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Wrong Roberta Platt?

Roberta Platt

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Officer

Ripley Alumni Association


Affiliations

Delaney Auxiliary Post

Member


Education

Ripley


Web References(1 Total References)


The Ledger Independent

maysville-online.thimblemedia.com [cached]

Roberta PlattRoberta Platt graduated from Ripley in 1957, the same year Maysville's all-black Fee High School integrated with the all-white Maysville City school system.Platt's memories of high school seem more divergent, perhaps because she attended Ripley while the civil rights movement was just beginning to register on the national consciousness.Platt could not recall any direct racial hostility, saying much of the student body got along very well.'The students weren't so bad, and the teachers were fine,' said Platt. Platt remembered a place called the Green Door as a popular hangout that African Americans seldom patronized, not because it barred blacks from entering, but because black youth had other places to socialize.'Nobody tried to go in the Green Door,' said Platt. 'It was the place where all the white children hung out, so we never bothered.'Instead of students, the administrators seemed to be the more likely source of any racial bias, Platt said.'A lot of black students didn't get recognition,' she said.Platt reflected on an experience that occurred at a banquet held by the Ripley Alumni Association her senior year that sparked some turmoil at the time.'The speaker for the dinner sent his credentials and resume to the superintendent before the dinner, but when he showed up, it turned out he was a black man,' Platt said.She continued, 'The superintendent met with the speaker out in the hall, and I don't know what happened out there, but the speaker never got into the auditorium.There never was an explanation.'Platt was serving dinner at the banquet as a member of the old Delaney Auxiliary Post.'The legion stopped serving meals after that,' Platt said.Platt said African Americans were not allowed to join the Alumni Association until 1963, when Bill Wayson, Robert Carpenter and Robert Bridges helped to eliminate the restriction.Platt is currently an officer in the Ripley Alumni Association.Many African-American students have passed through the halls of Ripley's schools.


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