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This profile was last updated on 5/1/01  and contains information from public web pages.

Robert J. Sherwood

Wrong Robert J. Sherwood?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Strategic Marketing Business Consultant
    RJSVentures.com
  • Strategic Marketing Business Consultant
Web References
Texas Construction - Association Links
www.txconstruction.com, 1 May 2001 [cached]
Recently , Robert Sherwood , a strategic marketing business consultant for RJSVentures.com in Leawood , KS , provided the Construction Industry Manufacturers Association with a competitive intelligence program.
Sherwood , who had provided consulting services for more than 100 companies , outlined a four-step process for gathering competitive intelligence that construction companies can access to find pertinent business data on other firms.The four steps are as follows :.Step One : Determine what information about your competitors will be useful to your company.Step Two : Collect competitive information from government and internet sources , such as the Secretary of State offices Securities and Exchange Commission filings ; for example : sales statistics , number of employees , profitability , number of offices or board of directors.Step Three : Analyze the information that has been collected.Make the information visible to all.Sherwood suggests using a room with data posted on the walls for staff from various departments to view the material.Step Four : Strategize by making an industry demographic assessment andidentifying what factors are causing change.
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AEM | News & Information - AEM News -- CIMA Seminar Outlines Research Tips and Resources: "Competitive Intelligence": Where to Find It, How to Do It
www.aem.org, 3 Mar 2001 [cached]
Whatever the questions, knowing what you want to find out is an essential step before initiating a competitive intelligence program that will assure your company locates the information that will be useful to its business planning, according to Robert Sherwood, a strategic marketing business consultant.
Sherwood, who heads RJSVentures.Com in Leawood, Kansas, has provided consulting services for more than 100 companies, some with sales up to $5 billion.He outlined a four-step process for gathering competitive intelligence during a recent teleseminar conducted by the Construction Industry Manufacturers Association (CIMA).
During the CIMA educational session, Sherwood relayed several sources that construction companies can access to find pertinent business data on other firms.
Planning Key Step
Determining what information about competitors will be useful to your company is the first step in the process and one that will prevent wasted effort, Sherwood noted.He explained that many companies that just instruct their marketing staff to collect everything they can find on competitors often come back with little that is useful because they didn't give enough thought to planning.
Although you may want to collect competitive intelligence just to track other companies, Sherwood said, it's also critical to understand how the information will affect your company's decisions.
Collection is the second step of a competitive intelligence program, according to Sherwood, and he advises to first check government and Internet sources for publicly available competitive information.
U.S. Government Resources
Some of the sources he cites are Secretary of State offices, since private corporations must file a large amount of information with these offices each year.Each state is different, but very often you can find out sales, number of employees, profitability, number of offices and the board of directors, Sherwood said.
Another source he mentions is Securities and Exchange Commission filings, which are available online at various sites."The SEC has over 200 different reports that they require to be filed by public corporations," Sherwood said.
Sherwood explains that the SEC's 10Q report is particularly useful, because it includes information on suppliers, vendors, contracts, and CEO compensation."If competitors have new projects or new partners, it'll be in there.The penalty for underdisclosing in an SEC report is heavy.If companies file accurate information, then the most accurate information companies are going to file is with the SEC."
Overseas companies doing business in the United States must also file about 30 different reports with the SEC, according to Sherwood, noting that reports from foreign companies start with the letter "F."
Check Uniform Commercial Code filings, available from Dun & Bradstreet, added Sherwood, if you want to know what companies are borrowing money, the method and what the money is to be used for.And Sherwood also recommends the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Web site, "since any company that's building a manufacturing plant has to apply for some sort of EPA permit."The EPA site can be searched by ZIP code or by hazardous waste, and permits are filed years before plants will be online, he said.
Internet Tracking Sites
Sherwood suggests using free Internet site tools that track competitive information and deliver it via e-mail.Some will notify a subscriber when particular website pages change, which can be used, for example, to monitor changes in competitors' press release pages, or their employment opportunity pages.
Others track information such as when companies apply for patents and trademarks, issue press releases, register website addresses, or get press coverage.
Sherwood noted that some search portals offer a method for researching the links to a competitor's website, providing benchmarking information which compares the number of links (and presumably, traffic) a competitor has and showing the Web addresses of linked sites which may reveal a competitor's business relationships.
Organizing the Information Your Company Already Has
Sherwood notes that many companies may not realize the amount of competitive intelligence they already have because the data exists in different departments.He suggests using Internet technology to collect and organize such information.A first step is asking staff via e-mail to send you any competitor information they may have.By putting the competitor's name in the subject field, incoming e-mails with information on different companies can automatically be sorted into different folders.
"Most companies with more than 100 people have plenty of competitive information internally," Sherwood said."The real issue is that it's not accessible when they want it, and it's not organized in a way that the person who needs it can get to it."
