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This profile was last updated on 11/21/13  and contains information from public web pages.

Robert Ames Alden

Wrong Robert Ames Alden?

Editor

Phone: (202) ***-****  HQ Phone
National Press Club
529 14Th St. NW , 13Th Floor
Washington , District of Columbia 20045
United States

Company Description: The National Press Club is the world's leading professional organization for journalists. Founded in 1908, the Club has 3,500 members representing most major news...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • bachelor Degree
    George Washington University
  • master's degree
    George Washington University
82 Total References
Web References
Robert Ames Alden retired ...
www.justice-integrity.org [cached]
Robert Ames Alden retired from the Washington Post in 2000 after more than 48 years as an editor, making him the longest-serving editor in the paper's history. As night news editor in 1963, he put together the Post's first extra edition since Pearl Harbor to cover the assassination of President Kennedy. As world news editor in 1974, he was the principal architect for the Post's coverage of the resignation of President Nixon. Culminating a seven-year effort in 1975, he co-founded and later led the National Press Foundation to improve journalism education. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he was the leading male advocate for the admission of women into the National Press Club, where he served as president in 1976.
The first native Washingtonian to lead the Press Club, he began his career as a sportswriter for the Cleveland Press in 1947. He helped innovate the use of more statistics in baseball coverage and was an award-winning writer. He was a visionary community leader in planning a green, central park, library, outdoor stage, community center and theater for McLean, VA, whose Alden Theater carries his name. He holds bachelor and master's degrees from the George Washington University, where he won the university's top history award as a student for 17 years in the 1950s and 1960s. In 2005, university officials bestowing a distinguished alumnus award described Alden as "a living legend" in Washington journalism.
Robert Ames Alden retired ...
www.justice-integrity.org [cached]
Robert Ames Alden retired from the Washington Post in 2000 after more than 48 years as an editor, making him the longest-serving editor in the paper's history. As night news editor in 1963, he put together the Post's first extra edition since Pearl Harbor to cover the assassination of President Kennedy. As world news editor in 1974, he was the principal architect for the Post's coverage of the resignation of President Nixon. Culminating a seven-year effort in 1975, he co-founded and later led the National Press Foundation to improve journalism education. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he was the leading male advocate for the admission of women into the National Press Club, where he served as president in 1976.
The first native Washingtonian to lead the Press Club, he began his career as a sportswriter for the Cleveland Press in 1947. He helped innovate the use of more statistics in baseball coverage and was an award-winning writer. He was a visionary community leader in planning a green, central park, library, outdoor stage, community center and theater for McLean, VA, whose Alden Theater carries his name. He holds bachelor and master's degrees from the George Washington University, where he won the university's top history award as a student for 17 years in the 1950s and 1960s. In 2005, university officials bestowing a distinguished alumnus award described Alden as "a living legend" in Washington journalism.
Directors Biographies
www.justice-integrity.org [cached]
Robert Ames Alden retired from the Washington Post in 2000 after more than 48 years as an editor, making him the longest-serving editor in the paper's history. As night news editor in 1963, he put together the Post's first extra edition since Pearl Harbor to cover the assassination of President Kennedy. As world news editor in 1974, he was the principal architect for the Post's coverage of the resignation of President Nixon. Culminating a seven-year effort in 1975, he co-founded and later led the National Press Foundation to improve journalism education. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he was the leading male advocate for the admission of women into the National Press Club, where he served as president in 1976.
The first native Washingtonian to lead the Press Club, he began his career as a sportswriter for the Cleveland Press in 1947. He helped innovate the use of more statistics in baseball coverage and was an award-winning writer. He was a visionary community leader in planning a green, central park, library, outdoor stage, community center and theater for McLean, VA, whose Alden Theater carries his name. He holds bachelor and master's degrees from the George Washington University, where he won the university's top history award as a student for 17 years in the 1950s and 1960s. In 2005, university officials bestowing a distinguished alumnus award described Alden as "a living legend" in Washington journalism.
Covering prosecutors calls for tough-minded reporters
www.niemanwatchdog.org [cached]
Volunteering guidance, former National Press Club President and retired Washington Post editor Robert Ames Alden cut the Gordian Knot by reminding me that a summary of findings better serves readers than trying to avoid anything that could possibly be construed as "opinion."
Directors Biographies
justice-integrity.org [cached]
Robert Ames Alden retired from the Washington Post in 2000 after more than 48 years as an editor, making him the longest-serving editor in the paper's history. As night news editor in 1963, he put together the Post's first extra edition since Pearl Harbor to cover the assassination of President Kennedy. As world news editor in 1974, he was the principal architect for the Post's coverage of the resignation of President Nixon. Culminating a seven-year effort in 1975, he co-founded and later led the National Press Foundation to improve journalism education. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, he was the leading male advocate for the admission of women into the National Press Club, where he served as president in 1976.
The first native Washingtonian to lead the Press Club, he began his career as a sportswriter for the Cleveland Press in 1947. He helped innovate the use of more statistics in baseball coverage and was an award-winning writer. He was a visionary community leader in planning a green, central park, library, outdoor stage, community center and theater for McLean, VA, whose Alden Theater carries his name. He holds bachelor and master's degrees from the George Washington University, where he won the university's top history award as a student for 17 years in the 1950s and 1960s. In 2005, university officials bestowing a distinguished alumnus award described Alden as "a living legend" in Washington journalism.
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