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Robert Meagher

Staff Scientist

Sandia National Laboratories

HQ Phone:  (505) 293-0500

Direct Phone: (925) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Sandia National Laboratories

3707 Juan Tabo Blvd NE

Albuquerque, New Mexico,87111

United States

Company Description

Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Graduate Student

Northwestern University


Web References(9 Total References)


www.mdtmag.com

Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes.
He is now working to add the...


www.newswise.com

Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes.
He is now working to add the ability to screen...


www.mdtmag.com

Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes.
He is now working to add the ability to screen for Zika virus. "Our ultimate goal is to develop an autonomous device to passively monitor for mosquito-borne diseases," Meagher explained. "But first you need an assay that is more robust than the gold standard in a laboratory and that has a very low false-positive rate." Brighter than the Sun Meagher and Sandia colleagues Yooli Light, Chung-Yan Koh and postdoctoral researcher Cameron Ball describe the technique in a paper published online in Analytical Chemistry, "Quenching of unincorporated amplification signal reporters (QUASR) in RT-LAMP enables bright, single-step, closed-tube and multiplexed detection of RNA viruses." Red means a disease is present to Sandia National Laboratories' researchers Cameron Ball and Robert Meagher as they test their QUASR, for quenching of unincorporated amplification signal reporters, technique to detect the presence of malaria and viruses like West Nile. "We didn't expect a signal that bright, so we came up with the name QUASR, inspired by quasars, the extremely luminous celestial objects that can be a trillion times brighter than the sun," Meagher said. "This would allow those in the field to make quick decisions on mosquito abatement that can prevent the spread of disease," Meagher said. Discriminating Ebola from Malaria QUASR also can be adapted to screen people for diseases such as the Zika virus or Ebola virus. This is a constantly changing landscape; a year ago, few people had even heard of Zika virus, which the World Health Organization recently declared an international health emergency. "Conceptually, it's not difficult to adapt the assay for a different virus," said Meagher. "There is some trial and error involved in refinement as you are dealing with a different virus and human sample." Meagher recently received a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to develop a field-deployable assay for differential diagnosis of malaria and viral febrile illnesses including Ebola. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is a partner in the grant. Because malaria and Ebola have similar symptoms - fever, chills, headache, diarrhea and vomiting - health officials worry that patients with malaria are being sent to Ebola quarantine wards. "A point-of-care device that can quickly discriminate Ebola from malaria in a blood sample would prevent dangerous misdiagnoses," said Meagher. Lassa, dengue and other febrile illnesses are also targets for the NIH project. A Bright Future Meagher and his team set out to tackle the problem of false positives. "Even a marginal false positive rate would defeat the purpose of an autonomous monitoring device," he said. "The signal amplification, the amazing brightness of the positive response, was not a goal but certainly a welcome result. While the human eye can only effectively discriminate three distinct colors, the team is developing imaging technology that could enable simultaneous screening of even more targets. "I'm very excited about what this technique can do for field workers," Meagher said.


www.thelatestnews.com

To help in the battle against disease carrying mosquitoes, Dr. Robert Meagher, of Sandia National Laboratories, has devised a new method for simultaneously detecting a range of mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria.


www.infectioncontroltoday.com

Red means a disease is present to Sandia National Laboratories' researchers Cameron Ball and Robert Meagher as they test their QUASR, for quenching of unincorporated amplification signal reporters, technique to detect the presence of malaria and viruses like West Nile.
Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes. He is now working to add the ability to screen for Zika virus. "Our ultimate goal is to develop an autonomous device to passively monitor for mosquito-borne diseases," Meagher explained. "But first you need an assay that is more robust than the gold standard in a laboratory and that has a very low false-positive rate." Meagher and Sandia colleagues Yooli Light, Chung-Yan Koh and postdoctoral researcher Cameron Ball describe the technique in a paper published online in Analytical Chemistry, "Quenching of unincorporated amplification signal reporters (QUASR) in RT-LAMP enables bright, single-step, closed-tube and multiplexed detection of RNA viruses." "We didn't expect a signal that bright, so we came up with the name QUASR, inspired by quasars, the extremely luminous celestial objects that can be a trillion times brighter than the sun," Meagher said. "This would allow those in the field to make quick decisions on mosquito abatement that can prevent the spread of disease," Meagher said. QUASR also can be adapted to screen people for diseases such as the Zika virus or Ebola virus. This is a constantly changing landscape; a year ago, few people had even heard of Zika virus, which the World Health Organization recently declared an international health emergency. "Conceptually, it's not difficult to adapt the assay for a different virus," said Meagher. "There is some trial and error involved in refinement as you are dealing with a different virus and human sample." Meagher recently received a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to develop a field-deployable assay for differential diagnosis of malaria and viral febrile illnesses including Ebola. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is a partner in the grant. Because malaria and Ebola have similar symptoms -- fever, chills, headache, diarrhea and vomiting -- health officials worry that patients with malaria are being sent to Ebola quarantine wards. "A point-of-care device that can quickly discriminate Ebola from malaria in a blood sample would prevent dangerous misdiagnoses," said Meagher. Lassa, dengue and other febrile illnesses are also targets for the NIH project. Meagher and his team set out to tackle the problem of false positives. "Even a marginal false positive rate would defeat the purpose of an autonomous monitoring device," he said. "The signal amplification, the amazing brightness of the positive response, was not a goal but certainly a welcome result. While the human eye can only effectively discriminate three distinct colors, the team is developing imaging technology that could enable simultaneous screening of even more targets. "I'm very excited about what this technique can do for field workers," Meagher said.


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