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Dr. Robert Ovetz Phd

Wrong Dr. Robert Ovetz Phd?

Celebrity

 
195 Total References
Web References
April 2006, by Robert Ovetz, ...
blog.seaturtles.org, 4 May 2010 [cached]
April 2006, by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Tuna and swordfish are longline fishing's most common targets, but the lines also snag as many as 4.4 million sea turtles, bullfish, sharks, marine mammals and seabirds every year, according to a study of the practice conducted by Robert Ovetz of the California-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
One of the hardest-hit creatures is the migratory leatherback sea turtle, whose numbers in the Pacific have declined by 95 percent since 1980, according to Ovetz.
Scientists warn the leatherback could disappear in the next five to 30 years unless fishing techniques are altered.
Ovetz hailed the U.N. vote as a good first step. But a moratorium "would give us the time to put proven conservation measures into place to keep the leatherback from dropping off into oblivion forever," he added in a statement.
...
"A (fisheries service) report that recommended them was not peer reviewed and was not published" in a scientific journal, said Robert Ovetz, the Save the Leatherback campaign coordinator for the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, based in Marin. "We don't think that's adequate proof they're acceptable."
Ovetz acknowledged that circle hooks do less internal damage to turtles than standard hooks, "but they still hook turtles."
A recent Duke University study concluded that virtually every sea turtle left in the world is caught by a long-line every two years, Ovetz said. Not all turtles die after being hooked.
"We know there is a degree of mortality associated with hooking, no matter what kind of hook is used," Ovetz said.
...
``For so many years, ocean protection groups have been working in isolation,'' Robert Ovetz, coordinator of the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, told reporters. ``The current crisis has united us around the solution.
...
The current crisis has united us around the solution of sustainable use high seas MPAs," said Robert Ovetz, coordinator of the Save the Leatherback Campaign with the project.
...
Tuna and swordfish are the most common targets, but the lines also snag as many as 4.4 million sea turtles, bullfish, sharks, marine mammals and seabirds every year, according to a study of the practice conducted for Costa Rica by Robert Ovetz of the California-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
One of the hardest-hit creatures is the migratory leatherback sea turtle, whose numbers in the Pacific have declined by 95 percent since 1980, according to Ovetz.
...
STRP's Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator Robert Ovetz, PhD is quoted in the story.
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Robert Ovetz is the Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the US-based NGO Sea Turtle Restoration Project. robert@seaturtles.org]
Fishing: The New Resource War April 6th, 2005 by Robert Ovetz
...
Robert Ovetz, Ph.D., is the Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the U.S.-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project. He can be reached at robert@seaturtles.org.
...
"Industrial longline fishing is a loss-loss situation not only for sea turtles but also those who rely on the ocean for their food and livelihood," says Robert Ovetz, PhD, Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator and author of the report.
"Creating a network of Marine Protected Areas would reverse the damage to local fisheries, indigenous peoples, tourism and food security inflicted by industrial longline fishing," he says.
...
"Closing areas of the ocean off from industrial fishing is good for fisheries and turtles," Ovetz said.
...
One of the biggest problems with industrial longlining, Ovetz reports, is that it removes fish from local markets and exports them abroad. Marine Protected Areas would reverse this drain of resources from the developing world.
Ovetz explains, "MPAs are crucial for generating job growth by preserving the very habitats and species that draw visitors to their shores."
...
"We could prevent the extinction of a species," says Robert Ovetz of the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, a conservation group, calling for FAO to support
...
The report's author, marine biologist Dr Robert Ovetz of the United States Sea Turtle Restoration Project, says longline fishing has caused a dramatic decline in leatherback turtle populations, with the number of adult females dropping by 95 per cent in the past two decades. Dr Ovetz said current regulations introduced to manage longline fisheries, such as bycatch mitigation fishing gear, catch limits and area closures had ''failed miserably'', with thousands of fishing vessels operating outside of local and international laws. Many fisheries were ''relentlessly unregulated'', with massive amounts of marine bycatch contributing to global overfishing and impeding the recovery of depleted fish populations and endangered marine species, he said.
...
Robert Ovetz, the author of the report, said that an immediate moratorium should be imposed on longline fishing in the Pacific. "Longlines are wiping out the lions and tigers of the ocean - sharks, billfish and tunas, as well as sea turtles. Catches are indiscriminate and therefore uncontrollable," he said.
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
[Robert Ovetz, PhD is the Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the Sea Turtle Restoration Project. He can be reach at: robert[at]seaturtles.org]
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Robert Ovetz, PhD, is a member of the graduate faculty of New College of California and on the staff of the Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
100,000,000 years old, the leatherback turtle may have as little as 10 years left to live. March 4th, 2004 by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Robert Ovetz is a Marine Species Campaigner for the Sea Turtle Restoration Project. He is on the faculty of the New College of California, San Francisco.
