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2012-11-19T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Robert Neary?

Mr. Robert Neary L. Jr.

Executive Director of the Office of Construction and Facilities Management

Department of Veterans Affairs

Direct Phone: (202) ***-****       

Email: n***@***.gov

Department of Veterans Affairs

810 Vermont Avenue, Nw

Washington Dc, District of Columbia 20420

United States

Company Description

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) was established on March 15, 1989, succeeding the Veterans Administration. It is responsible for providing federal benefits to veterans and their families. Headed by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, VA is the seco ... more

Find other employees at this company (123,990)

Background Information

Employment History

Executive Director
CFM

Acting Director, Construction and Facilities Management
Veterans Affairs

Education

bachelor's degree
political science

Web References (39 Total References)


Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves ...

www.siteselection.com [cached]

Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

he largest integrated health care system in the United States is in the midst of the biggest infrastructure improvement program it's seen since the end of World War II.
It's the Veterans Health Administration, which, along with the Veterans Benefits Administration and the National Cemetery Administration, comes under the purview of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Replacement plant value of VA facilities exceeds $56 billion, with new construction and major improvements approaching $1 billion in project value per year.
Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of CFM, which is responsible for the planning, design, and construction of all major construction projects greater than $10 million. In addition, CFM acquires real property for use by VA elements through the purchase of land and buildings, as well as long-term lease acquisitions. CFM also manages facility sustainability, seismic corrections, physical security and historic preservation of VA's facilities.
Neary, who's worked with the VA since 1970, says the VA's busiest facility schedule ever was in 1951, when it had 50 hospitals under construction simultaneously. But since 2004, a major initiative has been under way to provide new facilities and improve older ones.
"Right now we're working on about $11 billion of healthcare construction, including six new hospitals," he says from his office in Washington, D.C..
...
CFM also has an active leasing program, Neary explains.
...
Neary projects the equivalent of 3,000 full-time construction jobs in New Orleans for the VA facility, known as Project Legacy, "then, down the road about 2,300 permanent jobs in the medical center, when it's up and operational."
But the real impact, he says, comes from the flow of money through the area, e.g. when a contractor buys copper, or pays its workers. "From most of the statistics I've seen," he says, "$1 billion of construction equates to about 25,000 jobs. At this hospital in New Orleans, it's about $600 million worth of construction."
Neary says Project Legacy is going well after some delays getting started, as the state and the city procured the site and made it available to the VA. Approximately 100 homes were relocated for the project.
...
"There are a lot of opportunities for veterans to get employment," says Neary. "As we get into interior fit-out, we'll have 1,200 to 1,300 every day on the job site."
Learning Key to Location
In describing his team's site selection process for hospitals, Neary says veteran population is the lead criterion, along with amenities for visiting families and proximity to medical schools. In Orlando, the VA considered half a dozen sites, and in New Orleans considered three responses to its advertisement for sites. He says the city had developed a visionary plan prior to Katrina.
...
Neary says working with the neighbors is in the VA's DNA.


Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves ...

sitenet.com [cached]

Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

he largest integrated health care system in the United States is in the midst of the biggest infrastructure improvement program it's seen since the end of World War II.
It's the Veterans Health Administration, which, along with the Veterans Benefits Administration and the National Cemetery Administration, comes under the purview of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Replacement plant value of VA facilities exceeds $56 billion, with new construction and major improvements approaching $1 billion in project value per year.
Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of CFM, which is responsible for the planning, design, and construction of all major construction projects greater than $10 million. In addition, CFM acquires real property for use by VA elements through the purchase of land and buildings, as well as long-term lease acquisitions. CFM also manages facility sustainability, seismic corrections, physical security and historic preservation of VA's facilities.
Neary, who's worked with the VA since 1970, says the VA's busiest facility schedule ever was in 1951, when it had 50 hospitals under construction simultaneously. But since 2004, a major initiative has been under way to provide new facilities and improve older ones.
"Right now we're working on about $11 billion of healthcare construction, including six new hospitals," he says from his office in Washington, D.C..
...
CFM also has an active leasing program, Neary explains.
...
Neary projects the equivalent of 3,000 full-time construction jobs in New Orleans for the VA facility, known as Project Legacy, "then, down the road about 2,300 permanent jobs in the medical center, when it's up and operational."
But the real impact, he says, comes from the flow of money through the area, e.g. when a contractor buys copper, or pays its workers. "From most of the statistics I've seen," he says, "$1 billion of construction equates to about 25,000 jobs. At this hospital in New Orleans, it's about $600 million worth of construction."
Neary says Project Legacy is going well after some delays getting started, as the state and the city procured the site and made it available to the VA. Approximately 100 homes were relocated for the project.
...
"There are a lot of opportunities for veterans to get employment," says Neary. "As we get into interior fit-out, we'll have 1,200 to 1,300 every day on the job site."
Learning Key to Location
In describing his team's site selection process for hospitals, Neary says veteran population is the lead criterion, along with amenities for visiting families and proximity to medical schools. In Orlando, the VA considered half a dozen sites, and in New Orleans considered three responses to its advertisement for sites. He says the city had developed a visionary plan prior to Katrina.
...
Neary says working with the neighbors is in the VA's DNA.


Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves ...

siteselection.com [cached]

Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

he largest integrated health care system in the United States is in the midst of the biggest infrastructure improvement program it's seen since the end of World War II.
It's the Veterans Health Administration, which, along with the Veterans Benefits Administration and the National Cemetery Administration, comes under the purview of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Replacement plant value of VA facilities exceeds $56 billion, with new construction and major improvements approaching $1 billion in project value per year.
Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of CFM, which is responsible for the planning, design, and construction of all major construction projects greater than $10 million. In addition, CFM acquires real property for use by VA elements through the purchase of land and buildings, as well as long-term lease acquisitions. CFM also manages facility sustainability, seismic corrections, physical security and historic preservation of VA's facilities.
Neary, who's worked with the VA since 1970, says the VA's busiest facility schedule ever was in 1951, when it had 50 hospitals under construction simultaneously. But since 2004, a major initiative has been under way to provide new facilities and improve older ones.
"Right now we're working on about $11 billion of healthcare construction, including six new hospitals," he says from his office in Washington, D.C..
...
CFM also has an active leasing program, Neary explains.
...
Neary projects the equivalent of 3,000 full-time construction jobs in New Orleans for the VA facility, known as Project Legacy, "then, down the road about 2,300 permanent jobs in the medical center, when it's up and operational."
But the real impact, he says, comes from the flow of money through the area, e.g. when a contractor buys copper, or pays its workers. "From most of the statistics I've seen," he says, "$1 billion of construction equates to about 25,000 jobs. At this hospital in New Orleans, it's about $600 million worth of construction."
Neary says Project Legacy is going well after some delays getting started, as the state and the city procured the site and made it available to the VA. Approximately 100 homes were relocated for the project.
...
"There are a lot of opportunities for veterans to get employment," says Neary. "As we get into interior fit-out, we'll have 1,200 to 1,300 every day on the job site."
Learning Key to Location
In describing his team's site selection process for hospitals, Neary says veteran population is the lead criterion, along with amenities for visiting families and proximity to medical schools. In Orlando, the VA considered half a dozen sites, and in New Orleans considered three responses to its advertisement for sites. He says the city had developed a visionary plan prior to Katrina.
...
Neary says working with the neighbors is in the VA's DNA.


Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves ...

conwaydata.net [cached]

Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

he largest integrated health care system in the United States is in the midst of the biggest infrastructure improvement program it's seen since the end of World War II.
It's the Veterans Health Administration, which, along with the Veterans Benefits Administration and the National Cemetery Administration, comes under the purview of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Replacement plant value of VA facilities exceeds $56 billion, with new construction and major improvements approaching $1 billion in project value per year.
Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of CFM, which is responsible for the planning, design, and construction of all major construction projects greater than $10 million. In addition, CFM acquires real property for use by VA elements through the purchase of land and buildings, as well as long-term lease acquisitions. CFM also manages facility sustainability, seismic corrections, physical security and historic preservation of VA's facilities.
Neary, who's worked with the VA since 1970, says the VA's busiest facility schedule ever was in 1951, when it had 50 hospitals under construction simultaneously. But since 2004, a major initiative has been under way to provide new facilities and improve older ones.
"Right now we're working on about $11 billion of healthcare construction, including six new hospitals," he says from his office in Washington, D.C..
...
CFM also has an active leasing program, Neary explains.
...
Neary projects the equivalent of 3,000 full-time construction jobs in New Orleans for the VA facility, known as Project Legacy, "then, down the road about 2,300 permanent jobs in the medical center, when it's up and operational."
But the real impact, he says, comes from the flow of money through the area, e.g. when a contractor buys copper, or pays its workers. "From most of the statistics I've seen," he says, "$1 billion of construction equates to about 25,000 jobs. At this hospital in New Orleans, it's about $600 million worth of construction."
Neary says Project Legacy is going well after some delays getting started, as the state and the city procured the site and made it available to the VA. Approximately 100 homes were relocated for the project.
...
"There are a lot of opportunities for veterans to get employment," says Neary. "As we get into interior fit-out, we'll have 1,200 to 1,300 every day on the job site."
Learning Key to Location
In describing his team's site selection process for hospitals, Neary says veteran population is the lead criterion, along with amenities for visiting families and proximity to medical schools. In Orlando, the VA considered half a dozen sites, and in New Orleans considered three responses to its advertisement for sites. He says the city had developed a visionary plan prior to Katrina.
...
Neary says working with the neighbors is in the VA's DNA.


Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves ...

www.siteselection.com [cached]

Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

he largest integrated health care system in the United States is in the midst of the biggest infrastructure improvement program it's seen since the end of World War II.
It's the Veterans Health Administration, which, along with the Veterans Benefits Administration and the National Cemetery Administration, comes under the purview of the Office of Construction & Facilities Management (CFM) at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Replacement plant value of VA facilities exceeds $56 billion, with new construction and major improvements approaching $1 billion in project value per year.
Robert L. Neary, Jr., serves as the acting executive director of CFM, which is responsible for the planning, design, and construction of all major construction projects greater than $10 million. In addition, CFM acquires real property for use by VA elements through the purchase of land and buildings, as well as long-term lease acquisitions. CFM also manages facility sustainability, seismic corrections, physical security and historic preservation of VA's facilities.
Neary, who's worked with the VA since 1970, says the VA's busiest facility schedule ever was in 1951, when it had 50 hospitals under construction simultaneously. But since 2004, a major initiative has been under way to provide new facilities and improve older ones.
"Right now we're working on about $11 billion of healthcare construction, including six new hospitals," he says from his office in Washington, D.C..
...
CFM also has an active leasing program, Neary explains.
...
Neary projects the equivalent of 3,000 full-time construction jobs in New Orleans for the VA facility, known as Project Legacy, "then, down the road about 2,300 permanent jobs in the medical center, when it's up and operational."
But the real impact, he says, comes from the flow of money through the area, e.g. when a contractor buys copper, or pays its workers. "From most of the statistics I've seen," he says, "$1 billion of construction equates to about 25,000 jobs. At this hospital in New Orleans, it's about $600 million worth of construction."
Neary says Project Legacy is going well after some delays getting started, as the state and the city procured the site and made it available to the VA. Approximately 100 homes were relocated for the project.
...
"There are a lot of opportunities for veterans to get employment," says Neary. "As we get into interior fit-out, we'll have 1,200 to 1,300 every day on the job site."
Learning Key to Location
In describing his team's site selection process for hospitals, Neary says veteran population is the lead criterion, along with amenities for visiting families and proximity to medical schools. In Orlando, the VA considered half a dozen sites, and in New Orleans considered three responses to its advertisement for sites. He says the city had developed a visionary plan prior to Katrina.
...
Neary says working with the neighbors is in the VA's DNA.

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