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Last Update

2013-07-31T00:00:00.000Z

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Background Information

Employment History

Professor Researcher

Tarleton State University

Expert In Growth and Development

Tarleton State University

President

No Coal Coalition

Chair

Institute for the Study of Youth Sports

Member, Department of Kinesiology

Institute for the Study of Youth Sports

Editor

Journal of Human Biology

Professor of Health Education

University of Texas

Professor of Kinesiology and Anthropology

University of Texas

Anthropologist

Michigan State University

Member, Department of Kinesiology

Michigan State University

Research Associate of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Michigan State University

Editor In Chief

American Journal of Human Biology

Anthropologist

American Journal of Human Biology

Editor

American Journal of Human Biology

Editor

Versita Ltd

Teacher

University of Texas at Austin

Professor of Kinesiology and Anthropology

University of Texas at Austin

Anthropologist

Affiliations

Board Member
Institute for the Study of Youth Sports at Michigan State University

Board Member
Institute for the Study of Youth Sports

Advisory Board Member
Versita Ltd

Professor Emeritus of Kinesiology and Health Education
University of Texas at Austin

Education

PhD

PhD , FACSM

doctoral degrees
physical education
University of Wisconsin , Madison

Web References (111 Total References)


CAMBIO

www.cambio-red.net [cached]

Robert Malina Investigator and Professor, Tarleton State University, Texas Professor Emeritus, Department of Kinesiology, University of Texas


VERSITA

www.versita.com [cached]

Robert M. Malina , Tarleton State University, Stephenville, Texas, USA


i-Newswire.com - Press Release And News Distribution - Children need 60 minutes of daily physical activity, expert panel says

www.i-newswire.com [cached]

"The important thing is we have to get American children and adolescents active," says co-chair Dr. Robert M. Malina, research professor and an expert in growth and development at Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas."The evidence is very clear that physical activity has decreased dramatically in the last 10 to 20 years," Dr. Malina says as the technology revolution of the 1980s produced more sedentary options for children while their caloric intake has essentially remained the same.

"Our children are just not burning up those calories today," Dr. Malina says of the obesity epidemic in children.
...
"Youngsters tend to get bored easily so they have to have variety," says Dr. Malina, who has doctoral degrees in both physical education and anthropology."In addition, youngsters like physical activities that are challenging."
Experts say much of the needed activity can be achieved at school with appropriate physical education, recess, intramural sports and before- and after-school programs."In this regard, CDC recommends daily quality physical education from kindergarten through grade 12," the panelists write."Both physical education and recess afford opportunities to achieve the daily physical activity goal without any evidence of compromising academic performance….Restoration of intramural sport programs and expansion of the school day for such programs in middle and high schools may provide opportunities for all students to be physically active."
"We need to educate teachers and administrators that physical education is important for youngsters," says Dr. Malina, noting that historically when concerns about progress in math and science emerge, physical education and art get moved aside."The evidence is clear, a renewed emphasis on physical activity in our schools will not have a negative impact on academics," he says.


KnoxNews: National

www.knoxvillenews.com [cached]

"The evidence is very clear that physical activity has decreased dramatically in the last 10 to 20 years," said Robert Malina, an expert in growth and development at Tarleton State University in Texas and co-chairman of a panel that spent more than a year reviewing the impact of physical activity on children's health for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

>
Malina contends the technological revolution of the 1980s was a leading factor in making children more sedentary while their caloric intact has essentially remained the same."Our children are just not burning up those calories today," he said.
According to the CDC, 16 percent of children ages 6 to 19, or about 9 million, are considered overweight, and that number has tripled since 1980.
...
"Youngsters tend to get bored easily, so they have to have variety," said Malina, who holds doctorates in both physical education and anthropology."In addition, youngsters like physical activities that are challenging."
The experts said much of the needed activity could be achieved at school with appropriate physical-education classes, recess, intramural sports and before- and after-school programs, noting that the CDC recommends quality daily PE from kindergarten through grade 12, and that there is no evidence that such programs deter from academic performance.
"We need to educate teachers and administrators that physical education is important for youngsters," said Malina, noting that when concerns about progress in math or science emerge, physical education and the arts get shunted aside.
"The evidence is clear - a renewed emphasis on physical activity in our schools will not have a negative impact on academics," he added.
...
- Robert Malina, co-chairman of the panel on physical-activity recommendations.
(Contact Lee Bowman at BowmanL(at)SHNS.com.Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service, http://www.shns.com)


Parenting Tips and Advice for Teen Problems & Everyday Life - ParentingTeensOnline - Teens & Sports Injuries: A Parent's Guide -- ParentingTeensOnline | ParentingTeensOnline

www.parentingteensonline.com [cached]

Dr. Robert M. Malina, Director of the Institute for the Study of Youth Sports at Michigan State University, believes strongly that parents must watch what's going on, check out trainers and leagues, visit practices unannounced, and most importantly, pay attention to the coaching their child is getting.

"Good coaches know the states of mind and body of the kids who play for them," says Dr. Malina. A good coach who understands adolescent physiology and psychology can be hard to find, however. Parents should learn how local organizations screen and train coaches. The National Association for Sports and Physical Education publishes coaching standards, but adherence is voluntary. Parents might obtain copies to see how leagues and individuals measure up. Coaching is teaching, Dr. Malina says, that should address a child's ability, size, weaknesses, and maturity.
"Coaches must understand and cope with the physiological, psychological, and social changes of puberty. They must know how to direct [young athletes] because of the normal variations in puberty," says Dr. Malina.

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