...
By Dr. Robert Ovetz
...
[Robert Ovetz, PhD is a Marine Species Campaigner with the Sea Turtle Restoration Project. Contact him at: robert@seaturtles.org. Sign our petition calling for a UN moratorium on Pacific longlining at: www.seaturtles.org]
Letters to the Editor: Turtle protection is a good start January 20th, 2004 by Dr. Robert Ovetz
...
By Dr. Robert Ovetz
...
Robert Ovetz, a marine species campaign organizer with the California-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project, said the U.N. resolution must come in concert with a U.S. moratorium on pelagic longline fishing in the Pacific. Such open-water gear is used to catch tuna and other large commercial fish, but it generates high levels of bycatch -- such as whales, dolphins, porpoises and sea turtles.
Ovetz's group and the Center for Biological Diversity earlier this month asked the U.S. District Court for Northern California for an emergency injunction to stop shallow longline fishing for swordfish in the high seas of the Pacific Ocean, in areas more than 200 miles from shore (Greenwire, Nov. 4). The same groups followed with a second lawsuit last week aimed at stopping longline fishing off Hawaii on grounds that it harms false killer whales (Greenwire, Nov. 21).
"We're encouraged by the U.N., but we think they can go a lot further," Ovetz said.
...
"NFI's promotion of longline fishing is killing the Pacific Leatherback sea turtle," explains Dr. Robert Ovetz of the California based non-governmental organization Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
...
By Dr. Robert Ovetz
Sea Turtle Restoration Project : STRP News Archive
seaturtles.live.radicaldesigns.org [cached]
April 2006, by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Tuna and swordfish are longline fishing's most common targets, but the lines also snag as many as 4.4 million sea turtles, bullfish, sharks, marine mammals and seabirds every year, according to a study of the practice conducted by Robert Ovetz of the California-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
One of the hardest-hit creatures is the migratory leatherback sea turtle, whose numbers in the Pacific have declined by 95 percent since 1980, according to Ovetz.
Scientists warn the leatherback could disappear in the next five to 30 years unless fishing techniques are altered.
Ovetz hailed the U.N. vote as a good first step. But a moratorium "would give us the time to put proven conservation measures into place to keep the leatherback from dropping off into oblivion forever," he added in a statement.
...
"A (fisheries service) report that recommended them was not peer reviewed and was not published" in a scientific journal, said Robert Ovetz, the Save the Leatherback campaign coordinator for the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, based in Marin. "We don't think that's adequate proof they're acceptable."
Ovetz acknowledged that circle hooks do less internal damage to turtles than standard hooks, "but they still hook turtles."
A recent Duke University study concluded that virtually every sea turtle left in the world is caught by a long-line every two years, Ovetz said. Not all turtles die after being hooked.
"We know there is a degree of mortality associated with hooking, no matter what kind of hook is used," Ovetz said.
...
``For so many years, ocean protection groups have been working in isolation,'' Robert Ovetz, coordinator of the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, told reporters. ``The current crisis has united us around the solution.
...
The current crisis has united us around the solution of sustainable use high seas MPAs," said Robert Ovetz, coordinator of the Save the Leatherback Campaign with the project.
...
Tuna and swordfish are the most common targets, but the lines also snag as many as 4.4 million sea turtles, bullfish, sharks, marine mammals and seabirds every year, according to a study of the practice conducted for Costa Rica by Robert Ovetz of the California-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
One of the hardest-hit creatures is the migratory leatherback sea turtle, whose numbers in the Pacific have declined by 95 percent since 1980, according to Ovetz.
...
STRP's Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator Robert Ovetz, PhD is quoted in the story.
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Robert Ovetz is the Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the US-based NGO Sea Turtle Restoration Project. robert@seaturtles.org]
Fishing: The New Resource War April 6th, 2005 by Robert Ovetz
...
Robert Ovetz, Ph.D., is the Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the U.S.-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project. He can be reached at robert@seaturtles.org.
...
"Industrial longline fishing is a loss-loss situation not only for sea turtles but also those who rely on the ocean for their food and livelihood," says Robert Ovetz, PhD, Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator and author of the report.
"Creating a network of Marine Protected Areas would reverse the damage to local fisheries, indigenous peoples, tourism and food security inflicted by industrial longline fishing," he says.
...
"Closing areas of the ocean off from industrial fishing is good for fisheries and turtles," Ovetz said.
...
