallie said "Little Red Fire and the Waterspirit" was selected as the first story to publish because Bird Faraway liked it.Together, the men worked on designing Little Red Fire and the other characters, One Bear, Night Hawk and Spirit Wolf.
Already, Vallie said, he's tested the book in some American Indian schools and gotten good feedback.And, he said, older folks enjoy the stories as much as kids do.
One appeal of the stories, Vallie said, is that they are taken from the stories American Indians orally share with each other.But, he said, story-telling isn't what it once was."We live in modern ages and we don't have the memories we used to," he said.
The first book will probably be marketed in the Dakotas, Montana and other surrounding states, Vallie said.If the story is liked, he's confident others with bigger audiences and publishers will follow.
"Quality will sustain over a period of time," Vallie said.
Vallie said he wrote the stories over the course of many years and has always wanted to publish them.But Indian culture doesn't stress rushing to meet a certain timeframe, he said.
With Bird Faraway, Vallie said he hopes to grow Coyote Publishing.The business was started about two years ago, and Vallie said he's open to publishing niche books or stories that cater to other cultures as well.
Aside from his publishing work, Vallie said he's a sundancer who participates in native ceremonies.He also has an interest in native herbs, medicine and healing.
Some of the other Little Red Fire stories Vallie has written include:
- "Little Red Fire Meets Bigfoot,"
- "Little Red Fire and the Search for Thunder,"
- "Little Red Fire and the Star People,"
- "Little Red Fire and the Loon" and
- "Little Red Fire and the Animal Kingdom."
Coyote Publishing is located at 16 Second Ave. S.W.
American News | 03/01/2005 | Knight's Advisory Starts New Term
www.aberdeennews.com, 1 Mar 2005 [cached]
- Robin Vallie, president, Coyote Publishing
American News | 02/22/2004 | 'Tourism Triangle' forming
www.aberdeennews.com, 22 Feb 2004 [cached]
The Northern Route to the Black Hills Association is promoting an alternate, slower route to the Black Hills, says chairman Robin Vallie.NRTBHA hopes to reach its goal - increasing tourism funds for northeastern South Dakota and enhancing tourism and economic development statewide - with help from the state and you.
Traveling the triangle: Each year millions of visitors spend about $680 million in South Dakota, Vallie said.
Most of South Dakota's tourism focuses on the Black Hills, but NRTBHA hopes to change that.It aims to permanently increase tourism by 10 percent for the section of northern South Dakota along its proposed route.That means an approximately $6 million annual increase in tourism for that region, Vallie said.
...
The northern route concentrates on areas along U.S. Highway 12, but also includes communities farther out, like Britton and Redfield, Vallie said.
Attracting crowds: A vacation is meant to get people away from the hustle and bustle of regular life, Vallie said."The northern route is the place to do that."
The group's slogans include "rush less to Rushmore" and "take the slower, friendlier route to the Black Hills."They were proposed by Danielle Aman of Aberdeen, Vallie said.
...
Vallie said Aberdeen is a logical stopping point - it's about halfway between the Twin Cities and Medora, N.D.
...
Vallie, who is also president of Aberdeen's Coyote Publishing, said there will also be a Native American Education Cultural Museum consisting of miniature Native American villages.This, he said, will help enhance the visibility of Native American culture - an important aspect of tourism in South Dakota.
Education courses on Indian history and customs will soon be offered to the Native community in and around Aberdeen, with classes being taught by Native Americans."This will be culture in its finest," Vallie said.Students will then build entire museum-quality mini-villages depicting what they learned.
A tentative opening date for the museum is mid- to late June, Vallie said.Villages will be built over the summer, and the hope is to have an entire museum of five to 10 villages by the end of summer, he said.Eventually, tourists - especially kids - can participate in the village-making as an activity.Tourists will also be able to put up and take down real life-size teepees.
Outside of Aberdeen, there are several other "hidden treasures" along the northern route that can't be seen from the interstate, Vallie said.
...
