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Wrong Robert Mundell?

Robert A. Mundell

Professor of Economics

University of Chicago

HQ Phone:  (773) 702-1234

Email: r***@***.edu

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University of Chicago

5801 South Ellis Avenue Room 7

Chicago, Illinois,60637

United States

Company Description

Since 2013, the University of Chicago's affiliation with the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA has strengthened both institutions' missions of leadership and innovation in scientific research and education. Come spend a day learning about the MBL,...more

Background Information

Employment History

Teacher

Stanford University


Member, Research Department

International Monetary Fund


Professor of Economics

Columbia University


Summer Professor of International Economics

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies


Associate

International Atlantic Economic Society


Guest Lecturer

Polyconomics , Inc.


President and Chief Executive Officer

Streetfighter Motorsports LLC


Vice President

Truck Works Inc


Affiliations

The World Innovation Foundation

Consultant Member


Berggruen Institute

Board Member


Economics

Fellow


International Monetary Fund

Member, 1961


European Commission

Consultant To the Monetary Committee


American Economic Association

Fellow


Bellagio-Princeton Study Group on International Monetary Reform

Member


Post-Doctoral

Fellow


Web References(191 Total References)


CEA Fellow: Robert Mundell

www.economics.ca [cached]

Robert Mundell
CEA Fellow: Robert Mundell Robert Alexander Mundell, University Professor and McVickar Professor of Political Economy at Columbia University, Companion of the Order of Canada, is one of the two Fellows of the Canadian Economics Association elected in 2015, the highest honour awarded by the Association in recognition of a lifetime of distinguished contributions to economics in Canada. ,P.Professor Mundell won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science in 1999 for his work in international and monetary economics, and is the only living person for whom the Canadian Economics Association has named a prize, the Robert A. Mundell Prize for the year's best Canadian Journal of Economics article by a young scholar. Born in 1932 in Kingston, Ontario, he graduated from the University of British Columbia, took his MA at the University of Washington, Seattle, and in 1956 received his PhD at MIT, after which he was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Chicago in 1956-57. After teaching at Stanford and at the Johns Hopkins Bologna Center, Mundell joined the Research Department of the International Monetary Fund in 1961. He was Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and editor of the Journal of Political Economy from 1966 to 1971 (and, in summers from 1965 to 1975, Professor of International Economics in Geneva). After teaching at the University of Waterloo, he has been at Columbia University since 1974. Mundell propounded his theory of optimal currency areas in 1961, and in a series of papers in the early 1960s (some of them in the Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science) was one of the two pioneers of the open-economy IS-LM-BP macroeconomic model, the open-economy counterpart to the Keynes-Hicks IS-LM model (see papers collected in Mundell, International Economics, New York: Macmillan, 1968). The other pioneer of the open-economy macroeconomic model was the late J. Marcus Fleming of the IMF (see Fleming, Essays in International Economics, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1971, and Mundell and Jacques J. Polak, eds., The New International Monetary System: Conference sponsored by the IMF and Columbia University as a memorial to J. Marcus Fleming, NY: Columbia University Press, 1977). Together with his Chicago and Geneva colleague Harry G. Johnson, Mundell was also a pioneer of the monetary approach to the balance of payments and exchange rates, the open-economy extension of the quantity theory of money (see papers collected in Mundell, International Economics, 1968, and in his Monetary Theory, Pacific Palisades, NJ: Goodyear, 1971). Beginning with his plan for a European currency, published in 1973, Robert Mundell has come to be known as "the father of the Euro."


Dr. Robert Mundell -- International Financial Architecture

www.usagold.com [cached]

by Dr. Robert A. Mundell, Columbia University
For the past twenty five years, Robert Mundell has been Professor of Economics at Columbia University in New York . He studied at the University of British Columbia and the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. from MIT. He taught at Stanford University and the Bologna (Italy) Center of the School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University before joining, in 1961, the staff of the International Monetary Fund. From 1966 to 1971 he was a Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and Editor of the Journal of Political Economy; he was also summer Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1974 he came to Columbia University. He has written extensively on the history of the international monetary system and played a significant role in the founding of the euro. In 1983 he received the Jacques Rueff Medal and Prize in the French Senate; in 1997 he became a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association; in 1998, he was made a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science; and in 1999, he received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science. Dr. Robert A. Mundell Dept. of Economics Copyright © 2000 by Dr. Robert Mundell. All Rights Reserved.


