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Wrong Robin Edelstein?

Robin S. Edelstein

Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Literature, Scienc

University of Michigan

HQ Phone:  (734) 936-4000

Direct Phone: (734) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Michigan

1150 W. Medical Center Drive

Ann Arbor, Michigan,48109

United States

Company Description

Founded in 1817, the University of Michigan (U-M) is widely recognized as one of the world's leading research universities. The hallmark of the University is the breadth of excellence across its 19 schools and colleges and the exceptional degree of interdiscip...more

Web References(32 Total References)


Consensual non-monogamy: Table for more than two, please | Magazine issue 6/2014 - Issue 21 | In-Mind

www.in-mind.org [cached]

written by Amy Moors, William Chopik, Robin Edelstein & Terri Conley
written by Amy Moors, William Chopik, Robin Edelstein & Terri Conley To answer these questions, we (Moors, Conley, Edelstein, & Chopik, 2014) asked 1,281 heterosexual people, who had never engaged in CNM, to report their anxiety and avoidance in relationships, attitudes toward CNM (e.g., "If my partner wanted to be non-monogamous, I would be open to that"), and willingness to engage in CNM (e.g., "You and your partner": "go together to swinger parties where partners are exchanged for the night"; "take on a third partner to join you in your relationship on equal terms"). In another study, we found that people in CNM relationships reported lower levels of avoidance compared to people in monogamous relationships (Moors, Conley, Edelstein, et al., 2014). Robin Edelstein Robin Edelstein is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan. Her work is devoted to understanding individual...more


Daddy Makeover | Costhetics

www.costhetics.com.au [cached]

"Having lower testosterone is good if you're around a child, because you're going to be less aggressive, and it promotes nurturance," says Robin Edelstein, an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan and co-author of a study on hormonal shifts.


Inner Universe - Life Coach - December 2011

www.inneruniverse.com [cached]

People who avoid issues or painful memories may enjoy short-term gains but suffer long-term consequences, according to Robin Edelstein, a psychology professor at University of Michigan.
"While avoiding things can be a helpful short-term strategy, not paying attention to certain things for extended periods of time might be bad for your mental health with consequences for your physical health. All the efforts to avoid anxiety, actually creates more anxiety later," Edelstein said. "The best solution is to do something about it rather than just thinking about it or hiding it, according to Edelstein.


Expectant Fathers' Hormones Change During Their Partner's Pregnancy - Expecting Father | Baby Corner

www.thebabycorner.com [cached]

Robin Edelstein, associate professor of psychology at the University of Michigan stated, "We don't yet know exactly why men's hormones are changing.


www.goodhousekeeping.com

New mothers' senses are definitely heightened, likely thanks to greater amounts of the stress hormone cortisol, says Robin Edelstein, Ph.D., professor of psychology at the University of Michigan.
Cortisol levels increase quite a bit during pregnancy and stay somewhat elevated postpartum, which may help women be attentive to their infants, says Edelstein.


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