Step three is to analyze the information that's been collected, and key to doing this effectively is to make the information available, or "visible" to all.Sherwood suggests a company "war room" with data posted on the walls where staff from different departments can view the material.
"Your finance people, your engineering people, your production people - each looks at competitive intelligence with a different but significant view," he said."If information is tucked away in folders and people can't get a good, visual look at it, you don't get the same impact."
Strategizing: the Final Step
The final step to a competitive intelligence program is strategizing, says Sherwood.Start by making an industry demographic assessment, and identifying what factors are causing change."It's not enough to say the Internet is sparking change," Sherwood said."That's too broad.Instead, draw inferences from your industry analysis."
He suggests, for example, that rather than merely observing that the industry is growing at 12% a year, look at your own company's growth compared to industry growth rates, and what does that mean about company performance and its future.
At this stage of the competitive intelligence process, Sherwood recommends identifying dominant industry characteristics, determining the impact of each, and what your company and competitors are doing in response to these changes.Consider characteristics such as the economic environment, income changes, ecological changes, technological changes, political changes and cultural changes, Sherwood said.
The final exercise in a competitive intelligence program is to return to your initial questions, and determine what you would do differently if you knew the answers."If I said I wanted to know my competitors' sales, and I knew the answer, what would I do differently?This is the real key," Sherwood said.
For more information on the four-step competitive intelligence process, contact Robert Sherwood at www.rjsventures.com.
Construction Equipment Exports Show Gains for 2000
www.cimanet.com, 1 Mar 2001 [cached]
Whatever the questions , knowing what you want to find_out is an essential step before intitiating a competitive intelligence program that will assure your company locates the information that will be useful to its business planning , according to Robert Sherwood , a strategic marketing business consultant.
Sherwood , who heads RJSVentures.Com in Leawood , Kansas , has provided consulting services for more than 100 companies , some with sales up_to $ 5 billion.He outlined a four-step process for gathering competitive intelligence during a recent teleseminar conducted by the Construction Industry Manufacturers Association ( CIMA ) .
During the CIMA educational session , Sherwood relayed several sources that construction companies can access to find pertinent business data on other firms.
Planning Key Step
Determining what information about competitors will be useful to your company is the first step in the process and one that will prevent wasted effort , Sherwood noted.He explained that many companies that just instruct their marketing staff to collect everything they can find on competitors often come_back with little that is useful because they didn't give enough thought to planning.
Although you may want to collect competitive intelligence just to track other companies , Sherwood said , it's also critical to understand how the information will affect your company's decisions.
Collection is the second step of a competitive intelligence program , according to Sherwood , and he advises to first check government and Internet sources for publicly available competitive information.
U.S. Government Resources
Some of the sources he cites are Secretary of State offices , since private corporations must file a large amount of information with these offices each year.Each state is different , but very often you can find_out sales , number of employees , profitability , number of offices and the board_of_directors , Sherwood said.
Another source he mentions is Securities and Exchange Commission filings , which are available online at various sites.The SEC has over 200 different reports that they require to be filed by public corporations , Sherwood said.
Sherwood explains that the SEC's 10Q report is particularly useful , because it includes information on suppliers , vendors , contracts , and CEO compensation.If competitors have new projects or new partners , it'll be in there.The penalty for underdisclosing in an SEC report is heavy.If companies file accurate information , then the most accurate information companies are going to file is with the SEC..
Overseas companies doing business in the United_States must also file about 30 different reports with the SEC , according to Sherwood , noting that reports from foreign companies start with the letter F..
Check Uniform Commercial Code filings , available from Dun & Bradstreet , added Sherwood , if you want to know what companies are borrowing money , the method and what the money is to be used for.And Sherwood also recommends the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Web_site , since any company that's building a manufacturing plant has to apply for some sort_of EPA permit. The EPA site can be searched by ZIP code or by hazardous waste , and permits are filed years before plants will be online , he said.
Internet Tracking Sites
Sherwood suggests using free Internet site tools that track competitive information and deliver it via e-mail.Some will notify a subscriber when particular website pages change , which can be used , for_example , to monitor changes in competitors' press_release pages , or their employment opportunity pages.
Others track information such_as when companies apply for patents and trademarks , issue press_releases , register website addresses , or get press coverage.
Sherwood noted that some search portals offer a method for researching the links to a competitor's websiite , providing benchmarking information which compares the number of links ( and presumably , traffic ) a competitor has and showing the Web addresses of linked sites which may reveal a competitor's business relationships.
Organizing the Information Your Company Already Has
Sherwood notes that many companies may not realize the amount of competitive intelligence they already have because the data exists in different departments.He suggests using Internet technology to collect and organize such information.A first step is asking staff via e-mail to send you any competitor information they may have.By putting the competitor's name in the subject field , incoming e-mails with information on different companies can automatically be sorted into different folders.
...
Sherwood suggests a company war room with data posted on the walls where staff from different departments can view the material.
