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Wrong Robert McMurray?

Robert G. McMurray

Professor

University of North Carolina

HQ Phone:  (984) 974-1000

Email: r***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of North Carolina

101 Manning Drive Suite 6002 East Wing

Chapel Hill, North Carolina,27514

United States

Company Description

One of only 41 NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers, the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center brings together some of the most exceptional physicians and scientists in the country to investigate and improve the prevention,...more

Web References(54 Total References)


www.peakhealth.co.uk

But a new study by Robert McMurray at the University of North Carolina proves it does not.
The design of the study was very clever. Knowing that the muscles' ability to produce lactate is limited by the amount of glycogen they store, McMurray had a group of eight experienced triathletes perform incremental exercise tests in two conditions: once with normal muscle glycogen stores and again with glycogen stores depleted by low carbohydrate intake before the test. McMurray found that the relationship between blood lactate concentration and ventilation differed between the two trials, a clear indication that breathing rate and depth are not directly controlled by blood lactate.


running.competitor.com

But a study by Robert McMurray at the University of North Carolina proves it does not.
RELATED: 3 Things Every Runner Should Do The design of the study was very clever. Knowing that the muscles' ability to produce lactate is limited by the amount of glycogen they store, McMurray had a group of eight experienced triathletes perform incremental exercise tests in two conditions: once with normal muscle glycogen stores and again with glycogen stores depleted by low carbohydrate intake before the test. McMurray found that the relationship between blood lactate concentration and ventilation differed between the two trials, a clear indication that breathing rate and depth are not directly controlled by blood lactate. So what does cause the ventilatory threshold? According to McMurray, the evidence suggests that it is the activation of fast-twitch muscle fibers.


news.discovery.com

"The association between physical activity and cardiovascular disease risk factors in children has been the focus of research for over two decades," Robert McMurray, of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, wrote in an accompanying commentary.
"When clinicians recommend physical activity for children they should evaluate 'at risk' children on a case-by-case basis rather than using generalized guidelines," McMurray wrote.


www.happinessandwisdom.com

A 20-30 minute exercise session at 80 percent of your capacity can bring on the endorphins we’ll be discussing later, according to research conducted by Robert G. McMurray of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
In fact some of the latest research articles on exercise point to the effectiveness of interval training â€" bursts of high intensity exercise for 30-60 seconds followed by a period of low exertion for a minute or two.


www.happinessandwisdom.com [cached]

A 20-30 minute exercise session at 80 percent of your capacity can bring on the endorphins we'll be discussing later, according to research conducted by Robert G. McMurray of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
In fact some of the latest research articles on exercise point to the effectiveness of interval training - bursts of high intensity exercise for 30-60 seconds followed by a period of low exertion for a minute or two.


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