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Wrong Robert Craig?

Robert J. Craig

Executive Director

Bird Conservation Research Inc

HQ Phone:  (860) 928-2178

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Bird Conservation Research Inc

P.O. Box 209

Pomfret, Connecticut,06258

United States

Company Description

Bird Conservation Research, Inc. was founded in 1999 as a publicly supported non-profit foundation that provides original scientific data for driving conservation action. It also develops high-level educational resources for the science teaching community. The... more.

Find other employees at this company (2)

Web References(11 Total References)


General Meeting Schedule

www.newhavenbirdclub.org [cached]

Thursday, October 11, 2012 - Robert Craig
Our speaker this evening is Robert Craig, General Director of Bird Conservation Research (BCR), a nonprofit foundation based in Putnam, CT. The group provides original scientific data for driving conservation action by users as diverse as land trusts, biology educators, planning and zoning commissions and even the National Park Service. Of special interest to us is that the foundation's focus is on the most diverse wildlife group: birds and the habitats that support them. BCR has conducted a Forest Bird Survey of Southern New England. This summer-winter quanti-tative survey of the populations, distributions, and habitat preferences of forest birds in Connecticut and Rhode Island was conducted along 148 transects and logged the occurrence of more than 50,000 individuals of nearly 100 species. It concurrently made nearly 18,000 measurements on habitats. Robert Craig is perfectly suited for his job-he has studied birds for 40 years. Educated at Rutgers and UConn, he focused on wildlife management and ornithology and earned a PhD in zoology from UConn. His research has led to nearly 100 contributions to the scientific literature.


Bird Conservation Research : About Us

www.birdconservationresearch.org [cached]

Papers must be accompanied by an e-mail submitted to Dr. Robert Craig, Editor, at mail@birdconservationresearch.org that (1) names the paper title, (2) identifies the corresponding author, (3) verifies that the submission has not been previously published and is not in consideration by another outlet, (4) verifies that any copyright permission for reproduced work has been received and (5) verifies by name that a colleague or advisor has previewed and provided comments on the manuscript.


An Exaltation of Larks Part I | Quackin' Grass Nursery

www.quackingrassnursery.com [cached]

Dr. Robert Craig'
Dr. Robert Craig, locally famous ornithologist, author and teacher has studied bird populations in all quarters of Connecticut and Rhode Island in every season. Dr. Craig founded Bird Conservation Research (BCR) in 1999. This non-profit research foundation formulates scientific evaluation which provides municipalities, land trusts and others in making informed decisions regarding open space acquisitions and their management. In this vein Robert has written texts which have been very helpful to towns interested in making careful choices in land set-asides. I asked Rob to share some lesser known facts regarding our regional woodlands and bird populations. He pointed out that forest communities are dynamic; woodlands metamorphose over long periods of time, transitioning through various successions until maturity is achieved. Robert tells us species doing well presently include Ovenbirds, Veery, Red-eyed Vireo and Scarlet Tanagers. Another interesting point Robert made is that even on substantial land set-asides but those near larger cities, the number of species living in these preserves are many less than they would be if near smaller towns. Though it's difficult to know with certainty several factors may contribute to the diminished number of species: feral cats and increased human foot traffic upset ground-nesting species. Skewed balances of plant species might directly dissuade species which might more heavily depend on those plants in fewer numbers. Also, soaring squirrel populations can tip the balance and impact species competing for the same foods. A more hopeful piece of Dr. Craig's research has demonstrated that many species congregate and winter in southern Connecticut.


www.quackingrassnursery.com

Dr. Robert Craig'
Dr. Robert Craig, locally famous ornithologist, author and teacher has studied bird populations in all quarters of Connecticut and Rhode Island in every season. Dr. Craig founded Bird Conservation Research (BCR) in 1999. This non-profit research foundation formulates scientific evaluation which provides municipalities, land trusts and others in making informed decisions regarding open space acquisitions and their management. In this vein Robert has written texts which have been very helpful to towns interested in making careful choices in land set-asides. I asked Rob to share some lesser known facts regarding our regional woodlands and bird populations. He pointed out that forest communities are dynamic; woodlands metamorphose over long periods of time, transitioning through various successions until maturity is achieved. Robert tells us species doing well presently include Ovenbirds, Veery, Red-eyed Vireo and Scarlet Tanagers. Another interesting point Robert made is that even on substantial land set-asides but those near larger cities, the number of species living in these preserves are many less than they would be if near smaller towns. Though it's difficult to know with certainty several factors may contribute to the diminished number of species: feral cats and increased human foot traffic upset ground-nesting species. Skewed balances of plant species might directly dissuade species which might more heavily depend on those plants in fewer numbers. Also, soaring squirrel populations can tip the balance and impact species competing for the same foods. A more hopeful piece of Dr. Craig's research has demonstrated that many species congregate and winter in southern Connecticut.


www.quackingrassnursery.com

Dr. Robert Craig, locally famous ornithologist, author and teacher has studied bird populations in all quarters of Connecticut and Rhode Island in every season.
From steamy bug-infested swamps in summer to frozen ice-coated forests in winter this intrepid researcher ... Continue reading →]]> Dr. Robert Craig' Dr. Robert Craig, locally famous ornithologist, author and teacher has studied bird populations in all quarters of Connecticut and Rhode Island in every season. Dr. Craig founded Bird Conservation Research (BCR) in 1999. This non-profit research foundation formulates scientific evaluation which provides municipalities, land trusts and others in making informed decisions regarding open space acquisitions and their management. In this vein Robert has written texts which have been very helpful to towns interested in making careful choices in land set-asides. I asked Rob to share some lesser known facts regarding our regional woodlands and bird populations. He pointed out that forest communities are dynamic; woodlands metamorphose over long periods of time, transitioning through various successions until maturity is achieved. Robert tells us species doing well presently include Ovenbirds, Veery, Red-eyed Vireo and Scarlet Tanagers. Another interesting point Robert made is that even on substantial land set-asides but those near larger cities, the number of species living in these preserves are many less than they would be if near smaller towns.


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