Your finance people , your engineering people , your production people - each looks at competitive intelligence with a different but significant view , he said.If information is tucked away in folders and people can't get a good , visual look at it , you don't get the same impact..
...
The final step to a competitive intelligence program is strategizing , says Sherwood.Start by making an industry demographic assessment , and identifying what factors are causing change.It's not enough to say the Internet is sparking change , Sherwood said.That's too broad.Instead , draw inferences from your industry analysis..
He suggests , for_example , that rather than merely observing that the industry is growing at 12 % a year , look at your own company's growth compared to industry growth rates , and what does that mean about company performance and its future.
...
Consider characteristics such_as the economic environment , income changes , ecological changes , technological changes , political changes and cultural changes , Sherwood said.
The final exercise in a competitive intelligence program is to return to your initial questions , and determine what you would do differently if you knew the answers.If I said I wanted to know my competitors' sales , and I knew the answer , what would I do differently.This is the real key , Sherwood said.
For more information on the four-step competitive intelligence process , contact Robert Sherwood at http : //www.rjsventures.com/.
# # #
Here are some of the informational sites noted by Robert Sherwood in his CIMA teleseminar on competitive-information gathering :.
http : //www.hoovers.com /http : //www.yahoo.com /http : //www.edgar-online.com /www.dnb.com/dnbhome.htmhttp : //www.mindit.netmind.com /http : //www.companysleuth.com /
AEM | News & Information - AEM News -- CIMA Teleseminar Tackles E-Mail Marketing
www.aem.org, 7 Sept 2001 [cached]
However, this powerful and cost-effective tool is often overlooked by marketers, making it one of the Web's best kept secrets," stated Robert J. Sherwood, a principal in Berberick Sherwood & Associates, a technology consulting firm based in Leawood, Kansas, during a recent teleseminar conducted by the Construction Industry Manufacturers Association (CIMA).
Sherwood's CIMA teleseminar was Web enhanced, allowing participants to follow his presentation online, as well as listen to the audio via an audioconference.The Association offers teleseminars as a convenient and cost-effective way for participants to get up-to speed on Internet marketing and other topics of interest to the construction equipment industry.
Permission-Based E-Mail Defined
Permission-based e-mail, according to Sherwood, is communicating by personalized e-mail with selected customers, suppliers, stakeholders and other key audiences who have said they wish to be kept up to date on your company by e-mail.
...
Sherwood outlined several compelling benefits of personalized e-mail marketing.
...
By applying the appropriate techniques and sending messages with appropriate frequency, permission based e-mail marketing will do just the opposite, says Sherwood, nurturing crucial relationships while providing beneficial information to both the recipient and the sender of each message.
Embedded Links: The "Roads" to Customer Response
Sherwood recommended keeping marketing e-mail messages short and benefit-oriented."Businesspeople appreciate e-mails that are like executive summaries, with embedded hyperlinks to specific pages on your website where they can learn more," he explains.
...
Sherwood cautioned against using conventional e-mail programs to manage broadcast e-mail campaigns, because the mail servers of many companies and Internet providers are set up to block incoming messages with large numbers of addresses in the "TO:" field.
Also, off-the-shelf e-mail programs don't allow for personalization of outgoing messages, a key strategy of permission-based e-mail marketing.Instead, he recommends investing in software that is specifically designed to manage e-mail lists and broadcast e-mail campaigns; these programs are designed to avoid these shortcomings.Functions to look for include the ability to automatically remove or add subscribers; personalize messages to the degree you wish; mail to the entire list or just segments of it; and a variety of embedding options within the e-mail to target different customer segments.
Words of Caution
Sherwood offered the following pointers to make the most of e-mail marketing:
ISP Communication: It is important to communicate effectively with Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to avoid network problems (trying to send too many outgoing e-mails at one time via their e-mail server) or being listed as a spammer. Personalization: Personalized e-mail is more likely to attract the recipient's attention than "bulk" e-mail that is not personalized, according to Sherwood. File Delimiters: The ability to use different file delimiters to separate data in a file makes it easier to gather addresses from different sources. News Releases: Due to virus concerns, Sherwood said that when distributing news releases in a permission based e-mail marketing message, they should be sent in the body of the e-mail, not as an attachment - because many companies block or restrict incoming e-mails with attachments, due to virus concerns.
For more information, contact Robert Sherwood at 913-498-1005, or visit http://www.smartagreements.com/bsa.htm.
Hughes Supply | The Source Magazine
www.thesourcemag.com, 1 Jan 1997 [cached]
Whatever the questions, knowing what you want to find out is an essential step before initiating a competitive intelligence program, according to Robert Sherwood, a strategic marketing business consultant.Sherwood, who heads RJSVentures.Com in Leawood, Kansas, has provided consulting services for more than 100 companies, some with sales up to $5 billion.He outlines a four-step process for gathering competitive intelligence:
...
More information: Robert Sherwood, RJSVentures.Com, www.rjsventures.com.
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