One of the biggest problems with industrial longlining, Ovetz reports, is that it removes fish from local markets and exports them abroad. Marine Protected Areas would reverse this drain of resources from the developing world.
Ovetz explains, "MPAs are crucial for generating job growth by preserving the very habitats and species that draw visitors to their shores."
...
"We could prevent the extinction of a species," says Robert Ovetz of the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, a conservation group, calling for FAO to support
...
The report's author, marine biologist Dr Robert Ovetz of the United States Sea Turtle Restoration Project, says longline fishing has caused a dramatic decline in leatherback turtle populations, with the number of adult females dropping by 95 per cent in the past two decades. Dr Ovetz said current regulations introduced to manage longline fisheries, such as bycatch mitigation fishing gear, catch limits and area closures had ''failed miserably'', with thousands of fishing vessels operating outside of local and international laws. Many fisheries were ''relentlessly unregulated'', with massive amounts of marine bycatch contributing to global overfishing and impeding the recovery of depleted fish populations and endangered marine species, he said.
...
Robert Ovetz, the author of the report, said that an immediate moratorium should be imposed on longline fishing in the Pacific. "Longlines are wiping out the lions and tigers of the ocean - sharks, billfish and tunas, as well as sea turtles. Catches are indiscriminate and therefore uncontrollable," he said.
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
[Robert Ovetz, PhD is the Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the Sea Turtle Restoration Project. He can be reach at: robert[at]seaturtles.org]
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Robert Ovetz, PhD, is a member of the graduate faculty of New College of California and on the staff of the Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
100,000,000 years old, the leatherback turtle may have as little as 10 years left to live. March 4th, 2004 by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
by Robert Ovetz, PhD
...
Robert Ovetz is a Marine Species Campaigner for the Sea Turtle Restoration Project. He is on the faculty of the New College of California, San Francisco.
...
By Dr. Robert Ovetz
...
[Robert Ovetz, PhD is a Marine Species Campaigner with the Sea Turtle Restoration Project. Contact him at: robert@seaturtles.org. Sign our petition calling for a UN moratorium on Pacific longlining at: www.seaturtles.org]
Letters to the Editor: Turtle protection is a good start January 20th, 2004 by Dr. Robert Ovetz
...
By Dr. Robert Ovetz
...
Robert Ovetz, a marine species campaign organizer with the California-based Sea Turtle Restoration Project, said the U.N. resolution must come in concert with a U.S. moratorium on pelagic longline fishing in the Pacific. Such open-water gear is used to catch tuna and other large commercial fish, but it generates high levels of bycatch -- such as whales, dolphins, porpoises and sea turtles.
Ovetz's group and the Center for Biological Diversity earlier this month asked the U.S. District Court for Northern California for an emergency injunction to stop shallow longline fishing for swordfish in the high seas of the Pacific Ocean, in areas more than 200 miles from shore (Greenwire, Nov. 4). The same groups followed with a second lawsuit last week aimed at stopping longline fishing off Hawaii on grounds that it harms false killer whales (Greenwire, Nov. 21).
"We're encouraged by the U.N., but we think they can go a lot further," Ovetz said.
...
"NFI's promotion of longline fishing is killing the Pacific Leatherback sea turtle," explains Dr. Robert Ovetz of the California based non-governmental organization Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
...
By Dr. Robert Ovetz
Pacific Fishing - Fish Wrap Archive April 14 - April 18, 2008
www.pacificfishing.com, 21 April 2008 [cached]
Robert Ovetz executive director of Seaflow, a marine conservation organization based in Sausalito, writing in the California Progress Report
Liberation Now! - The National Student Animal Rights Conference
www.defendanimals.org, 24 Oct 2008 [cached]
Robert Ovetz earned a BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Texas at Austin where he was a student activist and co-founder of two alternative newspapers. As the Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, Robert advocates for the international protection of sea turtles and other endangered marine species threatened by industrial longline fishing in the Pacific. He is presently coordinating an Action Camp for student activists interested in becoming ocean wildlife activists. Robert was on the graduate faculty and served as the faculty coordinator of the Masters in Arts and Teaching at the New College of California in San Francisco from 2003-2004. He is currently a faculty member of The Art Institute of California-San Francisco where he teaches Environmental Science.
ENN: Environmental News Network [[Today's News Full Story ]]
www.enn.com, 23 June 2005 [cached]
June 23, 2005 , By Robert Ovetz, PhD, Sea Turtle Restoration Project
...
Robert Ovetz, PhD is an adjunct professor at The Art Institute of California at San Francisco
__________________
Robert Ovetz, PhD is an adjunct instructor at The Art Institute of California-San Francisco and an international ocean advocate with the California based Sea Turtle Restoration Project.
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