People Power - ECO Capex

ecocapacityexchange.com [cached]

Dr. Robert Mundell
Robert Mundell is a Nobel Laureate and Professor of Economics at Columbia University in New York. He taught at Stanford University and the Bologna (Italy) Centre of the School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University before joining, in 1961, the staff of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). From 1966 to 1971, he was a Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and Editor of the Journal of Political Economy. He was also summer Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1974, he came to Columbia University. Dr. Mundell has lectured widely in North and South America, Europe, Africa, Australia and Asia. He has been an adviser to a number of international agencies and organisations, including the United Nations, the IMF, the World Bank, the Government of Canada, several governments in Latin America and Europe, the Federal Reserve Board and the US Treasury. In 1970, he was a consultant to the Monetary Committee of the European Economic Commission, and in 1972 to 1973, a member of the nine consultants to the Commission that prepared a report in Brussels on European monetary integration. He was a member of the Bellagio-Princeton study group on International Monetary Reform from 1964 to 1978 and Chairman of the Santa Colomba Conferences on International Monetary Reform between 1971 and 1987. He is a Companion of the Order of Canada.


www.berggruen.org

Robert Mundell
Council for the Future of Europe Since 1974, Robert Mundell (born 1932) has been Professor of Economics at Columbia University in New York. After studying at M.I.T. and the London School of Economics, he received his Ph.D. from M.I.T. in 1956, and was the Post-Doctoral Fellow in Political Economy at the University of Chicago in 1956-57. He taught at Stanford University and The Johns Hopkins Bologna Center of Advanced International Studies before joining the staff of the International Monetary Fund in 1961. From 1966 to 1971 he was a Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and Editor of the journal of Political Economy; and from 1965 to 1975, he was (summer) Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. For 1997-98 he was the AGIP Professor of Economics at the Johns Hopkins Bologna Center of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Professor Mundell has been an adviser to a number of international agencies and organizations including the United Nations, the IMF, the World Bank, the European Commission, and several governments in Latin America and Europe, the Federal Reserve Board, the US Treasury and the Government of Canada. In 1970, he was a consultant to the Monetary Committee of the European Economic Commission, and in 1972-73 a member of its Study Group on Economic and Monetary Union in Europe. He was a member of the Bellagio-Princeton Study Group on International Monetary Reform from 1964 to 1978, and Chairman of the Santa Colombia Conferences on International Monetary Reform between 1971 and 1987. The author of numerous works and articles on economic theory of international economics, he prepared one of the first plans for a common currency in Europe and is known as the father of the theory of optimum currency areas. He was a pioneer of the theory of the monetary and fiscal policy mix, the theory of inflation and interest and growth, the monetary approach to the balance of payments, and the co-founder of supply-side economics. He has also written extensively on the history of the international monetary system. Mundell's writings include over a hundred articles in the scientific journals and the following books: The International Monetary System: Conflict and Reform (1965); Man and Economics and International Economics (1968); Monetary Theory: Interest, Inflation and Growth in the World Economy 1971; and co-edited A Monetary Agenda for the World Economy (1983); Global Disequilibrium (1990); Debts, Deficits and Economic Performance (1991); Building the New Europe (1992); Inflation and Growth in China (1996).