The idea is to get tourists who previously would have just headed straight to the Hills on I-90 to stop and stay an extra day because of the attractions along the slower route, Vallie said.
Direct marketing: To promote these places, NRTBHA will use a direct marketing approach, Vallie said.This method is based on the idea that many travelers often travel to places where they have friends, relatives or business associates.South Dakotans will send names, addresses or e-mail addresses to be compiled into a database by NRTBHA.Information - coupons, tourist packages, event information - will be sent to these people.
NRTBHA also hopes to get Gov.Mike Rounds' office involved with this, Vallie said.
...
A letter from the governor will get people's attention, Vallie said, but it will also be personalized for them with their friends' names.
The group plans to approach the governor's office to see if there is interest, Vallie said.NRTBHA is optimistic, he says, because its goals fit in with Gov.Rounds' plan to increase tourism in the state.
"We do take the governor at his word," Vallie said."We expect the governor's support in this."
Gaining support: Right now the group hasn't received any financial support, though it has applied for a $100,000 state Department of Tourism grant.Vallie expects to hear about that very soon.
Aberdeen's Blackstone development group has pledged to match the grant.
Things will move forward with or without help from the state, Vallie said, but the state's help will make things easier and faster.Two to five years is a fair estimate with state help for the Northern Route to the Black Hills to kick into gear; without, it will likely take longer.
Besides Blackstone, NRTBHA has gotten support from all areas, Vallie said, including Aberdeen Mayor Tom Hopper and the Aberdeen City Commission, state legislators, Fort Sisseton, Webster Mayor Mike Grosek, the Standing Rock Tribal Tourism Department and area chambers of commerce, including Aberdeen's.
...
"South Dakota is not an island," Vallie said."We need surrounding states."
Vallie assured that the intent of this venture is not to draw tourism away from the Black Hills, but to expand tourism in the entire state.NRTBHA hopes to bring new money into South Dakota and keep it here.
In fact, one of Vallie's personal goals is to get people to understand the economic importance of keeping money in South Dakota - every time a dollar is spent here, it generally circulates seven times, he said.
That means the $6 million increase in area tourism could actually translate into $42 million.
Though a volunteer group is spearheading the initial effort, Vallie hopes people along the whole route will get involved in some way.Brochures will be coming out very soon.
"There's strength in numbers," Vallie said."Collectively we can all start building economic development throughout the state."
John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
www.knightfdn.org, 3 Mar 2005 [cached]
Robin Vallie, president, Coyote Publishing.
Rapid City Journal: Serving Rapid City South Dakota
www.rapidcityjournal.com, 23 Feb 2004 [cached]
The goal of the Northern Route to the Black Hills Association is to permanently increase tourism by 10 percent or about $6 million annually for the region, chairman Robin Vallie said.
The group is targeting a triangle route that would take travelers across northern South Dakota, up to Theodore Roosevelt National Park in western North Dakota and then down to the Black Hills.
It concentrates on areas along U.S. Highway 12 but also includes communities farther out such as Britton and Redfield, Vallie said.
A vacation is meant to get people away from the hustle and bustle of regular life, Vallie said."The northern route is the place to do that."
The group's slogans include "rush less to Rushmore" and "take the slower, friendlier route to the Black Hills."A key to getting people to use the route is promoting places to stop on the way, Vallie said.The city of Aberdeen, Fort Sisseton north of Webster and Lake Oahe at Mobridge are among the attractions, he said.
The idea is to encourage tourists, who previously would have just headed straight to the Hills on Interstate 90, to take an extra day or two and visit attractions along the slower route in the north, Vallie said.The organization has applied for a $100,000 state Department of Tourism grant and a development group in Aberdeen has pledged to match the grand, Vallie said.
The idea is not to draw tourism away from the Black Hills but to expand tourism in the entire state, he said.
Vallie said he hopes people along the whole route will get involved in some way.Brochures will be coming out soon.
"There's strength in numbers," Vallie said."Collectively we can all start building economic development throughout the state."
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