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This profile was last updated on 4/19/12  and contains information from public web pages.

Ms. Robin Karr-Morse

Wrong Robin Karr-Morse?

Lecturer On the Faculty

Brazelton Seminar
 
Background

Employment History

  • Licensed Family Therapist and A Lecturer
    Brazelton Seminar
  • Executive Director
    Parenting Institute
  • First Executive Director
    Oregon Children's Trust Fund
  • Founding Director
    Oregon Children's Trust Fund
  • Child Advocate
    21st Century Speakers Inc
  • Race Matters

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Founder
    Parenting Institute

Education

  • M.ED. , Counseling
    Lewis and Clark College
54 Total References
Web References
Race Matters - Robin Karr-Morse
www.racematters.org, 19 April 2012 [cached]
Robin Karr-Morse Race Matters - Robin Karr-Morse
...
Robin Karr-Morse
Headline stories on violent youth alarm Americans but leave us wondering how and why and what we can do to change the course. Robin Karr-Morse, co-author of Ghosts From the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence offers a shocking but empowering message: To understand the tide of violent behavior, we must look earlier, before adolescence, before grade school, before preschool - to the cradle.
Karr-Morse argues that the traditional explanations of the cause of violence, such as poverty, are simplistic and allow the rest of society to distance itself from the very intimate realities shaping children in homes of all classes. In an effort to explore the seemingly unanswerable question - why do children kill and what can we do to keep this from happening - she weaves together numerous case studies, including death row interviews and stories of children in the news, with the newest scientific research from the fields of neurobiology and early brain development.
She presents voluminous and startling evidence that points to the earliest months of life as the time in which violent behavior is born and cultivated. Recent research shows that infancy is the stage during which the foundations for trust, empathy, conscience, and lifelong learning and thinking are laid down - or during which a predisposition to violent behavior is "hardwired" into the brain.
Karr-Morse is a veteran of both child welfare and public education systems in Oregon. Formerly the Director of Parent Training for the Oregon child welfare system, she has designed and administered three statewide programs for families with children, including one focusing on pre-parenting in high schools, one on teen parents and one on families reported for abuse and neglect. She was the first executive director of the Oregon Children's Trust fund, a major public effort to prevent child abuse statewide. Karr-Morse was consultant to Dr. T. Berry Brazelton's Touchpoints Program and is a lecturer on the Brazelton Seminar Faculty. Recently, Karr-Morse has worked with county, state and national officials to create social policies which support families in monitoring the earliest development to prevent delinquency and school failure.
She is currently a family therapist in private practice in Portland, Oregon where she lives with her husband and the youngest of her four children. Karr-Morse is a parent, adoptive parent, stepparent, formerly a foster parent and a grandmother to four-year-old Emily.
For anyone who ever wondered what they could do to make the world a more peaceful and civilized place, Karr-Morse offers a remarkable and timely presentation.
Childwatch
www.apbspeakers.com, 25 June 1999 [cached]
Robin Karr-MorseCo-author of Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence, Karr-Morse is a licensed family therapist and a lecturer at the Brazelton Seminar Faculty.She served as the first executive director of the Oregon Children's Trust Fund.
Press Release - Prendergast Award to Richard Akin
www.leememorial.org, 23 Mar 2010 [cached]
Akin's award will be presented following a lecture by one of the country's foremost and sought-after speakers on child abuse, Robin Karr-Morse. Karr-Morse, an author and therapist, will deliver a speech entitled, "Ghosts From the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence". Karr-Morse offers a shocking, but empowering message: to understand violent behavior, we must look earlier - before adolescence, before grade school, before pre-school - to the cradle.
Karr-Morse will present startling evidence that points out that violent behavior is born and cultivated as early as the earliest months of life. It is well-known that the foundations for trust, empathy, conscience and lifelong learning are laid down in infancy. It is also when a predisposition towards violent behavior is "hardwired" into the brain, strongly influenced by environment and neurobiological makeup. Karr-Morse currently continues her work to shift the focus of community systems of social and mental health practices from fixing broken kids to building healthy ones as Executive Director of the Parenting Institute.
Groups meet for the good of children :: Montana Forum :: If it's happening in Montana, we're discussing it on Montana Forum
www.montanaforum.com, 22 Mar 2004 [cached]
The 2004 Montana Early Childhood Conference and the 13th annual Parent Expo are slated to begin Thursday and Friday, respectively, with organizers of the two events partnering to co-sponsor keynote speaker Robin Karr-Morse, co-author of "Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence."Karr-Morse, who will speak at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the University of Montana's University Theatre, is a nationally renowned children's advocate, family therapist and founder of the Parenting Institute.She will offer a shocking but empowering message concerning the rising tide of violent behavior among children.
Karr-Morse suggests that traditional explanations of the cause of violence, such as poverty, are simplistic and allow the rest of society to distance itself from the intimate realities shaping children in homes of all classes.Instead, she argues that to trace the roots of violence, people must look much earlier - before, adolescence, before grade school - to the cradle.
"We are seeing more and more little ones shaped by factors that amount to forms of neglect and abuse that set kids up for later occurring aggression and violence," Karr-Morse said in a telephone interview Monday.
"In a child's first 33 months (including time in the womb), the brain literally builds itself from experience," she said.
A normally nurtured child - one that is picked up and soothed when he cries, one that is fed when he is hungry, one that is read to and sung to - builds a different brain than a child left to cry, a child given a propped up bottle, a child slapped from time to time by a frustrated parent, she said.
Karr-Morse will speak about research that shows how abuse and neglect during the first years of life can predispose children to violent behavior.She'll point to recent research that shows that infancy is the stage during which the foundations of trust, empathy, conscience and lifelong learning and thinking are built.
She'll discuss basic brain physiology underlying child abuse and neglect, case histories of some children who have committed violent crimes, and why she believes violent behavior is learned and cultivated in the first few months of childhood.She'll also suggest ways to prevent violence in children, including community programs and public policies that have proven effective in reducing the growing problem.
Karr-Morse, a veteran of both child welfare and public education systems in Oregon, was the first executive director of the Children's Trust Fund of Oregon, a statewide public endeavor to prevent child abuse.She designed and administered three statewide programs for families with children, including one focusing on pre-parenting in high schools, one on teen parents and one on families reported for abuse and neglect.
As founder of the Parenting Institute, she provides parents with developmental knowledge, skills and support to raise happy and healthy children.
"I've been seeing families for a lot of years and I've realized we all tend to parent as we were parented," she said.
Author, Child-Welfare Advocate ...
www.idahopublictv.com, 8 April 2008 [cached]
Author, Child-Welfare Advocate Robin Karr-Morse on This Week's DIALOGUE
...
On this week's edition of DIALOGUE, host Joan Cartan-Hansen talks with Robin Karr-Morse, a child-welfare advocate, co-author of the book Ghosts from the Nursery and the first executive director of the Oregon Children's Trust Fund.
...
Karr-Morse was in Boise as a guest of the Idaho Children's Trust Fund, and spoke at the 2008 annual conference. As she will on DIALOGUE, Kerr-Morse explained abuse or neglect "hard-wires" the brain and may lead to a propensity for violence. On the show, she also suggests ways viewers can break this cycle.
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