classicalcapital.com

On October 13, 1999, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced its award of the Nobel Prize in Economics to Robert A. Mundell, citing "... his analysis of monetary and fiscal policy under different exchange rate regimes and his analysis of optimum currency areas."
The announcement said further: "Robert Mundell has established the foundation for the theory which dominates practical policy considerations of monetary and fiscal policy in open economies. His work on monetary dynamics and optimum currency areas has inspired generations of researchers. Although dating back several decades, Mundell's contributions remain outstanding and constitute the core of teaching in international macroeconomics. "Mundell's research has had such a far-reaching and lasting impact because it ... [produced] results with immediate policy applications. Above all, Mundell chose his problems with uncommon - almost prophetic - accuracy in terms of predicting the future development of international monetary arrangements and capital markets. ..." These statements are remarkably sweeping when parsed in academic terms. Yet, they say very little to explain to ordinary people how Mundell's work may have touched their lives and fortunes. The Royal Swedish Academy credits Mundell's theories as dominating practical policy-making for both monetary and fiscal [tax and budget] matters in all modern, market economies. And his theories have gained such eminence because Mundell has been "almost prophetic" in analyzing research problems that mirror the real world's conditions before they happen. Is it possible that Robert Mundell has had a greater impact on our lives and well-being than we know? Robert Mundell is the person who furnished the theoretical genius behind "supply-side economics. Those writings, in turn, reveal that three individuals were primarily responsible for advancing the ideas of supply-side economics: Robert Mundell as the economic theoretician; Arthur Laffer as the pragmatic economist with a flair for public relations; and Jude Wanniski as the journalistic link between the two economists, the public, and the worlds of Wall Street finance and Washington politics. One thing can be said about this struggle with a fair degree of certainty: the views of Robert Mundell do not dominate monetary policy at the U. S. Federal Reserve Board. Indeed, Chairman Greenspan reportedly does not even maintain communications with Professor Mundell at present. In his Nobel lecture of December, 1999, Professor Mundell put a pretty face on Fed performance by remarking that a period of relative stability in the dollar's value had been reached. Should we think that Robert Mundell could be helpful to Chairman Greenspan in restoring a degree of luster to the Fed's performance? Robert Mundell Since 1974, Robert Mundell has been Professor of Economics at Columbia University in New York. Canadian-born, he studied at the University of British Columbia and the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. from MIT. He taught at Stanford University and the Bologna (Italy) Center of the School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University before joining, in 1961, the staff of the International Monetary Fund. From 1966 to 1971 he was a Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and Editor of the Journal of Political Economy; he was also summer Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1974 he moved to Columbia University. Mundell and the Kennedy Tax Cut In the Fall of 1961, when Mundell joined the Research Department of the IMF, he was asked to analyze the monetary-fiscal policy mix of the U. S. economy. The economy at the time was experiencing sluggish growth and higher than acceptable unemployment, plus a worsening deficit in the foreign trade current account. President Kennedy had pledged in his 1960 campaign to get the country moving again. In 1964, Mundell had participated in a prestigious study group on international monetary reform that examined the concept of flexible exchange rates among currencies. Mundell understood, however, that cutting the ties between the dollar and gold would make the international system of fixed exchange rates impossible. Each currency would be floating under the management of an independent central bank. By January, 1972, Mundell was predicting severe inflation for the dollar and great instability in the international monetary system. Another important contribution of Robert Mundell was his early recognition and announcement that the worldwide inflation unleashed in 1971 was historic because, for the first time in world history, such inflation would be coupled with progressive income tax systems in all of the developed economies. Mundell and Arthur Laffer had begun collaborating in the '60s while both were on the faculty at the University of Chicago. Jude Wanniski became acquainted with Laffer in 1970, and Laffer began tutoring Wanniski, introducing him to Mundell in May, 1974. Wanniski became the ardent student, first of Laffer in 1970, and then of Mundell himself. Mundell and Laffer were voices in the wilderness, educating Wanniski in their theories and forecasts in order to obtain public exposure for their views. By December, 1974, Mundell was recommending a tax cut of $30 billion. If Mundell and Laffer failed to convert President Ford, they found a devout disciple in Jack Kemp, at the time an obscure congressman from Buffalo, New York. At least this: That the economic insights of one man, Robert Mundell, were the roots and foundation of both the Kennedy tax cuts of 1964 and the tax cuts of the Reagan Revolution in the '80s. So, if you're looking for someone to thank for substantially all of the growth achieved by the U. S. economy during the past 40 years, Robert Mundell should be at the head of the line (with Arthur Laffer and Jude Wanniski close behind). Those who suggest that the economic theories developed by Robert Mundell and his supply-side colleagues are surreptitiously intended to benefit the establishment or to preserve the status quo should consider this: Reflecting upon the two historic events of 1913, the outbreak of World War I and the creation of the Federal Reserve Board, Mundell has written that the second of these two events was the more culpable and the more harmful. Mundell has also observed that the Fed has introduced more inflation into the international monetary system than any other institution in the history of the world. One more thing you should know about supply-side economics as espoused by Robert Mundell, Arthur Laffer and Jude Wanniski. Let's hope the Fed Chairman has learned his lesson and has turned towards the advice offered since 1997 by Mundell and Wanniski. A move by Friedman's monetarists towards the classical economics of Mundell, Laffer and Wanniski could lead very promptly to a stable - even a gold-valued - dollar. The Europeans were importantly influenced by Professor Mundell's advice in creating the Euro, which surely must have impelled the Royal Swedish Academy to award his Nobel Prize. So they certainly should be inclined to respect his views now on the management of the Euro. What happens if the European Central Bank begins following the advice of Mundell and Wanniski before the Fed does? The European Central Bank may already be targeting gold, as Mundell advises with respect to the dollar, to maintain the Euro's stability.


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